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Bexit (who the f#*k cares)


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I see old Howard trying his best to force through his let me do what ever i want and ask no questions bill. But that is not what caught me eye, old MR.Boot sayin its the best thing since sliced bread. Seeing that it is suppose to be for amalgamating all the EU laws that we imposed becaise of them clowns in Brussel's and non of this would require work for at least five years Mr.Boot is not looking at leaving the trough any time soon. A bit of a presumption that he will still have his ass on a goverment seat at such a later date, one would think

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The whole Brexit thing is overblown to the point of hysteria in my view, even in the UK.  I'm old enough to remember the days before we were even in the Common Market (as it was called then) and Great

No one knows ..?

I have yet to see anyone say how Brexit will or might effect jobs/pensions/future of the IOM

The whole Brexit thing is overblown to the point of hysteria in my view, even in the UK.  I'm old enough to remember the days before we were even in the Common Market (as it was called then) and Great Britain ticked along quite happily in the 1960s and 70s importing lamb from New Zealand, tea from Ceylon,  coals from Newcastle, and so on.  In the long run of history, Brexit is going to be a flea bite compared to the much bigger problems which are coming down the road like resource depletion and climate change.

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I agree, but so many of these issues are so inter-linked that it's difficult to predict how things may pan out.  For example: lets's say we import 30% of our food from the EU.  So on the face of it, staying in the EU looks advantageous because it gives us access to that food source.  But the food source is hugely dependent on continuing supplies of natural gas to make fertiliser, without which the yields would be much lower.  North Sea gas has been in decline for almost 20 years, and the EU is increasing relying on supplies of Russian gas.  So suppose the Russian gas supplies start to dry up too, from either resource depletion or political action.  Then that EU food supply starts to not look so abundant.  Then maybe EU countries look to replace their own declining food sources by extracting more fish from British waters.  Then staying in the EU begins to look not so advantageous after all.  I'm not saying that's exactly how it will pan out, it's just one of many possibilities which we should be considering.    

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9 minutes ago, BallaDoc said:

I agree, but so many of these issues are so inter-linked that it's difficult to predict how things may pan out.  For example: lets's say we import 30% of our food from the EU.  So on the face of it, staying in the EU looks advantageous because it gives us access to that food source.  But the food source is hugely dependent on continuing supplies of natural gas to make fertiliser, without which the yields would be much lower.  North Sea gas has been in decline for almost 20 years, and the EU is increasing relying on supplies of Russian gas.  So suppose the Russian gas supplies start to dry up too, from either resource depletion or political action.  Then that EU food supply starts to not look so abundant.  Then maybe EU countries look to replace their own declining food sources by extracting more fish from British waters.  Then staying in the EU begins to look not so advantageous after all.  I'm not saying that's exactly how it will pan out, it's just one of many possibilities which we should be considering.    

Some pretty vague what ifs there to justify the Brexit debacle. 

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7 minutes ago, La Colombe said:

Some pretty vague what ifs there to justify the Brexit debacle. 

Decline in natural gas supplies, and therefore crop yields, is a 100% certainty because it's a non-renewable resource and there's nothing equivalent to replace it.  So the only uncertainties are the timescale over which this will occur, and how the various players will react. 

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15 minutes ago, BallaDoc said:

Decline in natural gas supplies, and therefore crop yields, is a 100% certainty because it's a non-renewable resource and there's nothing equivalent to replace it.  So the only uncertainties are the timescale over which this will occur, and how the various players will react. 

No doubt, but I'm struggling to equate that to a good reason for leaving the EU. 

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10 minutes ago, La Colombe said:

No doubt, but I'm struggling to equate that to a good reason for leaving the EU. 

Self determination, sovereignty, control of UK population, control of what people and resources move across UK borders, that sort of thing

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