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Lack Of Road Safety Strategy...

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Was it her that mowed down those two men at the side of the road?

Bloody Women riders!!!

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They were discussing this on Talking Heads today and Stu put his finger right on the spot he said there were loads of laws such as speed limits that were never administered and he was dead right.    The only way to stop or cut down the road kill human and otherwise is to adopt speed cameras and introduce MOT some of the condition that cars and vans, mostly vans, whiz around is is unbelievable.   If the Government really want to make the Island safer roadwise they need to be brave and make unpopular decisions.    Think of all the revenue in speeding fines it would generate and no one could complain because if they obey the limits they would not be penalised, much fairer than whacking road tax up every year.

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23 minutes ago, hissingsid said:

They were discussing this on Talking Heads today and Stu put his finger right on the spot he said there were loads of laws such as speed limits that were never administered and he was dead right.    The only way to stop or cut down the road kill human and otherwise is to adopt speed cameras and introduce MOT some of the condition that cars and vans, mostly vans, whiz around is is unbelievable.   If the Government really want to make the Island safer roadwise they need to be brave and make unpopular decisions.    Think of all the revenue in speeding fines it would generate and no one could complain because if they obey the limits they would not be penalised, much fairer than whacking road tax up every year.

I was with you right up to somebody in government making unpopular decisions. None of the current crop are going to risk losing votes are they?

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32 minutes ago, hissingsid said:

Think of all the revenue in speeding fines it would generate and no one could complain because if they obey the limits they would not be penalised, much fairer than whacking road tax up every year.

They'll still whack road tax up every year regardless....it's a pensions thing....

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Do we have any published recorded evidence of the accidents on the islands roads ?  Uncommonly on the island we have 2 distinct situations that should be analysed separately but the results also looked in comparison to highlight the changes in road usage. In most counties road layouts and speed limits stay the same throughout the year but we have our normal situation with a range on limited and unrestricted speed roads and a period where one of our main roads is made one-way similar to an open road race track and increased speed limits on the remainder of the roads.

From anecdotal reports the number of accidents increases dramatically during the one way period on the mountain road so the biggest safety effect would be to enforce a 50 mph limit on the mountain during TT to stop the racing and people riding/driving beyond their abilities. It might mean that the road remains open for more than a few minutes at a time.

For the remainder of the roads unless a specific accident black spot is identified I would leave the limits but enforce in built up areas as I find the biggest issue some cars driving at 40-45 on open roads but maintaining this speed at they enter towns and villages. 

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12 hours ago, janovic said:

Do we have any published recorded evidence of the accidents on the islands roads ?  Uncommonly on the island we have 2 distinct situations that should be analysed separately but the results also looked in comparison to highlight the changes in road usage. In most counties road layouts and speed limits stay the same throughout the year but we have our normal situation with a range on limited and unrestricted speed roads and a period where one of our main roads is made one-way similar to an open road race track and increased speed limits on the remainder of the roads.

From anecdotal reports the number of accidents increases dramatically during the one way period on the mountain road so the biggest safety effect would be to enforce a 50 mph limit on the mountain during TT to stop the racing and people riding/driving beyond their abilities. It might mean that the road remains open for more than a few minutes at a time.

For the remainder of the roads unless a specific accident black spot is identified I would leave the limits but enforce in built up areas as I find the biggest issue some cars driving at 40-45 on open roads but maintaining this speed at they enter towns and villages. 

You aren’t far off the mark

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According to the MR news ROSPA in the UK have endorsed the proposals . 

UK safety body applauds Manx road safety initiative.

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019 12:17pm

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Focussed aim for Island

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents has applauded the ten year targets set by the Manx Government, to reduce the toll on Island roads.

In the Home Affairs Department's Roads Safety Strategy, running up until 2029, the aim is to cut the number of those in serious or fatal crashes by 40%.

Nick Lloyd, from ROSPA, says that gives local efforts a focused aim. 

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2 hours ago, emesde said:

According to the MR news ROSPA in the UK have endorsed the proposals . 

UK safety body applauds Manx road safety initiative.

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019 12:17pm

658068-1.jpg

Focussed aim for Island

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents has applauded the ten year targets set by the Manx Government, to reduce the toll on Island roads.

In the Home Affairs Department's Roads Safety Strategy, running up until 2029, the aim is to cut the number of those in serious or fatal crashes by 40%.

Nick Lloyd, from ROSPA, says that gives local efforts a focused aim. 

Focused targets made up by thinking of a number.

there is no point in them. Just work tirelessly toward the ambition of zero fatalities

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The roads would be a helluva lot quieter without smart arsed English feckers coming over here telling us how to drive.

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Have we ever done a root cause analysis of fatal and serious accidents? We have small enough numbers to make this possible over a ten year period and yet be meaningful. We all hear about the fatalities but the fact that quite a few happen within speed restricted areas and involve carelessness on behalf of one or two parties. These are always interpreted as an out of control, speed addicted population when this is generally the cause of a minority of incidents!

For example, a car running budget worn shock absorbers, or with the steering geometry out of tolerance, a car with headlights out of adjustment, a road with poor adhesion qualities, a driver who is tired after a long shift? Any of these and more could be the root cause of a serious accident and would not be picked up in a vehicle inspection as the vehicle and driver conform to all legal requirements. Speed can be a contributory factor in any accident but that speed can still be 30mph or less. 

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30 minutes ago, piebaps said:

The roads would be a helluva lot quieter without smart arsed English feckers coming over here telling us how to drive.

You seem to be forgetting it is the English who taught you to drive. Not our fault you have forgotten how to... :flowers:

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21 minutes ago, Max Power said:

Have we ever done a root cause analysis of fatal and serious accidents? We have small enough numbers to make this possible over a ten year period and yet be meaningful. We all hear about the fatalities but the fact that quite a few happen within speed restricted areas and involve carelessness on behalf of one or two parties. These are always interpreted as an out of control, speed addicted population when this is generally the cause of a minority of incidents!

For example, a car running budget worn shock absorbers, or with the steering geometry out of tolerance, a car with headlights out of adjustment, a road with poor adhesion qualities, a driver who is tired after a long shift? Any of these and more could be the root cause of a serious accident and would not be picked up in a vehicle inspection as the vehicle and driver conform to all legal requirements. Speed can be a contributory factor in any accident but that speed can still be 30mph or less. 

I thought that vehicle defects were a relatively minor contributor to accidents on IoM, I believe Derek has posted that on a number of occasions?

Entirely personal opinion? Most of it boils down to sheer bad driving, lack of experience or even poor training. First frost yesterday and the Mountain is shut because somebody couldn't drive to the conditions. Vehicles whose speed and power far exceeds their predecessors of years gone by. But our roads haven't changed. They remain narrow roads and lanes, occasionally difficult to negotiate.

A Driving Test that is now reportedly(?) only 30min in length. Offering little time to check standards or the candidate to make a failure of judgement that could otherwise call their driving into question.

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While I wouldn't like it I can't help thinking some kind of competency review or something might be an idea worth looking at. And building a skid pan. The only time I've ever had a proper skid I ended up in a wall because I didn't really know how to deal with it.

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20 minutes ago, Non-Believer said:

I thought that vehicle defects were a relatively minor contributor to accidents on IoM, I believe Derek has posted that on a number of occasions?

That's the point I'm making, I don't believe that we drill down to the root cause of accidents. The things I listed and more could be root causes but because they do not breach legislation they can be ignored. It's very easy to catagorise incidents and their causes as an all encompassing inability to handle the car or conditions but there could be several  root causes which get ignored.

Cars may be faster today but they tend to handle better, have better brakes and safety aids.  

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1 hour ago, Max Power said:

Have we ever done a root cause analysis of fatal and serious accidents? We have small enough numbers to make this possible over a ten year period and yet be meaningful. We all hear about the fatalities but the fact that quite a few happen within speed restricted areas and involve carelessness on behalf of one or two parties. These are always interpreted as an out of control, speed addicted population when this is generally the cause of a minority of incidents!

For example, a car running budget worn shock absorbers, or with the steering geometry out of tolerance, a car with headlights out of adjustment, a road with poor adhesion qualities, a driver who is tired after a long shift? Any of these and more could be the root cause of a serious accident and would not be picked up in a vehicle inspection as the vehicle and driver conform to all legal requirements. Speed can be a contributory factor in any accident but that speed can still be 30mph or less. 

Max, where is your evidence that it's a minority of accidents caused by excessive speed? 

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