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Not another NHS overspend..Yawn..


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Some acknowledgement has to be given the fact that generally people are living longer, more treatments are becoming available, and understandably, many people want every change in their health status checked out for fear it is something sinister. This is driven in part by the public health messages based around improving awareness and media stories of people ignoring a particular symptom and prematurely facing the grim reaper. Reluctantly perhaps, but the fact has to be recognised that our bodies are not designed to live forever and certain lifestyles, coupled to a range of environmental factors (e.g. pollution) impact on its ability to remain disease free forever.

Added to which, due to litigation, the medical profession is increasing being forced into having to adopt defensive medicine approaches to their daily practices so, if sued, they can stand up in court and show despite having carried out tests A, B & C, and scans X & Y, the untimely departure of the patient was due to factors outside their control. Such wide scale testing takes time and money and can mean delays in getting results, but also often means some people are being tested for things they may have, including what they may be actually suffering from.

While it may be unpalatable to some, medicine is an art not a science (though based on scientific principles) and each of us is a chemical factory that deals differently with what we put into our bodies and the lifestyle we lead. Add into the mix some genetically inherited aspects, and the fact that many people are now living into their 80's and beyond is quite an achievement.

No matter how much money is given to health services it will never be enough to meet an increasingly insatiable patient led demand. Also bear in mind that over 70% of the routine cost of care in acute hospitals is salaries and wages. Our geographical isolation means to get good medical people costs more as they are often sacrificing considerable career opportunities such as working in teaching hospitals or being involved in research as opposed to routine working in district general hospital such as Nobles. Further, with the population size of the IOM, gifted clinicians do not get to see the wide range of particular conditions in a population of 85,000 as they do in a population of several million.  Also, as is found with other occupations on the Island where there is a shortage of staff, not all families settle easily into the IOM for a range of factors that our politicians appear to fail to grasp or are willing to address.

At the end of the day, perhaps 'carp diem' is the best mantra to adopt, as one day all of us will be leaving the mortal coil.

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26 minutes ago, Galen said:

Some acknowledgement has to be given the fact that generally people are living longer, more treatments are becoming available, and understandably, many people want every change in their health status checked out for fear it is something sinister. This is driven in part by the public health messages based around improving awareness and media stories of people ignoring a particular symptom and prematurely facing the grim reaper. Reluctantly perhaps, but the fact has to be recognised that our bodies are not designed to live forever and certain lifestyles, coupled to a range of environmental factors (e.g. pollution) impact on its ability to remain disease free forever.

Added to which, due to litigation, the medical profession is increasing being forced into having to adopt defensive medicine approaches to their daily practices so, if sued, they can stand up in court and show despite having carried out tests A, B & C, and scans X & Y, the untimely departure of the patient was due to factors outside their control. Such wide scale testing takes time and money and can mean delays in getting results, but also often means some people are being tested for things they may have, including what they may be actually suffering from.

While it may be unpalatable to some, medicine is an art not a science (though based on scientific principles) and each of us is a chemical factory that deals differently with what we put into our bodies and the lifestyle we lead. Add into the mix some genetically inherited aspects, and the fact that many people are now living into their 80's and beyond is quite an achievement.

No matter how much money is given to health services it will never be enough to meet an increasingly insatiable patient led demand. Also bear in mind that over 70% of the routine cost of care in acute hospitals is salaries and wages. Our geographical isolation means to get good medical people costs more as they are often sacrificing considerable career opportunities such as working in teaching hospitals or being involved in research as opposed to routine working in district general hospital such as Nobles. Further, with the population size of the IOM, gifted clinicians do not get to see the wide range of particular conditions in a population of 85,000 as they do in a population of several million.  Also, as is found with other occupations on the Island where there is a shortage of staff, not all families settle easily into the IOM for a range of factors that our politicians appear to fail to grasp or are willing to address.

At the end of the day, perhaps 'carp diem' is the best mantra to adopt, as one day all of us will be leaving the mortal coil.

Common sense at last. 

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