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17 hours ago, dilligaf said:

Ran it very well, was well liked by all his staff and the department. Politics kills good people far too often

I think he gave up when the lunatics took over the asylum.

David Killip’s is an interesting case, because it indicates a rot in our political system which has accelerated since the 2016 election and the later legislative council “election” in 2018 – political interference in the neutrality of public sector managers.  They all want to be Trump.

Killip was censured by Tynwald in February 2014 as a result of ‘the First Report of the Tynwald Standards and Members’ Interests Committee 2013-14 Conduct of Mr Anderson’.  Remember the hapless David Anderson?  It was found that he had misled Tynwald, but that he had been ‘sincere’ and did not ‘knowingly mislead the House’.  This was all in the context of a still familiar theme – the toxic fighting between the consultants at Noble’s and between the consultants and HQ at Crookall House.  The statement which had cause the problem for Anderson ‘was insufficiently vetted by the Department’s officers and there was insufficient care given to preparing this important matter’.

The censure led to Killip’s “early retirement” and an unprecedented clear-out of his senior management team.  You could say that the DHSC has never properly recovered, and it looks to me as if a mafia-like group of consultants went from strength to strength as a result – effectively running Noble’s as a money-making racket.

Mr Toad was put in charge of the new DHSC (presumably that merger also allowed Anderson to be axed without too many questions being asked) and he brought in Charters, Morris, Mahajan and Deadman.  That didn’t work out well.

Our politicians have many failings which seem to become worse once they are in Tynwald.  The classic combo is narcissism (the subject of this topic is a prime example), Richter Scale self-importance, being unbelievably thick (Cregeen was nicknamed ‘two planks’ at the post office), thinking that they are able to understand and manage departments, boards etc. and a desire to settle old scores (often from years ago) through the wielding of their power and influence.

As an example, I remember Mr Toad coming down to Ramsey when he was launching his five year strategy.  We plebs were in the assembly hall of the grammar school, and DHSC politicians and managers were at stations around the sides.  At one point, the big boy pointed across to Quirkio (another blast from the past) and said, I kid you not, ‘Mr Quirk runs social services’.

In recent months it looks like there has been a power play involving the independent review, Spuan’s public accounts committee reports and the boy vampire, and no doubt lots of skeet in the rooms of Tynwald.  Callister and Beecroft’s parts in this are irrelevant from what I can see – although their narcissism forces them to keep jumping up so that we know they are there.  The senior management is cleared out once again not because they are no good, but to help out the politicians.  New people will be brought in and will realise after five minutes that they cannot run services professionally because of the constant interference from the politicians, who always know better.

Michael has obviously spotted this and wants “Manx Care” to be an arm’s length provider like an NHS trust.  Fat chance.

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It seems like they did a briefing last Thursday to members and this is where they "Informed them" of the planned trajectory. This seems disingenous of Quayle. It's one thing to have an informal b

Haha is Rob really complaining about unnecessary questions in Tynwald?  "How much does is cost to send a letter to Jersey?" Idiot.

Hello Mr. PB A family member has alerted me to your posts and as your observations are not correct, it’s only fair that I correct them for you. I joined the civil service on 17th May 1976 wi

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14 minutes ago, Boo Gay'n said:

David Killip’s is an interesting case, because it indicates a rot in our political system which has accelerated since the 2016 election and the later legislative council “election” in 2018 – political interference in the neutrality of public sector managers.  They all want to be Trump.

 

Killip was censured by Tynwald in February 2014 as a result of ‘the First Report of the Tynwald Standards and Members’ Interests Committee 2013-14 Conduct of Mr Anderson’.  Remember the hapless David Anderson?  It was found that he had misled Tynwald, but that he had been ‘sincere’ and did not ‘knowingly mislead the House’.  This was all in the context of a still familiar theme – the toxic fighting between the consultants at Noble’s and between the consultants and HQ at Crookall House.  The statement which had cause the problem for Anderson ‘was insufficiently vetted by the Department’s officers and there was insufficient care given to preparing this important matter’.

 

The censure led to Killip’s “early retirement” and an unprecedented clear-out of his senior management team.  You could say that the DHSC has never properly recovered, and it looks to me as if a mafia-like group of consultants went from strength to strength as a result – effectively running Noble’s as a money-making racket.

 

Mr Toad was put in charge of the new DHSC (presumably that merger also allowed Anderson to be axed without too many questions being asked) and he brought in Charters, Morris, Mahajan and Deadman.  That didn’t work out well.

 

Our politicians have many failings which seem to become worse once they are in Tynwald.  The classic combo is narcissism (the subject of this topic is a prime example), Richter Scale self-importance, being unbelievably thick (Cregeen was nicknamed ‘two planks’ at the post office), thinking that they are able to understand and manage departments, boards etc. and a desire to settle old scores (often from years ago) through the wielding of their power and influence.

 

As an example, I remember Mr Toad coming down to Ramsey when he was launching his five year strategy.  We plebs were in the assembly hall of the grammar school, and DHSC politicians and managers were at stations around the sides.  At one point, the big boy pointed across to Quirkio (another blast from the past) and said, I kid you not, ‘Mr Quirk runs social services’.

 

In recent months it looks like there has been a power play involving the independent review, Spuan’s public accounts committee reports and the boy vampire, and no doubt lots of skeet in the rooms of Tynwald.  Callister and Beecroft’s parts in this are irrelevant from what I can see – although their narcissism forces them to keep jumping up so that we know they are there.  The senior management is cleared out once again not because they are no good, but to help out the politicians.  New people will be brought in and will realise after five minutes that they cannot run services professionally because of the constant interference from the politicians, who always know better.

 

Michael has obviously spotted this and wants “Manx Care” to be an arm’s length provider like an NHS trust.  Fat chance.

 

Where did Tim Mansfield fit into all that?

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14 minutes ago, MrPB said:

Two things strike me the more I read these boards 

1. There seem to only be about 5 posters who don’t work for the hospital or IOM Government on here

2. They all seem to prefer the halcyon days of absolutely no public scrutiny & pretty much being sorted out by their mates or former school chums 

I am wrong? That’s how a lot of the posts lately seem to come across. 

What you seem to forget is that with all the problems at the hospital, is that down to the fact they are all on here?

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16 hours ago, hissingsid said:

The N H S is really a poisoned chalice, it has not been run properly for years in fact the new hospital has never been used to its full potential and is badly designed.  When Howard was health minister he inherited a big, fat , mess, he hired Chartres who he hoped would be helpful, he was not.   All the time he was looking for answers Beecroft was there like a snappy little terrier asking questions about everything and generally being a pain in the arse, not helpful, so when he was made C.M he got revenge by giving her the job knowing she would f...k up big time and she did not disappoint.   She who must be obeyed took over and trampled on anyone and anything who got in her way.   Rob and two others walked and quite rightly, teamwork is essential in any organisation.    If anyone remembers this is the second time two top team members took the high road the last time was when the last damning report came out a few years ago, they took early retirement the day before it was published, obviously they had been allowed to put an eye over it before publication.   The Health Service is in a total mess.   I think David Ashford is doing a very difficult job in extreme circumstances and instead of declaring a climate disaster I think a Health Service disaster is more important and imminent.

 

 

Time for a 'Manx Care Health Trust' & politicians kept out of it

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1 hour ago, MrPB said:

Two things strike me the more I read these boards 

1. There seem to only be about 5 posters who don’t work for the hospital or IOM Government on here

2. They all seem to prefer the halcyon days of absolutely no public scrutiny & pretty much being sorted out by their mates or former school chums 

I am wrong? That’s how a lot of the posts lately seem to come across. 

I for one don't look back to halcyon days, although I do see with each sequential government a deterioration in its quality.  The fish rots from the head, as they say, and in our case the head in many ways is Tynwald and its members.  Making scapegoats of public servants can serve a political purpose, but I haven't seen it lead to improvements.

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On 5/12/2019 at 6:54 PM, MrPB said:

You mean the one who didn’t have enough o levels to join the civil service and failed the exam more than once and then went on to run the DHSS? 

Hello Mr. PB

A family member has alerted me to your posts and as your observations are not correct, it’s only fair that I correct them for you.

I joined the civil service on 17th May 1976 with 4 GCE “O” levels (I subsequently gained a fifth) which allowed me to join as a Clerical Assistant - the  most junior rank - for which 3 O levels were required. (Sadly, no “special pass” for me to avoid entry requirements as you suggested in another of your posts). In order to be eligible for promotion to Clerical Officer I was required to pass a civil service exam and, having done so at the first attempt, was promoted to CO in late 1977. For advancement to Executive Officer a further “EO” exam pass was required (it isn’t these days) in an exam that was close in nature and content to an “A” level. Having passed this exam, also at the first attempt, I was promoted to Executive Officer in December 1983 and to Higher Executive Officer in 1986, the same year that I gained my HNC with Distinction in Public Administration. Further promotions followed and by December 1998 I was a Senior Executive Officer in the Chief Secretary’s Office - today called Cabinet Office - where I undertook two separate job roles in my time there.

By this stage recruitment to CEO posts had matured and involved an “Assessment Centre” as well as formal interview. The Assessment Centre included such elements as psychometric testing, critical problem solving and an interview with an HR psychologist. It was being subject to that regime that preceded my appointment to CEO of the Department of Home Affairs in 2001, being the first of my two CEO posts, and it was a very similar process in 2003 when I joined DHSS,  just after completing all my assignments within the UK Civil Service Top Management  Programme. I remained with DHSS/Department of Health for 11 years until my retirement on 31 March 2014 after a 38 year career.

So... no “special pass”, no “exam failed more than once”, just the exams/qualifications asked for by the organisation. And, not least, the pleasure of working with some great people.

I’m  happy to put the record straight, as you’ve taken such a keen interest.

Kind regards

David Killip

 

Edited by David K
Correcting typo
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1 hour ago, Boo Gay'n said:

Not sure what he did mate, sorry

Supposed commissioning manager, who did not commission much and was “let go”

I think yet another Charters cock up

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53 minutes ago, David K said:

Hello Mr. PB

A family member has alerted me to your posts and as your observations are not correct, it’s only fair that I correct them for you.

I joined the civil service on 17th May 1976 with 4 GCE “O” levels (I subsequently gained a fifth) which allowed me to join as a Clerical Assistant - the  most junior rank - for which 3 O levels were required. (Sadly, no “special pass” for me to avoid entry requirements as you suggested in another of your posts). In order to be eligible for promotion to Clerical Officer I was required to pass a civil service exam and, having done so at the first attempt, was promoted to CO in late 1977. For advancement to Executive Officer a further “EO” exam pass was required (it isn’t these days) in an exam that was close in nature and content to an “A” level. Having passed this exam, also at the first attempt, I was promoted to Executive Officer in December 1986, the same year that I gained my HNC with Distinction in Public Administration. Further promotions followed and by December 1998 I was a Senior Executive Officer in the Chief Secretary’s Office - today called Cabinet Office - where I undertook two separate job roles in my time there.

By this stage recruitment to CEO posts had matured and involved an “Assessment Centre” as well as formal interview. The Assessment Centre included such elements as psychometric testing, critical problem solving and an interview with an HR psychologist. It was being subject to that regime that preceded my appointment to CEO of the Department of Home Affairs in 2001, being the first of my two CEO posts, and it was a very similar process in 2003 when I joined DHSS,  just after completing all my assignments within the UK Civil Service Top Management  Programme. I remained with DHSS/Department of Health for 11 years until my retirement on 31 March 2014 after a 38 year career.

So... no “special pass”, no “exam failed more than once”, just the exams/qualifications asked for by the organisation. And, not least, the pleasure of working with some great people.

I’m  happy to put the record straight, as you’ve taken such a keen interest.

Kind regards

David Killip

 

Well said David

Too many on here think they know it all, but know little.:thumbsup:

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2 hours ago, David K said:

Hello Mr. PB

A family member has alerted me to your posts and as your observations are not correct, it’s only fair that I correct them for you.

I joined the civil service on 17th May 1976 with 4 GCE “O” levels (I subsequently gained a fifth) which allowed me to join as a Clerical Assistant - the  most junior rank - for which 3 O levels were required. (Sadly, no “special pass” for me to avoid entry requirements as you suggested in another of your posts). In order to be eligible for promotion to Clerical Officer I was required to pass a civil service exam and, having done so at the first attempt, was promoted to CO in late 1977. For advancement to Executive Officer a further “EO” exam pass was required (it isn’t these days) in an exam that was close in nature and content to an “A” level. Having passed this exam, also at the first attempt, I was promoted to Executive Officer in December 1986, the same year that I gained my HNC with Distinction in Public Administration. Further promotions followed and by December 1998 I was a Senior Executive Officer in the Chief Secretary’s Office - today called Cabinet Office - where I undertook two separate job roles in my time there.

By this stage recruitment to CEO posts had matured and involved an “Assessment Centre” as well as formal interview. The Assessment Centre included such elements as psychometric testing, critical problem solving and an interview with an HR psychologist. It was being subject to that regime that preceded my appointment to CEO of the Department of Home Affairs in 2001, being the first of my two CEO posts, and it was a very similar process in 2003 when I joined DHSS,  just after completing all my assignments within the UK Civil Service Top Management  Programme. I remained with DHSS/Department of Health for 11 years until my retirement on 31 March 2014 after a 38 year career.

So... no “special pass”, no “exam failed more than once”, just the exams/qualifications asked for by the organisation. And, not least, the pleasure of working with some great people.

I’m  happy to put the record straight, as you’ve taken such a keen interest.

Kind regards

David Killip

 

with that wealth of experience what do you see as the main problem with the running of the health service nowadays david? 

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12 minutes ago, the stinking enigma said:

with that wealth of experience what do you see as the main problem with the running of the health service nowadays david? 

Can I second guess that and say political interference.

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10 minutes ago, MrPB said:

I sort of knew that would solicit a response from you. 

Isn’t it funny how many peoples’ relatives scan these boards every day ;)

No you didn’t. 

You are now embarrassed by your ignorant posting and are now trying to look smart. BTW you have failed big time :lol:

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2 minutes ago, MrPB said:

I’m not really that bothered what Manx Forums apparently resident angry soap box shouter thinks to be honest. As I said it seems to be stuffed full of pissed off hospital and government workers this forum and little else. If people had to work for a living they wouldn’t be posting there nonsense and paranoid theories here during working hours. 

Are you walking backwards very slowly ?

Give it up , you have been caught out.

BTW I am not at work but on my hols, so sitting in 30 degrees of sunshine reading your shite, while getting tanned.

Edited by dilligaf
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