Jump to content

IOM Covid removing restrictions


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 10.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Can you guys start a separate thread titled "Jersey is ace - oh no it isn't" and leave this one to a discussion on IOM and the coronavirus?

It's a safe place right now because of the Manx people, not the Manx politicians. None of us want to be "the person who brought it back" so we isolate and make sure we don't transmit the virus by bein

Ratio of admissions to deaths is not that different, testing is obviously out due to the massive capacity increase like just about everywhere in the world.    The current UK situation is impact

Posted Images

3 minutes ago, TheTeapot said:

I looked it up, the 1% was the percentage of deaths from covid for a single week at the end of August, according to the ons. So about a month after the week with the lowest amount of cases. Taking that stat on its own without proper context is disingenuous at best.

It is amazing how easily people are willing to use this misleading data. Even the data I used is largely meaningless because it doesn't span over 12 months. But it does paint a rather different picture than the 1% figure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, LightBulb said:

If you already had underlying health problems, and contacted general flu, and died of it, would the death then also be recorded as caused by general flu ?

If the flu killed you then yes because death certificates certify the cause of death. What people seem to be conviently forgetting is that the biggest comorbidities are diabetes, being overweight, and heart disease. These are things that people can live with not just for years but for decades. Sometimes in the case of diabetes an entire lifetime. It's not like most of these people were about to die the next day. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Ham_N_Eggs said:

It is amazing how easily people are willing to use this misleading data. Even the data I used is largely meaningless because it doesn't span over 12 months. But it does paint a rather different picture than the 1% figure.

If you already think it is a hoax, or wildly overblown you will always cherry pick 'data' to suit your argument, but equally if you think it is the absolute worst thing ever you could probably selectively back that up too. One of the reasons I quite like the ons reports is because they are written in a very neutral style. There was a guy from there used to pop up on the bbc who would talk though each report during the 1st lockdown who was very efficient at that too. Strangely not seen him for a while...

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Gladys said:

By the percentsge of deaths from each disease.

Surely it's more nuanced than that?

However Covid is still something of an unknown because of seasonal variation and hard to believe we have only had six full months worth of the virus. I guess we'll know the end of Feb how bad it can be.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, P.K. said:

Surely it's more nuanced than that?

However Covid is still something of an unknown because of seasonal variation and hard to believe we have only had six full months worth of the virus. I guess we'll know the end of Feb how bad it can be.

Was the COVID-19 a man made virus in China,? , and as China now says we are reducing our greenhouse gasses, is there any connection between the two, as in give the world some good news, ( and hide the bad news )  ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Roger Mexico said:

No vaccine is 100% effective - that's where herd immunity actually does come in.  If 95% of people are protected, then the other 5%  will (nearly all) be protected because there's no one to pass it on to them.  But any vaccine with a reasonable efficacy will be the easiest way of reducing the spread of the virus.

That may well have to be the case with Covid-19 because it looks increasingly if reinfections are happening quite a lot and not always with the second time being milder than the first, which I hoped would be the case.  But it may be that vaccines will work slightly differently and turn out to be longer lasting.

If there’s only been 11 reinfections from 31 million known cases I don’t think we need to be too worried. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LightBulb said:

Was the COVID-19 a man made virus in China,? , and as China now says we are reducing our greenhouse gasses, is there any connection between the two, as in give the world some good news, ( and hide the bad news )  ?

Doesn’t really matter if you believe Trump and it’s man made or most scientists who say not, it’s here to stay until vaccine available.

therefore we all have to find a way to work through it without ruining the economies forever and without massive excess deaths 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, wrighty said:

If there’s only been 11 reinfections from 31 million known cases I don’t think we need to be too worried. 

But most wouldn't be getting picked up.  The only ones that will be verified at the moment are those when it has been noticed, checked and the sequences shows that different lines were involved (so it's not just the same thing flaring up again by some mechanism).  And of course you'd expect there have to be some time between the infections, so you would only start to see them now - all those cases are in the last month.

Hopefully it won't be a big problem and the cases where it has been worse the second time around are a minority, but it's still a thing to keep an eye on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jersey still to have a single hospital admission since opening 3rd July. 111,000 tests completed.

Yes, there are compromises for what is in effect a very good system of allowing people into their Island.

We are going to need to find a compromise soon.

I‘m sure we can expect news on this tomorrow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, P.K. said:

Would you please explain what you mean?

Everyone has a direct interest in how this pandemic is handled,  be it through their health, ability to continue to earn, limitations on their freedom and so on.  It is not a spectator sport, it is something that everyone is partipating in and has implications for all.  Not a difficult concept. 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Happier diner said:

I've gotta back Banker up on this. Even though I have lived here many years I do have two daughters and a son, two step daughters, two sisters and their children. Two aunties, 1 uncle (slightly dodgy) and numerous cousins that live all over England and Wales in different parts. Not one of them has had the illness and not one of their relatives or friends have contracted it either and with only one exception, none of them know of anyone who has contracted/tested positive. 

As a comparison many people do they know who are unemployed or on furlough? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gladys said:

When it represents a greater risk to life than  most other causes of death. 

Obviously, as I am sure you will agree on reflection, it would be dense to only consider whether or not it actually kills. One would also want to take into account how unpleasant it can be even when it doesn't kill.

And how easy it is to catch, vs many other conditions some of which also kill. The impact of a thing is not only about whether it kills.

39 minutes ago, Gladys said:

Everyone has a direct interest in how this pandemic is handled,  be it through their health, ability to continue to earn, limitations on their freedom and so on.  It is not a spectator sport, it is something that everyone is partipating in and has implications for all.  Not a difficult concept. 

The "freedoms" argument is nearly always pretty bogus  IMO. And populists whining about freedoms is a pretty new thing. It's also very subjective - what we consider to be restrictions of our freedom.

The covid rules in Britain totally make sense to me. But it seems utterly daft that I am not free to grow a weed if I want to.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Happier diner said:

I've gotta back Banker up on this. Even though I have lived here many years I do have two daughters and a son, two step daughters, two sisters and their children. Two aunties, 1 uncle (slightly dodgy) and numerous cousins that live all over England and Wales in different parts. Not one of them has had the illness and not one of their relatives or friends have contracted it either and with only one exception, none of them know of anyone who has contracted/tested positive. 

From antibody studies only approx 8% of the UK have had Covid19 so it's not surprising that people don't know anyone who has had it since 92% of the UK is Covid19 free. That will change with this next wave if people don't take it seriously. Unfortunately there are a lot of vested interests pushing some very dodgy agendas to stop people taking it seriously. Have a read of this well researched piece.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...