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gettafa

Bands that have played in the Isle of Man

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no really i was just adding to what you said. they have redone some classic albums really well in reggae x

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On 3/2/2018 at 9:44 PM, La Colombe said:

I can't imagine Pink Floyd being above anyone's level of understanding, hence their mass appeal and popularity. I've seen them live a couple of times. Their  miserable sound appeals to those who are also attracted to the depressant qualities of excessive alcohol consumption rather than other recreational drug effects. 

nothin miserable about this LC 

 

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Gerry Rafferty, twice, sort of.

1970s he was supporting his mate Billy Connolly and played a rock based set. There was a power cut and the gig was kindly played the following day, which was intended to be a day off for the tour. Instead of replaying the set, he went back to his roots and played more folkie numbers the second night. A magic night/s.

Edited by gettafa
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Here's another band who nearly played over here. The Reverend Black and the Rockin' Vicars (Vickers, sometimes). This Blackpool band came to the Island in the mid-sixties. Now, the story goes... They arrived off the boat one morning during the season, in a Black Maria, with a 3 foot crucifix screwed to the roof and for hours, drove up and down the prom advertising the gig: it may've been Douglas Head or Falcon Cliff, it is a tale told to me many moons ago. Anyway, this publicity stunt turned sour because great offence was taken by some, especially as the Reverend Black himself had climbed on to the roof in full regalia and clinging to the crucifix, proceeded with a loud-hailer, giving it dixie. Some saw it as improper and disrespectful and they were stopped eventually by local plod and ended up back on the next available boat. Probably in the morning. The gig never happened but there was a Manx connection in that a local young businessman of the time, friends with the Reverend, invited them over. The bass player in the Vicars was no other than Lemmy himself. Managed to find an image...

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Not sure if he's in that image, he became the bass player in the second incarnation and that image is a particularly early promo shot. I remember now that they were due to play upstairs in the 'Rendezvous' cafe which stood on Greensill's Corner and was one of the first of the American style diners to appear around the time. Felice's being another. Both places being a mecca for locals 60's kids.

He's on the second on the left in the fitst image. Lol, some image, the dread of Methodists everywhere, someone enjoying themselves... Is this a Who cover? Seems familiar... 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by quilp
Poor thumbage...
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4 hours ago, Shake me up Judy said:

What year would that be Gettafa ? Early 70s I presume ? That's another one I missed :(

I would guess 1975. I will have the ticket somewhere. Billy Connolly wasn't that well known other than for D.I.V.OR.C.E. and Gerry Rafferty less so. People in Scotland knew the score by this time though, and so did Parkinson.

I remember wondering how BC could do so much ad lib. It was brilliant. Got one of his albums of the tour Raw Meat For The Balcony (I think) recorded in Glasgow. All the 'ad libs' were virtually identical! Not taking anything away from him, it was brilliant stuff in hindsight. At the time I was just bemused by it all. My first gig at The Villa Marina (singing in the under 10 school choir was the previous time I had been there).

That Villa Marina has a lot for the people of the Island to be proud of, it's held some fantastic gigs and functions. But possibly second place to The Lido.

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I worked the spotlights in the Villa as a summer job so it may've been 75 or 76. and some way through Billy Connelly's set, the power did fail and the enormous racks of batteries stored beneath the stage as an early UPS, fail to kick in. Consequently, he asked if the backstage staff had a torch which and when produced was placed on a stand to pick him out in a very darkened arena. He then carried on regardless with his acoustic guitar for an hour, singing a collection of songs (including a couple of early Humble Pie compositions) in between bouts of honest and hilarious anecdotes of his early life and rise (quite unexpected) to fame. The old Villa, like most early theatres was designed with unamplified voice and music in mind so he actually carried very well to the full house. Ironically, the power was restored very near to the end of the show, changing the cosy atmosphere. Even given the major hitch he still produced a great show to everyone's delight. Very funny man. 

Edited by quilp
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Over the years, Manx bands have always been quick to offer their services free to worthy local charities. Manx Band Aid took a couple of days to organise the many bands who took part, involving a lot of work with the transportation of equipment and the setting-up, sound checks, etc. took part without a grumble even before playing a note. Found an old clipping from one example which includes a few familiar old faces. The much-missed Charlie Cannell being one and soon-to-be MHK Brenda,  with new addition in arms.

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9 hours ago, quilp said:

I worked the spotlights in the Villa as a summer job so it may've been 75 or 76. and some way through Billy Connelly's set, the power did fail and the enormous racks of batteries stored beneath the stage as an early UPS, fail to kick in. Consequently, he asked if the backstage staff had a torch which and when produced was placed on a stand to pick him out in a very darkened arena. He then carried on regardless with his acoustic guitar for an hour, singing a collection of songs (including a couple of early Humble Pie compositions) in between bouts of honest and hilarious anecdotes of his early life and rise (quite unexpected) to fame. The old Villa, like most early theatres was designed with unamplified voice and music in mind so he actually carried very well to the full house. Ironically, the power was restored very near to the end of the show, changing the cosy atmosphere. Even given the major hitch he still produced a great show to everyone's delight. Very funny man. 

Sorry, just gotta have that re-quoted. That is brilliant.

I could only make the show on the Monday night. Would've loved to have been there Sunday for the power cut. BC did extensive touring of small venues all around Scotland and especially up the west coast so he would been no stranger to a fully acoustic set.  

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