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MOT's on the way?

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3 hours ago, Rog said:

I'm only too well aware of commuting distances and the relatively short distance of commuting on the island but the condition of the vast majority of the roads over there is a whole lot better than on the island now plus the salt laden atmosphere does result in greater corrosion not just for bodywork (which on even relatively modern cars is vastly improved because of metal treatments during manufacture)  but also on suspension parts.

As for brakes, discs do corrode too. In the case of my car if I've not used it for even just a few days in the winter for the first hundred metres or so the brakes have a noticeable roughness untill the surface has been cleaned up by the brake pads. With the higher humidity on the island added to airborne salt brake disc surface contamination will be worse.  That will result in faster brake pad wear.  Same for tyres. They age especially when being used in wet conditions.  There's moves afoot to include tyre age as being a factor in the MOT as under it should.

If there is continuing rejection on having an MOT style test on the island then that's your funeral but the real issue concerns the legal requirement for vehicles driven on OUR roads to have a valid MOT or equivalent test.  The Vienna ruling concerns licensing and registration. The EU and so British legislation concerning mechanical inspection is an entirely separate matter.

What you think the legal situation is has become irrelevant to this thread as you haven't got the balls to post the correspondence you claim to have received. That tells us all we need to know on that point. It's not like you're dealing in state secrets, you claim to be trying to clarify a pre-existing requirement. If you really were trying to fix a problem you would be more than willing to show the emails and addresses. 

Even accepting different methodologies the data points to the fact that regular testing does not reduce the rate of accidents caused by defects - which is the stated purpose. 

Another European report focused on commercial vehicles (but citing other reports covering all sectors) and puts the potential rate even higher, at 2.5 to 9% in areas where tests are already used!

https://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/sites/roadsafety/files/pdf/projects_sources/autofore_final_report.pdf   

If the objective is reduction in accident rates annual testing is not the answer, that much is clear. 
 

 

 

 

Edited by maynragh

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19 minutes ago, maynragh said:

What you think the legal situation is has become irrelevant to this thread as you haven't got the balls to post the correspondence you claim to have received. That tells us all we need to know on that point. It's not like you're dealing in state secrets, you claim to be trying to clarify a pre-existing requirement. If you really were trying to fix a problem you would be more than willing to show the emails and addresses. 

Even accepting different methodologies the data points to the fact that regular testing does not reduce the rate of accidents caused by defects - which is the stated purpose. 

Another European report focused on commercial vehicles (but citing other reports covering all sectors) and puts the potential rate even higher, at 2.5 to 9% in areas where tests are already used!

https://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/sites/roadsafety/files/pdf/projects_sources/autofore_final_report.pdf   

If the objective is reduction in accident rates annual testing is not the answer, that much is clear. 
 

 

 

 

It's not a question of not having the balls to do anything. As I've pointed out all that I have is accepting that I have raised the matter and then two following telling me that my question has been escalated. The last said that there would be a 20 day delay on a finding..

 

However -- the issue is as to if a car brought from the island must have an MOT before being legally driven on our roads, or in the case of cars that have not passed an EU MOT equivalent can legally be driven on our roads.

Surely that's not too difficult to understand?

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4 hours ago, Rog said:

I'm only too well aware of commuting distances and the relatively short distance of commuting on the island but the condition of the vast majority of the roads over there is a whole lot better than on the island now plus the salt laden atmosphere does result in greater corrosion not just for bodywork (which on even relatively modern cars is vastly improved because of metal treatments during manufacture)  but also on suspension parts.

As for brakes, discs do corrode too. In the case of my car if I've not used it for even just a few days in the winter for the first hundred metres or so the brakes have a noticeable roughness untill the surface has been cleaned up by the brake pads. With the higher humidity on the island added to airborne salt brake disc surface contamination will be worse.  That will result in faster brake pad wear.  Same for tyres. They age especially when being used in wet conditions.  There's moves afoot to include tyre age as being a factor in the MOT as under it should.

If there is continuing rejection on having an MOT style test on the island then that's your funeral but the real issue concerns the legal requirement for vehicles driven on OUR roads to have a valid MOT or equivalent test.  The Vienna ruling concerns licensing and registration. The EU and so British legislation concerning mechanical inspection is an entirely separate matter.

The problem when trolling on a subject you don't actually know much about is that when you get verbose you start to expose your lack of knowledge and logical flaws in your argument.

If I were you, I'd keep it to short, provocative posts.

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47 minutes ago, Bobbie Bobster said:

The problem when trolling on a subject you don't actually know much about is that when you get verbose you start to expose your lack of knowledge and logical flaws in your argument.

If I were you, I'd keep it to short, provocative posts.

Look numbnuts, I'm NOT trolling. 

This is a serious matter and it appears to be something that up to now has slipped between the cracks.  For me untested cars on our roads is something of a cause célèbre (because recently my dil got fined because she'd let the not on her car had expired) and when I noticed the matter of MOT's on the island cropping up there it set me thinking. 

 

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1 minute ago, Rog said:

This is a serious matter and it appears to be something that up to now has slipped between the cracks.  For me untested cars on our roads is something of a cause célèbre (because recently my dil got fined because she'd let the not on her car had expired) and when I noticed the matter of MOT's on the island cropping up there it set me thinking. 

 

Much better.  Personal anecdotes that can't be verified.  Perfect.

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2 hours ago, Rog said:

It's not a question of not having the balls to do anything. As I've pointed out all that I have is accepting that I have raised the matter and then two following telling me that my question has been escalated. The last said that there would be a 20 day delay on a finding..

Chipping in from sidelines but what's the issue of posting a copy of these acknowledgments you claim to have received?

Simply putting up a copy of those would prove that the issue is being looked at, as you claim.

If not, I call bollocks like everyone else

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16 hours ago, maynragh said:

Do we know this? UK average is apparently around 8000 miles a year. Can't find an IOM figure but anyone commuting in and out of Douglas plus a bit of leisure use will easily be doing that. The only major difference would be lack of long distance HGV & similar, which isn't really relevant to the MOT discussion as we have testing for those. 

I don't have any figures, but, say, 10,000 miles per year would probably be considered quite heavy use here and the vast majority will do less.  In he UK it's only just over average.

Indeed the very high vehicle ownership would imply there are an awful lot of cars that are only used as a 'fun' extra vehicle or used a few times a weeks.  Obviously all jurisdictions have some of the proverbial old lady who only drives to church once a week, but there will be a higher percentage of that sort of usage on the Island.  I suspect if you ask car dealers they will give you an idea of the difference and certainly comparing websites tends to show that pattern.

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17 minutes ago, yorik said:

Chipping in from sidelines but what's the issue of posting a copy of these acknowledgments you claim to have received?

Simply putting up a copy of those would prove that the issue is being looked at, as you claim.

If not, I call bollocks like everyone else

Well I don't know how to copy an email onto this or any forum.

 

Here's what I can copy though for what use it will be --- 

Dated  14 Nov from DVSA about driving a Manx registered car on UK roads ---  Thank you for your email. Your query will be dealt with by a member of our team, or passed on to an appropriate person or team, as soon as possible. We will endeavour to reply within our agreed service level of 10 working days. ----

 

Dated Nov 18 th. 

Dear Mr Price

 

 ----Thank you for your email enquiry dated 15 November 2019, concerning driving a Manx car with no UK MOT on UK roads.

 

If you meet the criteria provided by my colleague below on 15 November 2019 you should be ok. However, you may also wish to check with your vehicle Insurance Company. It may also be advisable to carry a copy of your IOM registration document and ferry tickets when travelling in the UK.

 

DVSA can only provide advice for the MOT regulations of vehicles that are MOT tested in England, Scotland or Wales.

 

For information on road legality, you will need to address your enquiry to the Department for Transport, as they deal with the Construction and Use Regulations and Road Law ---

 

(itit doesn't.  Without a valid MOT it CAN'T meet the criteria.  Next came the next mail from a different department who had my query escalated to them.)

 

Then dated 18th   ----- I can confirm that we have received your enquiry and will endeavour to respond within 20 working days ----

 

so no bullshit, but definitely an open issue.  It really does look as if this is a thing that has fallen between the cracks.

up until now anyway.

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4 minutes ago, Bobbie Bobster said:

:lol: Now you've blown it, posting those default email responses.

It was good* while it lasted, Rog!

 

*It was not good

FFS I stated that was all that I had.  Stupid os.

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2 minutes ago, the stinking enigma said:

It's the closest thing you'll get to an actual crusade at your age though rog.

Well I'm going to continue with it until I get a definitive answer from our authorities over here.

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5 hours ago, Rog said:

Well I don't know how to copy an email onto this or any forum.

 

Here's what I can copy though for what use it will be --- 

Dated  14 Nov from DVSA about driving a Manx registered car on UK roads ---  Thank you for your email. Your query will be dealt with by a member of our team, or passed on to an appropriate person or team, as soon as possible. We will endeavour to reply within our agreed service level of 10 working days. ----

 

Dated Nov 18 th. 

Dear Mr Price

 

 ----Thank you for your email enquiry dated 15 November 2019, concerning driving a Manx car with no UK MOT on UK roads.

 

If you meet the criteria provided by my colleague below on 15 November 2019 you should be ok. However, you may also wish to check with your vehicle Insurance Company. It may also be advisable to carry a copy of your IOM registration document and ferry tickets when travelling in the UK.

 

DVSA can only provide advice for the MOT regulations of vehicles that are MOT tested in England, Scotland or Wales.

 

For information on road legality, you will need to address your enquiry to the Department for Transport, as they deal with the Construction and Use Regulations and Road Law ---

 

(itit doesn't.  Without a valid MOT it CAN'T meet the criteria.  Next came the next mail from a different department who had my query escalated to them.)

 

Then dated 18th   ----- I can confirm that we have received your enquiry and will endeavour to respond within 20 working days ----

 

so no bullshit, but definitely an open issue.  It really does look as if this is a thing that has fallen between the cracks.

up until now anyway.

The Price isn’t always right eh ?

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