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Promenade - Megathread


slinkydevil
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if you look at whats happening on Douglas beach , since the groynes have been removed great sections of sand and shingle  about 100 yards down the beach have been scoured by the tides which run north south and   south north  when the tide turns , at times of big tides  the scour can move as fast as 8 MPH  The groynes actually prevented this scouring effect , but what also is happening is the sand and shingle are being deposited  along the Harris  prom and areas up to the palace hotel , some years ago Murtaghs used a large bulldozer  to take large amounts of sand and gravel back down the beach  back to the areas where the scouring took place , this worked and we had several years with very little storm deposits washed up onto the roadway  also in the winter the seaweed was always left  weil  down the beach to form a natural break for incoming waves and also be benificial to the bird and aquatic life , this gets removed now leaving the beach to form a natural ramp for the waves to wash everything right up onto the promenade and roadway , 

I cant wait for the first real easterly gale to see how inadequet and poorly designed the drains are  and how they will cope , the prom is a disaster in design and shoddy workmanship , the DOI will never be away from it !

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12 hours ago, Asthehills said:

I have only just seen this from MGP

Fast forward to 2:12 and if you aren’t in the group you might not be able to see it.

Yes the biker is at fault, but it‚Äôs also an incredibly stupid bit of road ‚Äúdesign‚ÄĚ

https://www.facebook.com/garry.bolton/videos/595062835620785/?d=n&idorvanity=200853773380449

Seems the biker is (a bit of) a plonker, and the person who published the video can't spell "roundel".

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I have witnessed several drivers clipping the curb  on the inside lane down there , you can see the rubber marks , the whole thing is poorly designed and at night the lighting is very poor ,  never mind in a couple of months it will be covered in sand and debris from the beach and those silly traffic lights  that don't look to be weatherproof , will soon start to  corrode when the salt and sand gets to them , ,an expensive over engineered  disaster !

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13 hours ago, Numbnuts said:

Yes agreed , and you can have a 5 metre plus swell on easily so if onshore its just going to run onto the roadway . I mean whats to stop it ! 

5 meter breaking wave, possibly.  Not swell and not easily.

Generally a breaking wave at the shore will be about double the swell height as it starts to break, it will effectively suck water forming a trough infront of itself.

The biggest wave ever recorded in the Irish Sea proper was at the M2 meteorological buoy to the east of Dublin  with a record significant wave height of 6.6m measured at 18.00 on Monday 16th October 2017 during Hurricane Ophelia, which was widely regarded as the worst storm to affect Ireland in 50 years.

During the same storm other buoys also recorded at M5 - 12.9m and M3 - 13.5m. 

Generally the Irish Sea doesn't get swell that is massive.  It's actually the swell period (the gap between waves) that makes it so treacherous.  We get pretty short periods, so it's almost like a machine gun effect compared to those big slow well spaced open ocean swells you might think of that vessels can leisurely roll over.  

 

The Irish Weather Buoy Network

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18 hours ago, 0bserver said:

It won't raise the sea level but surely having sand/stones up to the walkway gives the waves an easier 'ramp' up?

The sand/stone build up also gives protection to a very old victorian seawall behind which there are tankfuls of shite!

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Hey, the Govt give sandbags to the Castle Mona shops, what more do they want!!!

Was any consideration given in the design of the new prom drainage system to try to alleviate the draining of the over topping???

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57 minutes ago, Kopek said:

Hey, the Govt give sandbags to the Castle Mona shops, what more do they want!!!

Was any consideration given in the design of the new prom drainage system to try to alleviate the draining of the over topping???

Interesting point. Clearly when it over tops the drains are going to fill , if there not blocked , and then where does the water go to get away ?.

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9 minutes ago, 0bserver said:

And just like that a keep left bollard/sign thing has sprouted on the little concrete island thing

There is probably some regulation about signs in the middle of the road being illuminated - but if the granite monoliths are not illuminated, then why should this sign be. (In the background of the photo you can see a lonely traffic cone holding up what what is probably a keep left sign)

It's a pity the motorcyclist didn't hit one of those monoliths - then they would have to put keep left signs on both sides of all of them.

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3 minutes ago, Andy Onchan said:

Longworth will be marching on Tynwald with a placard....

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38 minutes ago, Andy Onchan said:

They tried to palm the vintage transport and Gaiety off on MNH about 10 years ago. Not interested.

Then 6 years ago they sought expressions of interests for charity/private operation of the Villa Gaiety.

No one interested after they see the figures. And yes, there are lots of ‚ÄúFriends‚ÄĚ of the Gaiety, Horse Trams, Steam and Electric Railway, but not enough, on Island, of the right age, fitness, expertise, to actually run and staff.
 

And that’s the difference between IoM and similar schemes in the UK. Catchment area. People will travel 100’s of miles in UK to play trains, trams, theatre. Irish Sea is a barrier.

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2 minutes ago, John Wright said:

And that’s the difference between IoM and similar schemes in the UK. Catchment area. People will travel 100’s of miles in UK to play trains, trams, theatre. Irish Sea is a barrier.

Indeed they do and it will depend on how it's funded. What IOM has is a ready made business that can start operating from day one. Many of the heritage rail operations have evolved from virtually nothing and have cost many millions in the process. I think you underestimate the pull that IOM Heritage transport could have.

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1 hour ago, Andy Onchan said:

Great move by Chris Thomas. Although I wonder how long it will take a charity to get fed up of all the DOI red tape that will be associated with running the horse trams. Or a perhaps charity headed by Longtail will be making a bid for it so that he can still keep his train set? 

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