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Patient centred

Anyone know why Tescos in Douglas is so poorly managed?

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2 hours ago, Patient centred said:

Not sure this is true. I once ordered my weekly shop on line for pick up only to discover that the tescos here doesn’t do that and I had mistakenly ordered in ireland. I then filled my trolley with the same stuff using the receipt  ( my way of reducing impulse buying) and the cost was 30% more. 
that is significant. I can’t get a family shop done now for a week for under £110

Something wrong there. We frequent Tesco here and in the UK. Many items are the same price. If there is the odd discrepancy it is certainly nothing like30%. From our experience the difference for a shop is small. Certainly less than 5%  

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Just now, Neil Down said:

If everybody sensibly did that John then this thread wouldn't have started... :thumbsup:

On the contrary it's because all the slots are being taken up by weekly deliveries to sensible, organised people like John, that there's a shortage for others.  The simple truth is that Tesco aren't really incentivised to increase the number of slots because it doesn't pay them to - the delivery charges don't really cover the costs of the service[1].  It only really works to obtain the custom of people who probably wouldn't or couldn't shop in person. 

The same thing would be true incidentally if they were allowed the expansion that they wanted.  Indeed with increased retail floor space there would be more reason to try get people to come in person.

 

[1]  I also suspect that online shopper will be cannier (and so less profitable), able to assess special offers and alternatives and especially resist impulse buys.  And no opportunity for little Ollie to put extra items in the trolley.

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They even did the 19p Christmas veg promotion here which was part of a UK price war. They had no need to extend it to IOM whatsoever. 

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3 minutes ago, woolley said:

Something wrong there. We frequent Tesco here and in the UK. Many items are the same price. If there is the odd discrepancy it is certainly nothing like30%. From our experience the difference for a shop is small. Certainly less than 5%  

I suspect that it's euro prices being compared to UK pound ones which might explain the difference, depending on when it was.  In real terms Irish prices tend to be a bit higher, not least because of VAT on more goods.

1 minute ago, woolley said:

They even did the 19p Christmas veg promotion here which was part of a UK price war. They had no need to extend it to IOM whatsoever. 

I think they know there will be complaints, even if legally they are correct.  You don't want people turning up, finding the promised cheap sprouts aren't there and storming off without doing the rest of the shopping.  They will tend to maintain parity on special offers even if there's a default 5% mark up for the Island.  Mind you the offer made little sense because people usually buy veg last at Christmas, so they've already got all the other expensive stuff you're trying to lure them in for.

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6 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

On the contrary it's because all the slots are being taken up by weekly deliveries to sensible, organised people like John, that there's a shortage for others.  The simple truth is that Tesco aren't really incentivised to increase the number of slots because it doesn't pay them to - the delivery charges don't really cover the costs of the service[1].  It only really works to obtain the custom of people who probably wouldn't or couldn't shop in person. 

The same thing would be true incidentally if they were allowed the expansion that they wanted.  Indeed with increased retail floor space there would be more reason to try get people to come in person.

 

[1]  I also suspect that online shopper will be cannier (and so less profitable), able to assess special offers and alternatives and especially resist impulse buys.  And no opportunity for little Ollie to put extra items in the trolley.

I’m not sure about there being no incentivisation.
 

The slot charges are demand led, with peak times and days being up to £6. Im assuming they’re averaging 6 drops an hour and that the cages in the vans hold 4 hours worth of deliveries. Refilled 3 times a day.

Not sure how much they pay drivers and pickers.

Home delivery increases market penetration, turn over, utilises staff at quiet times and reduces personal shoppers at peak times, improving in store congestion.

They get shoppers who otherwise would use Shoprite in Peel, Ramsey and the South.

Most of all there’s a huge demand for the convenience. I don’t get the idle or lazy accusation. I get my milk, butter and eggs delivered by the milkman, and as a child I recall a mobile fish van, butchers and greengrocers calling weekly.

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58 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

I suspect that it's euro prices being compared to UK pound ones which might explain the difference, depending on when it was.  In real terms Irish prices tend to be a bit higher, not least because of VAT on more goods.

I think they know there will be complaints, even if legally they are correct.  You don't want people turning up, finding the promised cheap sprouts aren't there and storming off without doing the rest of the shopping.  They will tend to maintain parity on special offers even if there's a default 5% mark up for the Island.  Mind you the offer made little sense because people usually buy veg last at Christmas, so they've already got all the other expensive stuff you're trying to lure them in for.

There certainly is no default 5% mark up for the Island. As I said, we frequent UK and IOM stores regularly and so many items are exactly the same in both. Whatever differentials there may be are far more subtle than that and not uniform. We've even seen stuff cheaper here than there within days.

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1 hour ago, John Wright said:

I’m not sure about there being no incentivisation.
 

The slot charges are demand led, with peak times and days being up to £6. Im assuming they’re averaging 6 drops an hour and that the cages in the vans hold 4 hours worth of deliveries. Refilled 3 times a day.

Not sure how much they pay drivers and pickers.

Home delivery increases market penetration, turn over, utilises staff at quiet times and reduces personal shoppers at peak times, improving in store congestion.

They get shoppers who otherwise would use Shoprite in Peel, Ramsey and the South.

Most of all there’s a huge demand for the convenience. I don’t get the idle or lazy accusation. I get my milk, butter and eggs delivered by the milkman, and as a child I recall a mobile fish van, butchers and greengrocers calling weekly.

Some of that will certainly be true in the UK but less so here.  I can't see them getting 6 deliveries an hour on average - average customer contact must be 5-10 minutes and there all the driving, parking, waiting and so on to consider.  They will have a larger area to deliver to as well, while in the UK, Tescos are nearer each other.  And the labour market here will mean less flexibility and possibly higher costs.  You'd be pushed to get £6 to cover the average cost of those and many slots will be cheaper.

They must lose money on the service and it only works so as to prevent customer loss to Shoprite who don't offer the service.  But there's no real incentive to increase to number of slots once the have-to-haves are covered.

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On 1/28/2020 at 1:26 PM, MrPB said:

They’re now up to 4 weeks in advance for home deliveries too. Tesco here is a right bag of crap but you assume lack of adequate competition means that they can get away with such shoddy service. 

Why don`t Shoprite, Spar, or the Co-op do home deliveries ?, there is obviously a market for it on the island.

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1 hour ago, LightBulb said:

Why don`t Shoprite, Spar, or the Co-op do home deliveries ?, there is obviously a market for it on the island.

Shoprite: Can't be arsed, that would involve redoing their entire IT infrastructure
Spar: The idea with Spar is that people come to them as is convenient
Co-op: Would need redoing their entire UK IT infrastructure to cope.

We're lucky to have Tesco.

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1 hour ago, Manxberry said:

Spar: The idea with Spar is that people come to them as is convenient

Yet Spar is also owned by the Brewery which also owns a massive haulage and distribution company. 

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34 minutes ago, Grounds Keeper Willy said:

Yet Spar is also owned by the Brewery which also owns a massive haulage and distribution company. 

None of which are suitable for home deliveries...

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36 minutes ago, Grounds Keeper Willy said:

They run more vehicles and have more capacity than Tescos.

http://tradedistributionltd.com/our-history/

They may have more heavy vehicles but none suitable for home deliveries. Can't imagine anybody being happy with a 40ft articulated lorry turning up to deliver their weekly shop

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