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Rushen Spy

A bunch of bricks

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I've noticed most of the new houses and apartment complexes built over the past few decades have bricks that are very close together, all very neat and regular, with minimal cement. On the other hand, older houses have bricks farther apart and more irregularly laid out.

I am sure people in the olden days were a lot smarter than they are today. Sometimes you wonder why they did certain odd things but all too often you find out there was a practical and time-tested reason for it.

Can  anybody explain why the bricks were this way then and whether newer buildings might suffer for not following these traditional building techniques?

If I had to make a guess, it would like with wood, which expands and compresses with the change in temperature in different seasons, something to do with keeping heat in during winter and cool air in during summer? But those are just guesses. I'd be interested to know the real answer.

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13 minutes ago, Rushen Spy said:

I've noticed most of the new houses and apartment complexes built over the past few decades have bricks that are very close together, all very neat and regular, with minimal cement. On the other hand, older houses have bricks farther apart and more irregularly laid out.

I am sure people in the olden days were a lot smarter than they are today. Sometimes you wonder why they did certain odd things but all too often you find out there was a practical and time-tested reason for it.

Can  anybody explain why the bricks were this way then and whether newer buildings might suffer for not following these traditional building techniques?

If I had to make a guess, it would like with wood, which expands and compresses with the change in temperature in different seasons, something to do with keeping heat in during winter and cool air in during summer? But those are just guesses. I'd be interested to know the real answer.

 

bricks.JPG

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Thank you for taking the time to answer. I appreciate that you're an expert on uniformity and thickness (and 3/4 inch). :lol:

Seriously, though, the text you copied (even if it was from Manx and not Californian regulations) doesn't really answer the underlying question.

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1 minute ago, Rushen Spy said:

Thank you for taking the time to answer. I appreciate that you're an expert on uniformity and thickness (and 3/4 inch). :lol:

Seriously, though, the text you copied (even if it was from Manx and not Californian regulations) doesn't really answer the underlying question.

Being sarcastic does not endear you to anyone.

You asked a question and I tried to help.

God knows why you even asked that question in the first place.

Your likeness to a brick is pretty obvious though. 

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I would assume that most brick walls on buildings are fascias today rather than load bearing structures and may have some bearing on what you are talking about? (I'm far from an expert on building matters)

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On 1/8/2019 at 6:58 PM, Rushen Spy said:

I've noticed most of the new houses and apartment complexes built over the past few decades have bricks that are very close together, all very neat and regular, with minimal cement. On the other hand, older houses have bricks farther apart and more irregularly laid out.

I am sure people in the olden days were a lot smarter than they are today. Sometimes you wonder why they did certain odd things but all too often you find out there was a practical and time-tested reason for it.

Can  anybody explain why the bricks were this way then and whether newer buildings might suffer for not following these traditional building techniques?

If I had to make a guess, it would like with wood, which expands and compresses with the change in temperature in different seasons, something to do with keeping heat in during winter and cool air in during summer? But those are just guesses. I'd be interested to know the real answer.

Maybe its just down to Brickernomics.

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The Central on Douglas Promenade is an interesting one. The bricks are very close mortared and are generally in good condition after over 100 years and in a very exposed spot. However, the new areas such as the walls bordering the site have been built with a similar in colour at least brick, but with thick mortar joints. The clash looks totally shit and destroys the purpose of keeping the original building.

Ahh...The Central. Don't get me started.

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1 minute ago, gettafa said:

The Central on Douglas Promenade is an interesting one. The bricks are very close mortared and are generally in good condition after over 100 years and in a very exposed spot. However, the new areas such as the walls bordering the site have been built with a similar in colour at least brick, but with thick mortar joints. The clash looks totally shit and destroys the purpose of keeping the original building.

Ahh...The Central. Don't get me started.

Were some bricks not champhered, so it appears that more cement was used ?

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Whatever, they don't match, anything like (but no, not chamfered). The Tynwald Building is even worse, plus on that one, there was a banding of Peel sandstone that has been replaced with . . . . plastic. Admittedly you can't tell if you are going past on a galloping horse and txting at the same time, but it is there.

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