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IOM Covid removing restrictions


Filippo

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Ultimately, I think nearly every-one will catch covid over the next couple of years - jabbed or not. Some will not know they have it, some will be ill for a few days, a few will go to hospital and a very small % will die.

Long term, catching covid after the jab can only boost the immune system which is obviously a good thing. It's here to stay, so we'll all have to live with it.

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Anybody who, truly, cannot have the vaccinations must be very vulnerable to all sorts of bugs. They will have to either accept the risks and get out there or choose to live a pretty enclosed and limited life. My question to them (and others) would be, what have they done until now? Worn masks in flu season? Avoided contact with children? Kept out of crowded places?

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Just now, Flyingfemme said:

Anybody who, truly, cannot have the vaccinations must be very vulnerable to all sorts of bugs. They will have to either accept the risks and get out there or choose to live a pretty enclosed and limited life. My question to them (and others) would be, what have they done until now? Worn masks in flu season? Avoided contact with children? Kept out of crowded places?

That’s total nonsense.

Anyone pregnant. No vaccine yet.

Anyone with severe allergic reaction. No vaccine yet.

lots of other contraindications. None of them meaning those people are vulnerable to all sorts of bugs.

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11 minutes ago, winnie said:

Ultimately, I think nearly every-one will catch covid over the next couple of years - jabbed or not. Some will not know they have it, some will be ill for a few days, a few will go to hospital and a very small % will die.

Long term, catching covid after the jab can only boost the immune system which is obviously a good thing. It's here to stay, so we'll all have to live with it.

How many will develop long covid, putting serious strain on our health service in the decades to come? 

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17 minutes ago, doc.fixit said:

Well, we've just spent at least 30 mins trying to find the times of opening for the covid test centre on the govt. site. Still haven't found them! Now maybe it's our fault but why aren't the times right there in front of the searcher? Maybe they are but they are not obvious to us. Like ALL govt. docs they are full of unnecessary descriptions of what they have done.

Make it simple, who, what, where, when, that's all we need!

By the way, what are the opening times of the covid test centre?

8-13

but as you have to book just ring 111. What does it matter what opening hours are. You’ll get what you’re given.

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1 minute ago, HeliX said:

How many will develop long covid, putting serious strain on our health service in the decades to come? 

I don't know, but there will be data. I'd expect a very small percent of self employed people rising to a larger percentage of civil servants / government employees.

If we have to invest more in the health service, then that's what has to happen. 

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14 hours ago, TheTeapot said:

A significant difference between the US and UK is that the US stuck to the recommended dosage schedule as designed by the manufacturers. 

 

14 hours ago, TheTeapot said:

Explain

I will explain

Design is an engineering term. Vaccines are developed by research.

In real layman's terms a vaccine is a substance that, to the human body appears similar enough to the real thing that the bodies reaction is the same. Its akin to training a dog using a stuffed rabbit. Vaccines vary in how they are made and might , for example, be a bit of dead material from the virus or even a semi synthetic bit of material that's near enough to the virus to trigger an immune response.

Anyway, vaccine creators produce a vaccine using research and laboratory testing. This is before starting trials on (sometimes animal first) human volunteers. The testing is to

1) Demonstrate it is safe and

2) Demonstrate it works

The key point though is that, when the vaccine is initially developed, the developers would have no idea what the longevity of the protection would be. Only testing and previous experience can show this. Because we had a global pandemic there was a race against time. This would have put limits on being able to do long term tests (we would still be at it now) and therefore I understand that 6 weeks was the longest period tested and it was found to be very effective.

It has now come to light that periods much greater than 6 week give good longevity. But this has to be balanced against the fact that in the period from 6 weeks to the 2nd vaccinated, the protection starts to wane.

In general, its considered that the best time time to boost/2nd vaccination is just before the first jab starts to wear of. In practice you can't do this because everyone is different and its just not practical.

This is why your statement saying the manufacturers 'designed' the vaccine to have a 6 week period between jabs was incorrect

 

 

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26 minutes ago, John Wright said:

That’s total nonsense.

Anyone pregnant. No vaccine yet.

Anyone with severe allergic reaction. No vaccine yet.

lots of other contraindications. None of them meaning those people are vulnerable to all sorts of bugs.

The very small % you refer to will need to shield for the greater good.

Is that selfish.

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51 minutes ago, doc.fixit said:

Well, we've just spent at least 30 mins trying to find the times of opening for the covid test centre on the govt. site. Still haven't found them! Now maybe it's our fault but why aren't the times right there in front of the searcher? Maybe they are but they are not obvious to us. Like ALL govt. docs they are full of unnecessary descriptions of what they have done.

Make it simple, who, what, where, when, that's all we need!

By the way, what are the opening times of the covid test centre?

its it was open an hour ago

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20 minutes ago, Happier diner said:

 

This is why your statement saying the manufacturers 'designed' the vaccine to have a 6 week period between jabs was incorrect

 

 

I didn't say that bit. 

My point was that the US has followed the evidence the designers/manufactures/whatever had at the time and recommended. I appreciate evidence will change over the longer term and it may bear out that longer gaps are better, but the FACTS are that the US has hammered in the second doses as fast as advised, no messing around ( like changing from 4 to 12 weeks and then back down to 8) and they're finding it much easier to open up as a result.

Edited by TheTeapot
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46 minutes ago, John Wright said:

That’s total nonsense.

Anyone pregnant. No vaccine yet.

Anyone with severe allergic reaction. No vaccine yet.

lots of other contraindications. None of them meaning those people are vulnerable to all sorts of bugs.

That’s total nonsense.  JCVI advise pregnant women get vaccinated with the rest of their age group. Similarly, if allergic to things you can generally have the vaccine, or at least one of them - if not Pfizer then AZ is ok etc.

There are very few who genuinely cannot be vaccinated. 

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