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Recycling


Dirty Buggane
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27 minutes ago, Ham_N_Eggs said:

They're not "chucking" diesel they're "recycling" it. 

If you go to suez.co.im, under the news section you can find the 2017 annual public report. This shows exactly what is processed, fuel oil (diesel) used, electricity generated, etc.. 

 

I encourage anyone who has any interest in this facility to read this, so they can understand what goes on. 

 

The 2018 report is released in hard copy but doesn't appear to have been put on the website yet. If you look at the reports you can see they are checked by a independant, global auditing firm.. 

 

The 2017 report, which you can see on the website, is very informative as it attempts to dispell many of the local "myths" about the facility. I think a lot of the myths came from postings on this very forum! And cover the subjects of fuel use, (non)importation of wastes, etc. 

 

Regarding 'not producing electricity' for periods of time, the plant shuts down for planned maintenance 2 or 3 times per year, for up to 3 weeks at a time. As you can imagine it would be difficult to perform maintenance "on-line" in a furnace that operates at a minimum of 850.c

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2 hours ago, Max Power said:

I believe that recycling on the island is done more to make people believe that we are doing our bit. All those glass bottles are apparently crushed to go into cement to make it non slip but I'm not sure much else is actually used for anything?

Recycling in general is a bit of a mess on the IOM, predominantly because central government completely shot themselves in the foot with the terms of the arrangement to run the EFW. Government get screwed if the minimum volume is not supplied.

The bottom line fact is there are items in your bin right now which have a UK market value of anywhere from roughly £100 to over £1000 per tonne. The only action required to release that value is to separate them as they’re put in the bin. The alternative is just lob them all in your wheelie bin and you pay best part of £100 / tonne (and rising fast) to burn the same. 

Glass is the least commercially viable bulk material (the reason it’s not shipped off island for full recycling is the value is too low to pay for shipping - it’s the only bulk material this applies to). However I think Corletts charge about £20 / tonne to take it (use it as aggregate / eco sand), vs closer to £100 to send it to EFW, so it’s still in our interest to separate it.

2 hours ago, MrPB said:

There’s been a big thing in the papers this week on UK LAs charging people stupid amounts like £20 to dump a toaster. Then they wonder why people fly tip. Everything government seems to do is a disincentive to recycling or otherwise acting responsibly when dealing with waste. 

I don’t know about UK, but yes, IOM Gov are very conflicted on this subject. 

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8 minutes ago, James Hampton said:

Recycling in general is a bit of a mess on the IOM, predominantly because central government completely shot themselves in the foot with the terms of the arrangement to run the EFW. Government get screwed if the minimum volume is not supplied.

The bottom line fact is there are items in your bin right now which have a UK market value of anywhere from roughly £100 to over £1000 per tonne. The only action required to release that value is to separate them as they’re put in the bin. The alternative is just lob them all in your wheelie bin and you pay best part of £100 / tonne (and rising fast) to burn the same. 

Glass is the least commercially viable bulk material (the reason it’s not shipped off island for full recycling is the value is too low to pay for shipping - it’s the only bulk material this applies to). However I think Corletts charge about £20 / tonne to take it (use it as aggregate / eco sand), vs closer to £100 to send it to EFW, so it’s still in our interest to separate it.

I don’t know about UK, but yes, IOM Gov are very conflicted on this subject. 

You are still very deluded "Scampy". £1000 per ton. Get real. I don't believe that one single penny is made from recycling stuff over here due to the cost of gathering and shipping.

I've seen the figures the Corpy put out, but I've been in that game a bit so please don't believe all the crap about it.

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7 hours ago, dilligaf said:

You are still very deluded "Scampy". £1000 per ton. Get real. I don't believe that one single penny is made from recycling stuff over here due to the cost of gathering and shipping.

I've seen the figures the Corpy put out, but I've been in that game a bit so please don't believe all the crap about it.

This

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9 hours ago, dilligaf said:

You are still very deluded "Scampy". £1000 per ton. Get real. I don't believe that one single penny is made from recycling stuff over here due to the cost of gathering and shipping.

I've seen the figures the Corpy put out, but I've been in that game a bit so please don't believe all the crap about it.

£1000 per tonne is not ‘my’ figure. 

All of the data on the current price of collected material is available from several very good independant websites. You can of course phone up buyers in the UK to check what you would actually get, which I have also done. 

Of course I appreciate the point that a price in the UK is not a price on the IOM, however there are still several businesses on the IOM who will buy your sorted material and then sell it in the UK, some of them have been in business for a long time and as far as I’m aware they get no government support. 

I don’t believe anything until I check it myself, and I have. You are wrong. 

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If government are serious about recycling and indeed if it is viable to do so , even if it is cost neutral, then they should provide households with a second bin, in which specified recyclable materials could be placed and collected. To expect everyone to go an amenities site and have the space to store the stuff in the meantime means lots will go in the bin !

Having just been away and seen this in action it is amazing how little cannot be recycled, although I acknowledge our geographical location may make some of that impossible.

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2 hours ago, the stinking enigma said:

you are not wasting your time as long as you get a good feeling at the end of it.

Only because I think its being reused/recycled, It does take up a fair amount of time because I wash the empties, peel the labels off and take off the caps. If I found out I put this effort in to find out they go into the incinerator I would be raging, as I wouldn't have to worry about labels/caps or even washing them out.

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9 minutes ago, Annoymouse said:

Only because I think its being reused/recycled, It does take up a fair amount of time because I wash the empties, peel the labels off and take off the caps. If I found out I put this effort in to find out they go into the incinerator I would be raging, as I wouldn't have to worry about labels/caps or even washing them out.

Start raging!

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12 hours ago, James Hampton said:

£1000 per tonne is not ‘my’ figure. 

All of the data on the current price of collected material is available from several very good independant websites. You can of course phone up buyers in the UK to check what you would actually get, which I have also done. 

Of course I appreciate the point that a price in the UK is not a price on the IOM, however there are still several businesses on the IOM who will buy your sorted material and then sell it in the UK, some of them have been in business for a long time and as far as I’m aware they get no government support. 

I don’t believe anything until I check it myself, and I have. You are wrong. 

Maybe you can share some of your "very good independant [sic] websites" ..

The one I found is http://www.wrap.org.uk/content/plastic which seems quite comprehensive and lists things like mixed polymer bottles at £52.50 per tonne and coloured PET at £27.50 per tonne just to quote a couple of examples ...

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2 hours ago, Owen said:

Maybe you can share some of your "very good independant [sic] websites" ..

The one I found is http://www.wrap.org.uk/content/plastic which seems quite comprehensive and lists things like mixed polymer bottles at £52.50 per tonne and coloured PET at £27.50 per tonne just to quote a couple of examples ...

Wrap is a good one.

If you click on the metals section you will see that the average price for Ali cans was just over £1000/tonne in 2018. Just under at present, but that’s the average for last few years.

If you click on paper you’ll see that the news & PAM price is just under £100 on average (this is the largest material sector by weight in most domestic bins).

HDPE averages about £400 per tonne - this is the largest plastic sector by weight. Probably third overall behind glass and paper. 

Thank you for confirming that the range I quoted is correct. 

Edited by James Hampton
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