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Isle of Man Food Security Post 2020


James Hampton
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18 hours ago, Manxberry said:

No need for it, there is plenty of food. Those self sufficiency people are always a bit mad - Where do you stop? Does each town need to be self sufficient? Each estate? Each household? It's matryoshka dolls all the way down

If you read the linked UN report it explains why there is food now, and why there might not be in 12 months time. The UN probably have more experience in the field than any other body. If they are warning of potential issues it’s probably worth listening even if we do bounce back from this fairly well financially.

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On 4/1/2020 at 9:31 PM, pongo said:

Food supply chains are standing up perfectly fine though. .

This isn’t about now. It’s about 6-12 months time when the effects of any financial stress and predicted shortages in the agri labour market might be crippling the industry globally. 

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17 hours ago, Albert Tatlock said:

The food chain workers are classed as essential workers. It's business as much as usual for them.

Even prior to Corona the loss of labour as a result of Brexit was predicted to cause major problems for the UK agri industry. Corona essentially multiplies the same problem. 

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17 hours ago, asitis said:

The political reluctance to examine closely the CCS is the product of Gawne and his free money for landowners. The subject was one of the most supported topics in the SAVE initiatives, but didn't even get a cursory look. If ever there was an opportunity to grow an industry and properly support it, it is now.

Take all non economic farming land out of the scheme, take landowners out of the scheme, and target subsidy on food production and farming employment.

A knock on benefit of this would be to remove developers landbanks from public subsidy , which may mean they either return to farming or they re wild, if areas of the island return to the wild so much the better and maybe even be a later draw for wildlife and landscape tourism.

 

 

The reason the old production subsidies were scrapped was because the IOM could no longer keep up with the rest of the world. 

This is still the case. Any return to production subsidy would effectively be money down the drain without market protection.

Market protection on its own would be a far better idea. 

 

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16 hours ago, MadAsHell said:

We could compete with the New Zealand subsidy level. I'm sure Howard would love to go again.

I assume you know they don’t have any production or any other form of agri subsidy in New Zealand, and are very successful without it. One of the only places in the world to prove it can be done - though it is highly reliant on their geographically advantages. Island of less than 10m people producing enough food for 40m. 

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14 hours ago, The Lurker said:

A few thoughts of mine but with the caveat that my farming experience is limited to having a very small allotment so I have no understanding of the practicalities and economics of the situation.

There needs to be a coordinated approach across the whole farming community and penalties for leaving land unnecessarily fallow and land-banking.

No point having every farmer growing spuds; if we're serious about ensuring food security then the whole farming industry needs to come together as possibly one big cooperative to ensure that enough of everything is grown/reared but that no one farmer suffers by being allocated a low-profit crop for that growing season or if their particular patch is only suited to crops that don't command a high price. 

The NIMBY's will also have to get used to the idea of poly-tunnels on a large scale.

As others have said; subsidies linked directly to food production but I'd still like to see land owners rewarded for keeping their land well and in an environmentally conscious manner. 

No tax on Manx produce provided it's passed to or at the very least a fair split  between the farmer, retailer and the end customer. 

Storage/preservation is also something that would have to be looked at to ensure year round supply.

And lastly; get a bloody grip on the slaughterhouse; it is bizarre that Manx raised animals have to be bundled on the boat and sent across to be slaughtered. 

All of this will require the vested interest to start seeing the bigger picture and maybe put community before self. 

Happy to be shot down in flames on this as it's not something I really know about.

All worthy of consideration. The only problem is we don’t have time for consideration now. There are a few more weeks where anything that can be planted must be for it to be available when we might need it. 

If problems drag on longer then a more coordinated approach would clearly help. Right now we just need to get whatever we’ve got in the ground. 

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13 hours ago, Donald Trumps said:

Do you have a view then on how pricing will work?

& could Knockaloe become a green tech trial/development centre for IOM arable farming?

What pricing? The price offered to locals by gov? Find a couple of buyers in the UK, give the price they offer on the day. When you’re ready to sell ship it over. Price may be rising, but grain keeps. Ask a Roman. 

Government giving advice to farmers never really went well when that’s what Knockaloe was supposed to be doing as far as I can remember. Probably be better short term leasing it to young farmers specifically for trialing new methods or crops. 

 

 

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9 hours ago, asitis said:

It is all done in secret that should be a warning flag to any scrutineer. I have no problem giving subsidy to farmers producing food or creating employment in doing so, merely owning land and keeping it tidy should not be a reason to dip into the public purse ! THE CCS in its current form is a disgrace a misuse of public funds it was designed by farmers for farmers and rushed through Tynwald. Like many things it needs the light of day shining on it !

Was opposed by the majority I think. There were quite tense meetings where the industry explained what would happen. 

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8 hours ago, TheTeapot said:

I know that they'd NEVER tel you,but wouldn't it be interesting to know how much money Dandara has received over the years from the CCS. Look at that new estate going up in Ballasalla, how many of those houses are paid for by us?

I'm pretty sure they changed the scheme a few years ago to include what they called an ‘active farmer’ clause. So you cannot just claim for doing nothing. It’s probably not 100% water tight, as with the fact that apparently sometimes the person working the land doesn’t see the CCS money. 

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40 minutes ago, James Hampton said:

What pricing? The price offered to locals by gov? Find a couple of buyers in the UK, give the price they offer on the day. When you’re ready to sell ship it over. Price may be rising, but grain keeps. Ask a Roman. 

Government giving advice to farmers never really went well when that’s what Knockaloe was supposed to be doing as far as I can remember. Probably be better short term leasing it to young farmers specifically for trialing new methods or crops. 

 

 

I think you’ll find that unless you could grow a crop of bungalows the government has preferred to deliver bales of cash to landowners for having land rather than support actual farmers. A fair amount of our land is unsuitable for plowing but perfect for livestock - problem is, we have too many people who’d rather eat flavoured palm oil than lamb, would rather buy whatever the supermarket could make the biggest margin on than local produce, or a plastic wrapped version of something they ate on holiday than in-season fresh food that requires a bit of prep. 

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57 minutes ago, James Hampton said:

I'm pretty sure they changed the scheme a few years ago to include what they called an ‘active farmer’ clause. 

Sir, you could do with doing some research and linking. No point in being a little bit fluffy as it just destroys your point, or just don't make it.

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There will not be a food shortage nor a price spike. It’s all scaremongering again. As far as the Manx farming community growing stuff I would not bet on it. They are not geared up and the U.K. does it more efficiently anyway. Manx farming needs to stick to value added products ( ie niche high value because some people will pay for that and Manx farmers are good at that ).

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4 hours ago, Wilson said:

There will not be a food shortage nor a price spike. It’s all scaremongering again. As far as the Manx farming community growing stuff I would not bet on it. They are not geared up and the U.K. does it more efficiently anyway. Manx farming needs to stick to value added products ( ie niche high value because some people will pay for that and Manx farmers are good at that ).

You mean like holiday cottages and tenant farmers ?

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5 hours ago, gettafa said:

Sir, you could do with doing some research and linking. No point in being a little bit fluffy as it just destroys your point, or just don't make it.

Apologies. You’re right.

https://www.gov.im/categories/business-and-industries/agriculture/agricultural-development-scheme/active-farmer-definition/

I’m a bit blurry at the moment.

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6 hours ago, Freggyragh said:

I think you’ll find that unless you could grow a crop of bungalows the government has preferred to deliver bales of cash to landowners for having land rather than support actual farmers. A fair amount of our land is unsuitable for plowing but perfect for livestock - problem is, we have too many people who’d rather eat flavoured palm oil than lamb, would rather buy whatever the supermarket could make the biggest margin on than local produce, or a plastic wrapped version of something they ate on holiday than in-season fresh food that requires a bit of prep. 

All correct. But I guess such issues are inversely proportional to how much food there actually is. If food is short folks will eat whatever they can get. It’s been very long time since that was a reality here, but the cold fact is there is no plan in place if it does arise.

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