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The NHS website, quite properly, encourages people to visit their GP if they have any doubts about possible symptoms which may be bothering them. The bother of something which seems not right can completely undermine a person's life. To describe the worried as a problem is fundamentally arrogant. People often know when there is something wrong with them.

Even so, sometimes over-worked GPs are not always as good as Google. Often amazing people but they aren't perfect. And too often they are guessing.

In the UK and therefore also the IOM, fixing the NHS is not going to happen until there is a fundamental reform of taxation. Which means probably never.

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1 hour ago, pongo said:

The NHS website, quite properly, encourages people to visit their GP if they have any doubts about possible symptoms which may be bothering them. The bother of something which seems not right can completely undermine a person's life. To describe the worried as a problem is fundamentally arrogant. People often know when there is something wrong with them.

Even so, sometimes over-worked GPs are not always as good as Google. Often amazing people but they aren't perfect. And too often they are guessing.

In the UK and therefore also the IOM, fixing the NHS is not going to happen until there is a fundamental reform of taxation. Which means probably never.

Taxation policy is largely fine. Government just needs to spend less money on running government. 

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13 hours ago, pongo said:

The NHS website, quite properly, encourages people to visit their GP if they have any doubts about possible symptoms which may be bothering them. The bother of something which seems not right can completely undermine a person's life. To describe the worried as a problem is fundamentally arrogant. People often know when there is something wrong with them.

Even so, sometimes over-worked GPs are not always as good as Google. Often amazing people but they aren't perfect. And too often they are guessing.

In the UK and therefore also the IOM, fixing the NHS is not going to happen until there is a fundamental reform of taxation. Which means probably never.

remove all union control would fix it.....

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20 hours ago, thesultanofsheight said:

Taxation policy is largely fine. Government just needs to spend less money on running government. 

Taxation policy is designed to sponge off people on low and medium incomes. There is no alternative, though, because the premise of reducing tax liability to HNWIs is that they'll be employing people who will in turn be paying taxes. That may work in theory but in practice it's another story, especially when the people paying taxes are people brought over from the UK, overlooking local applicants, and this then pushes up house prices and cost of living, and those people end up costing us more than they bring in when you add up things like healthcare, education, and additional infrastructure. That doesn't bring in revenue, it either allows us to break even or end up spending more.

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22 hours ago, pongo said:

In the UK and therefore also the IOM, fixing the NHS is not going to happen until there is a fundamental reform of taxation. Which means probably never.

The NHS' problem has nothing to do with the amount of money being pumped into it. The problem is the underlying cost of everything which is artificially inflated. Large private corporations in concert with big government, means the former can count on the latter to enable them to rake in massive profits. The NHS is being used as a cash cow by far too many private corporations with politicians in their pockets. Not a problem particular to the Isle of Man, but UK-wide and even internationally. They push up the price of medicines, technology, and so on, because they can count on their friends in government to keep on paying with a blank cheque. Or they could. Now the money is running out, as happens under socialism, and instead of fixing this corrupt system and dealing with the costs, people are being distracted with harmful suggestions about increasing taxes to keep the money pumping into the system. That's not going to work. We need to fix the costs. We need the UK to sort out the corporations to push down the prices, as there's no justification for them to be so high. They were only ever allowed to get so high because government allowed it. Under real free market conditions, prices would never have risen so much.

Edited by Henry
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9 hours ago, woody2 said:

remove all union control would fix it.....

How? I know lots of people blame unions for the high wage bill in govt. But they didn't create the jobs they just do what they are paid to do and that is negotiate the best deal for their members. If more people outside of govt actually got union representation then they might actually get a wage rise. Certain aspects of society want us to hate the unions because they don't want staff getting paid more they want to keep more of the profits. The big issue with govt wage rises is not that they get them it is that they all get the same rise from the bottom to the top. A 2% rise to every worker including those that agree the deal is daft. A 2% rise to those on £100 grand is £2000 but for those at the bottom on £14000 it is £280.  

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27 minutes ago, Henry said:

Now the money is running out,

Money is not running out. The govt of a country with its own currency cannot run out of liquidity (as QE has demonstrated). Govts can literally create liquidity by spending it - inflation not being an issue provided that all liquidity created is also destroyed via taxation.

Banks currently create most liquidity via commercial lending - their profits are taken as a part of what they create. Clearly the govt, ie the people, should actually be taking most of the profit.

This excellent Bank of England article explains modern money in simple to understand terms.

https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/quarterly-bulletin/2014/q1/money-creation-in-the-modern-economy

Quote

This article explains how the majority of money in the modern economy is created by commercial banks making loans. Money creation in practice differs from some popular misconceptions — banks do not act simply as intermediaries, lending out deposits that savers place with them, and nor do they ‘multiply up’ central bank money to create new loans and deposits.

The IOM has an old fashioned household-budget style economy. That clearly isn’t sustainable long term in a world of modern money. 

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Just now, Henry said:

lol. Not worth replying to.

You believe that you know more than the Bank of England and the markets?

Govts and central banks decide how much money is in an economy at any time. It’s an entirely artificial system. But you are almost certainly stuck to the old fashioned  idea that the economy is like the household budget. It isn’t.

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Just now, pongo said:

You believe that you know more than the Bank of England and the markets?

Govts and central banks decide how much money is in an economy at any time. It’s an entirely artificial system. But you are almost certainly stuck to the old fashioned  idea that the economy is like the household budget. It isn’t.

We aren’t a country that can print its own money or raise its own sovereign debt though. So your points are irreverent in respect of the IOM and it’s finances. 

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23 minutes ago, woody2 said:

labour privatised more of the nhs between 2005-2010 than the conservatives have done between 2010-2018....

the problem is the working practices of the nhs and the high wages.....

I don’t think high wages are  true now, if it ever was. Anyone in catering, cleaning, portering is on minimum wage being exploited by the likes of ISS. Facilities management is outsourced to the likes of the former Carillion. They aren’t unionised. Nurses are underpaid, and wards understaffed.

 Medical staff struggle to cope.

Yes, some savings could be made, but truth is we underfund by comparison to most sophisticated, mature, industrialised countries.

The real inefficiencies and cost wastage occurs in a system like the US one, where the number of admin staff and pen pushers dealing with outsourced providers and insurers is huge and drug firms exploit by charging far more than here. But even at huge cost many people aren’t covered and don’t get treatment because they can’t afford. Even the insureds have huge co-payments.

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2 minutes ago, thesultanofsheight said:

We aren’t a country that can print its own money or raise its own sovereign debt though. So your points are irreverent in respect of the IOM and it’s finances. 

The IOM is not a sustainable model in a world of modern money. The household budget is not a good model for govt.

It’s also undemocratic. Since monetary policy here is ultimately determined by the BOE and the UK govt.

ETA: if the IOM uses sterling then it should have an MP, is the point I am making.

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2 minutes ago, John Wright said:

I don’t think high wages are  true now, if it ever was. Anyone in catering, cleaning, portering is on minimum wage being exploited by the likes of ISS. Facilities management is outsourced to the likes of the former Carillion. They aren’t unionised. Nurses are underpaid, and wards understaffed.

 

It's the consultants who are overpaid. Sadly, we have to overpay them in order to attract them here, because there's nothing else we can use to encourage them to come here.

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20 minutes ago, Ham_N_Eggs said:

How? I know lots of people blame unions for the high wage bill in govt. But they didn't create the jobs they just do what they are paid to do and that is negotiate the best deal for their members. If more people outside of govt actually got union representation then they might actually get a wage rise. Certain aspects of society want us to hate the unions because they don't want staff getting paid more they want to keep more of the profits. The big issue with govt wage rises is not that they get them it is that they all get the same rise from the bottom to the top. A 2% rise to every worker including those that agree the deal is daft. A 2% rise to those on £100 grand is £2000 but for those at the bottom on £14000 it is £280.  

nearly every extra penny given to the nhs goes on wage rises, this leads to less been employed and zero improvement in productivity...

forget all this 1% nonsense, most have double the wages they had 12 years ago.....

the policy of going as slow as possible by most nhs staff is epidemic.......

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