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Promenade - Megathread


slinkydevil
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, The Phantom said:

I know that normal railway rails are bolted to wooden sleepers and this will obviously provide some significant isolation against vibration etc.

What do they usually do with 'road' rails like on metro trams etc?  Are they on some sort rubber riser pads or something?

Yes , I watched and noted the changes in working practices as they made progress . As I mentioned above there has been a few changes have happened along the way to try and elimate the issues flagged up.

Edited by Numbnuts
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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, The Phantom said:

I know that normal railway rails are bolted to wooden sleepers and this will obviously provide some significant isolation against vibration etc.

What do they usually do with 'road' rails like on metro trams etc?  Are they on some sort rubber riser pads or something?

Pads and surrounded in some sort of flexible resin type materialimage.thumb.png.0d9990cfe31c1fa969b7e1487d79aa09.png

Edited by ellanvannin2010
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11 minutes ago, The Phantom said:

I know that normal railway rails are bolted to wooden sleepers and this will obviously provide some significant isolation against vibration etc.

What do they usually do with 'road' rails like on metro trams etc?  Are they on some sort rubber riser pads or something?

Well according to this manual from 2008:

All of the second generation tramways built thus far in the UK and Ireland  are characterised by having track forms in which:
• the rails are encapsulated in an elastic polymer material, which serves as both an electrical insulator (against stray current) and a vibration isolator/damper (against noise and vibration)

A lot more interesting things in that section, all of which appear to have been ignored at various times.  Of course they were specifically not supposed to be building a new light rail system, but reinstating a heritage one, but appear to have ended up with something that works for neither.

 

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4 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

Of course they were specifically not supposed to be building a new light rail system, but reinstating a heritage one, but appear to have ended up with something that works for neither.

 

That’s the really impressive bit! 

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29 minutes ago, Two-lane said:

There is the slight EVERY possibility that each winter the rain and salt water will cause the surface of the rails to become corroded.  Each year they will need to be planed down to give a nice smooth surface. Anyone here going to make an estimate of the working life of the rails?

Corrected.

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Two-lane said:

There is the slight possibility that each winter the rain and salt water will cause the surface of the rails to become corroded.  Each year they will need to be planed down to give a nice smooth surface. Anyone here going to make an estimate of the working life of the rails?

You might be right but I hope this is just a one off to remove  corrosion pitting on the rail head due to the rails having been in storage for many years.

You may remember a stretch of track on the MER between Majestic and Boncomptes(or whatever it is now) which was laid with secondhand short 15ft rails  from I think some ex MOD depot. The rails had a rolling date of 1918 and I don't think had been used since then. The pitting on the rail head was awful and took several years to wear away. The racket as you drove along them was loud even on wooden sleepers.

Edited by ellanvannin2010
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21 minutes ago, The Phantom said:

I know that normal railway rails are bolted to wooden sleepers and this will obviously provide some significant isolation against vibration etc.

What do they usually do with 'road' rails like on metro trams etc?  Are they on some sort rubber riser pads or something?

These are the general UK standards... they don't seem to have followed any of them really. 

 

18 minutes ago, Numbnuts said:

No they haven't. The first bit they had but from before the Queens pub they lifted the rails and fitted pads between concrete and rails. Further on they lifted the rails , or lowered the concrete level actually , all to try and reduce noise and vibration levels. 

That's good to know, but without the rails having a rubber compound either side of them it will make little difference. 

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6 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

Well according to this manual from 2008:

All of the second generation tramways built thus far in the UK and Ireland  are characterised by having track forms in which:
• the rails are encapsulated in an elastic polymer material, which serves as both an electrical insulator (against stray current) and a vibration isolator/damper (against noise and vibration)

A lot more interesting things in that section, all of which appear to have been ignored at various times.  Of course they were specifically not supposed to be building a new light rail system, but reinstating a heritage one, but appear to have ended up with something that works for neither.

 

Handy document thanks.  With this manual, I'd be confident of completing the task myself. 

Can't be that dissimilar from watching a Youtube tutorial on bleeding boilers/radiators, fitting taps, tiling etc.  😁

 

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13 hours ago, Numbnuts said:

There planing the top of the rails to help stop the noise . They did it to some of the finished tracks last year and again by guys from across.  

At least that was what Longworth had to say on the matter.

But unless the rails are used continuously they will go rusty and pitted again, so what is the point? The clippity clop of horses hooves on tarmac are louder than the ring that sounds off the rails. 

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I think the big problem they will be facing  is the huge gap on the internal part in the rail ,  this will allow the  existing  much thinner  original  tram wheels  to move considerably  , and we may find different wheels  have to be fitted which  defeats the principal of running a historic Victorian railway , I cant believe there bringing a UK firm to reface and clean the rails , and at significant cost which they will never recover ,

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7 hours ago, Annoymouse said:

But unless the rails are used continuously they will go rusty and pitted again, so what is the point? The clippity clop of horses hooves on tarmac are louder than the ring that sounds off the rails. 

365 day a year horse trams it is then! 😂

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7 minutes ago, Omobono said:

I cant believe there bringing a UK firm to reface and clean the rails , and at significant cost which they will never recover ,

You’d think sandblasting or similar to remove the rust would be enough. 

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Gold is pretty un-reactive.  I think the solution is clearly to make some golden rail covers for the winter. 

Where do I submit my eye-watering consultancy invoice again?

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