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Terry Cringle IOM newspapers..

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2 hours ago, Bobbie Bobster said:

What about McDonald's, what were their hiring practices like?

On the principle of can't afford to be too fussy, one would think. Not the greatest job in the world is it?

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3 hours ago, Stu Peters said:

but I despair of this current move towards tick box employment policy.

Perhaps it is because those doing the hiring do not have the 'skillset' to pick out the best candidate on a personal interview???

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11 minutes ago, Kopek said:

Perhaps it is because those doing the hiring do not have the 'skillset' to pick out the best candidate on a personal interview???

I don't think so. I've been in the room while candidates were picked and they just bluff through it to pick the candidate they already had in mind. The introduction of all this affirmative action BS hasn't made much if any difference. Which is why I'm somewhat bemused by Stu Peters' comment about it. I guess he just automatically thinks any woman hired for a job is only picked due to affirmative action and not because they're simply better qualified than him.

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Thanks for agreeing with me, even if you didn't intend to do so.

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Just now, Kopek said:

Thanks for agreeing with me, even if you didn't intend to do so.

I did intend to do so, and to trick total low IQ idiots into doing so. xx

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2 hours ago, Rushen Spy said:

I don't think so. I've been in the room while candidates were picked and they just bluff through it to pick the candidate they already had in mind. The introduction of all this affirmative action BS hasn't made much if any difference. Which is why I'm somewhat bemused by Stu Peters' comment about it. I guess he just automatically thinks any woman hired for a job is only picked due to affirmative action and not because they're simply better qualified than him.

That's never happened, although of course it could and I'm fine with that. I tend to get jobs I'm keen on. I left school at 16 with useless O'Level results and was told by the careers office that my only options were to be an apprentice toolmaker at Massey Ferguson or an apprentice Queen Anne leg turner at Priory furniture. I got a job working on two trade magazines and after a year moved to my first advertising agency. Seven years later I decided I wanted to work in the recording studio I used to make the Woolworth's radio commercials I wrote and succeeded. Within three years I was a main board director. I then decided to risk it all and become self employed and made a success of it for 15 years, before my biggest client went bust and dragged me down with them. When I moved here for a clean start I nagged Manx Radio to give me a shot and offered to work for nothing to start off - it took lots of persistence to eventually make that happen so I drove a taxi for a year. I also owned a coffee shop for five years, which cost me more than it made but provided jobs for maybe a dozen people. But at no point did I ever blame anyone for dealing me a tough hand, or allege that 'the system' is what stopped me from being a millionaire. I made some good choices and some bad ones, but at least I tried, and truly believe that drive, ambition, persistence and making the best of whatever situation unfolds is a far preferable plan to sitting on my arse blaming the world for whatever injustice presents as an excuse.

I expect Terry Cringle (getting back on track) shares similar values.

Edited by Stu Peters
Typos
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23 hours ago, woolley said:

The quality of journalism and even the basic quality of writing has declined alarmingly in recent decades. Some of those writing professionally today would have been rejected as borderline illiterate back in the day.

What really annoys me with both print and online news media is the way it is presented. Most, if not all, newspapers are unable to string more than two sentences per paragraph when telling the story. Quite often a paragraph contains just a single sentence. Do editors think that we're not capable of reading more than two sentences of text in order to understand what the story is about?

(there, I've managed two and bit lines with three sentences!)

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1 hour ago, Andy Onchan said:

What really annoys me with both print and online news media is the way it is presented. Most, if not all, newspapers are unable to string more than two sentences per paragraph when telling the story. Quite often a paragraph contains just a single sentence. Do editors think that we're not capable of reading more than two sentences of text in order to understand what the story is about?

(there, I've managed two and bit lines with three sentences!)

You're overthinking it, Andy. The reality is more prosaic. They simply can't do it anymore. The art is practically extinct and, worse, the modern pretenders aren't even aware of the shortcomings they display. 

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15 hours ago, Stu Peters said:

In a parallel universe, people are hired entirely on their skillset, competence and attitude - irrespective of race, gender, sexuality, people they know or political affinity.

Sadly we seem to be galloping inexorably away from that. I'm all for creating equal opportunities (especially for Manx people in the Isle of Man) but I despair of this current move towards tick box employment policy.

see radio 2..........

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He’s done a fine service to the newspapers and to the Island has Terry Cringle and he’ll be a hard act to follow when he decides to bow out. My only wish is that he decides to go before it all goes tits up. One mistake is acceptable, a series is not and I’ve no wish to see a repetition of a situation such as that of Bernie Quayle attempting to run a radio show long after he was capable of doing so. It may have had it’s funny moments but it made for painful listening toward the end.  

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Maybe it is time to bring someone in to shadow TC, proof read what is going out, sort the emails, learn the tools of the trade etc.

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2 hours ago, woolley said:
3 hours ago, Andy Onchan said:

What really annoys me with both print and online news media is the way it is presented. Most, if not all, newspapers are unable to string more than two sentences per paragraph when telling the story. Quite often a paragraph contains just a single sentence. Do editors think that we're not capable of reading more than two sentences of text in order to understand what the story is about?

You're overthinking it, Andy. The reality is more prosaic. They simply can't do it anymore. The art is practically extinct and, worse, the modern pretenders aren't even aware of the shortcomings they display. 

This is mostly wrong i think.  This sort of simplification has been going on for a long time.  You only have to look at the way that Manx Radio's online stories nearly all fit a very rigid formula of five paragraphs (the first a summary) of one sentence each, followed by a 20 second clip from a radio interview.  This has been how Manx Radio has reported its online stories for as long as I can remember, no matter how simple or complex they are. 

You actually do need skills to summarise stories in this way, so you can't say that the 'art' is extinct.  It's just whether it should be done like this in the first place.  But the succession of simplified sentences has been the way of writing new stories for most of the 20th century.  It's partly because of narrow print columns in newspapers and partly because of the growth in literacy at the end of the 19th century and a feeling that stories had to be written so everyone could understand them.

Newspapers and similar have been famous for their typos for a long time - there never was a golden age of beautiful writing, impeccable grammar and correctly checked facts.  It's true the disappearance of sub-editors has meant that more may get through, but that is compensated for (a bit) by technology such as spelling and grammar checking.

Obviously you would hope that more experienced reporters would be better at their job after decades than someone just starting out.  But in the end when you consider how many words they are expected to churn out, the mistake rate is relatively low.  The real problem is the reduction in the number of journalists and the casualisation of the trade (this is a UK-wide problem).  It's not just that they don't have the time to write expressively, they aren't able to do the even more-time-consuming research either.  Terry Cringle can spend a week writing a column because it's more of a hobby  than anything, but professional reporters haven't the time and freelancers can't afford to either - they'll still be paid the same whether they do an adequate or superb job.  That applies to all generations of those who work in the media.

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