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IOM Covid removing restrictions


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http://www.iomtoday.co.im/article.cfm?id=59450&headline=Concrete dug up to fix faulty welding&sectionIs=news&searchyear=2020&cat=Transport

 

Drive along it and you can see other areas where welds have been dug out, the single lane section has had lines down and pulled up again.

Edited by x-in-man
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53 minutes ago, Max Power said:

Obviously not this sort of welder.

Things change, like regulations regarding processes. 

And setting it up properly, measuring, cutting etc, obviously like most welding, you need to have the correct qualification, otherwise you end up with problems when it all comes apart.

I'd have thought it may have occurred to someone to maybe train a few of our own staff in this method  at some point in the last 130 years. 

Edited by the stinking enigma
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1 hour ago, Itsmeee said:

The buck passing has started already then. It can’t possibly be the fault of the terrible triumvirate.

Remarkable really, far too busy on other things to be focusing on the very point of entry for the virus.  The important thing was to keep the boats going for oxygen!  Didn't we have an oxygen plant commissioned?

I thought the big deal was to keep supplies of everything. 

So, not only are we considered  stupid, but to also have the memory of goldfish.  

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46 minutes ago, the stinking enigma said:

I'd have thought it may have occurred to someone to maybe train a few of our own staff in this method  at some point in the last 130 years. 

Yes, but they are dead now. 

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57 minutes ago, the stinking enigma said:

I'd have thought it may have occurred to someone to maybe train a few of our own staff in this method  at some point in the last 130 years. 

The MER did do it with their own staff back in the 1950s. 

The current management appear not to value experienced and highly qualified local workers. 

Edited by ellanvannin2010
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It’s all to do with having sufficient regular experience to remain current. Like NDT inspection on aircraft. Not enough rail line here unless we are having the tunnel. It is work that is critical and has to be certified to have insurance if something fails. What is wrong with clikity clack?

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Did they used to weld them previously? I was under the impression the Victorians did it some other way , but I might be wrong. I think the welding is imported from high speed rail lines, not at all sure it had been done much or even at all here previously,  which would beg the question why does it need doing now?

Could be wrong though. 

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7 minutes ago, Chris C said:

Did they used to weld them previously? I was under the impression the Victorians did it some other way , but I might be wrong. I think the welding is imported from high speed rail lines, not at all sure it had been done much or even at all here previously,  which would beg the question why does it need doing now?

Could be wrong though. 

Aren't they welding the tracks to future proof it for a modern hi-speed commuter tram?

Or something like that.

 

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17 minutes ago, Major Rushen said:

What is wrong with clikity clack?

It requires a lot more regular maintenance

13 minutes ago, Chris C said:

Did they used to weld them previously? I was under the impression the Victorians did it some other way , but I might be wrong. I think the welding is imported from high speed rail lines, not at all sure it had been done much or even at all here previously,  which would beg the question why does it need doing now?

Could be wrong though. 

You are wrong. 

 

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8 minutes ago, ellanvannin2010 said:

 

You are wrong. 

 

Really? I'm sure a lot of the MER tracks are bolted together.  I'm not sure flash welding was used anywhere in Victorian times, let alone here. I could be wrong though. 

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