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Ex cop admits nicking £60k


thesultanofsheight
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12 hours ago, buncha wankas said:

Do they get to keep pension benefits if found guilty.

(i) they are convicted of an offence committed in connection with their police service; and (ii) which is certified by the Department of Home Affairs either to have either been:  gravely injurious to the interests of the State; or  to be liable to lead to a serious loss of confidence in the public service.

Seems they generally do unless certain conditions apply. With Mr Williams it is arguable that he falls in the the above category, though how you measure the loss of confidence or its likelihood is beyond me.

 

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1 hour ago, Apple said:

How can you actually measure public confidence in a public service following the reports and events this week? So dismayed it is unbelievable. 

By reminding yourself that the majority of men and women in public service are decent honest people. 
 

Just as in all areas of life there are the ones that slip through the net. 
 

Personally, I’m more concerned about the events after. If this had been a bin man he’d would have not received this level of understanding. That’s the issue. Always that’s the issue. One rule for one. Old boys’ club. It exists. It shouldn’t. 

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9 hours ago, Rob Taylor said:

(i) they are convicted of an offence committed in connection with their police service; and (ii) which is certified by the Department of Home Affairs either to have either been:  gravely injurious to the interests of the State; or  to be liable to lead to a serious loss of confidence in the public service.

Seems they generally do unless certain conditions apply. With Mr Williams it is arguable that he falls in the the above category, though how you measure the loss of confidence or its likelihood is beyond me.

 

Yes, but part b appears to relate only to active members of the force; if they have already retired, or resigned in anticipation of disciplinary proceedings, I don’t think that this section would apply.  Whereas part a applies to all recipients of pensions, ie inevitably including those already retired from or otherwise having left the force...

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12 hours ago, bankerboy said:

Yes, but part b appears to relate only to active members of the force; if they have already retired, or resigned in anticipation of disciplinary proceedings, I don’t think that this section would apply.  Whereas part a applies to all recipients of pensions, ie inevitably including those already retired from or otherwise having left the force...

it doesn't really matter ( except for helping bent coppers out )  whether they are still active in the force when they face disciplinary proceedings,  if they were active in the force when they committed the offences is what should matter.

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  • 4 weeks later...
18 minutes ago, hissingsid said:

What about Shipman ?   He still got his pension reason given was he paid in and was entitled to it.

No he didn't. His widow did though:

Quote

The [Times] speculated that the 57-year-old former GP may have taken his own life before he turned 60 to exploit a loophole which means his wife will receive a tax-free lump sum of more than £100,000 and an annual pension of £10,000.

If he had lived beyond 60, she would have received only a half-pension of £5,000 a year and no lump sum on his eventual death, according to the newspaper.

Shipman would not have received the money had he lived, as he has been stripped of his NHS pension. However, a Department of Health spokeswoman last night confirmed that following his death "Mrs Shipman will be entitled to a lump sum and continuing widow's pension from the NHS pension scheme.

"Under national health service pension scheme regulations, ministers directed that 100% of Shipman's personal benefits from the NHS pension scheme should be forfeited. However, Mrs Shipman is entitled to the relevant survivor benefits on his death."

I suspect any such loophole has since been plugged.  But it's interesting that UK Ministers can act in such circumstances (or at least could in 2004), can Isle of Man ones?

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2 hours ago, Dave Hedgehog said:

The other case is on the front page of this week's Manx Indy.

Turns out he didn't nick anything. Just helped hide it as part of a bit of good old benefit fraud.

flinty will be along shortly to spin it all in a positive manner  and remind us of how rare these regular occurrences are.

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On 8/11/2020 at 11:30 AM, Roxanne said:

By reminding yourself that the majority of men and women in public service are decent honest people. 
 

Just as in all areas of life there are the ones that slip through the net. 

Personally, I'm of the opposite opinion. I think the majority of people in general are neither decent nor honest. Most people are sociopaths just looking out for themselves and not giving a toss about anybody else. Most have already been corrupted and turned this way even in their teenage years and it just continues from there. Many start out good, but a lot end up joining the rest and become sociopaths as well, to get ahead.

There is only a very small handful of good people (maybe 5% at most) who manage to slip through the net of this horrible society and culture and manage to remain decent and honest until the end.

I think society is like this:-

1% hardcore psychopaths at the top

4% sociopaths who border on psychopathy

90% average sociopaths

5% good people

Edited by ThreeRaccoonsInATrenchCoat
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1 hour ago, ThreeRaccoonsInATrenchCoat said:

Personally, I'm of the opposite opinion. I think the majority of people in general are neither decent nor honest. Most people are sociopaths just looking out for themselves and not giving a toss about anybody else. Most have already been corrupted and turned this way even in their teenage years and it just continues from there. Many start out good, but a lot end up joining the rest and become sociopaths as well, to get ahead.

There is only a very small handful of good people (maybe 5% at most) who manage to slip through the net of this horrible society and culture and manage to remain decent and honest until the end.

I think society is like this:-

1% hardcore psychopaths at the top

4% sociopaths who border on psychopathy

90% average sociopaths

5% good people

You are a clown. You just don’t have the big red nose, baggy trousers or massive shoes. You posts though make up for that.

Edited by dilligaf
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6 hours ago, WTF said:

flinty will be along shortly to spin it all in a positive manner  and remind us of how rare these regular occurrences are.

Here I am!

I have to concede, the body count is racking up at present.

I knew this chap well - decent bloke, did a hell of a lot of charity work too. Not sighted on the details of what he’s been found guilty of. What does surprise me is that no other news agency is reporting the matter? I don’t buy the paper so not up to speed on the case.

 

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