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IOM Covid removing restrictions


Filippo

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28 minutes ago, Barlow said:

  

 

I know a computer programmer the same. One simple spelling error can screw up a program big time and cause hours/days/weeks lost time . Cobal and Fortran don't have spell checker and autocorrect.

(actually they kind of do up to a point)

That's been a crock of nonsense for a long time. Compilers will, as a rule of thumb tell you exactly where your code is going wrong if there's a spelling mistake. Modern IDEs and text editors give you a red squiggly long before that. A bit like the one you get for spelling COBOL wrong.

Edited by AcousticallyChallenged
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Just now, AcousticallyChallenged said:

That's been a crock of nonsense for a long time. Compilers will, as a rule of thumb tell you exactly where your code is going wrong. Modern IDEs and text editors give you a red squiggly long before that. A bit like the one you get for spelling COBOL wrong.

Force of habit.

It's an '80s thing, when programmers put an intentional error in their code.  Indispensability built-in.

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David Ashford on Manx Radio stating he believes  data from 7/10 or 14 day testing would be useful, but then going on to say the test is unpleasant and he doesn’t think they would get much take up.

Jesus.  Seems to be everyone apart from HQ and a few on here agree with the rest of the world and building some useful data.

Not sure the health minister should really be saying things that might put people off volunteering for a test either 

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7 minutes ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

That's been a crock of nonsense for a long time. Compilers will, as a rule of thumb tell you exactly where your code is going wrong if there's a spelling mistake. Modern IDEs and text editors give you a red squiggly long before that. A bit like the one you get for spelling COBOL wrong.

I did put a small caveat in my post. The code checkers were around long before spell-checkers.

Let's go something more basic, search on a simple database for say 'Accomodation' then the results are not going to be correctr.

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48 minutes ago, Gladys said:

Doubt they will be the ones going to Uni.

Having said that, when I was at Uni I shared a floor in halls with some fine art students who had to do 2 written assignments each year.  One was a very talented artist but not an academic.  For one assignment she plagiarised a text book on the required topic.  Unfortunately, her assignment opened with "At this juncture..."

I don't think it affected her degree results and she subsequently exhibited at the Slade.

You have to remember the huge spread in skillsets in students at Uni. Fine art is a whole different world to biology or maths, or even English literature. Degree level essay writing is a skill in itself. Ask a computer scientist to write a passionate essay and you'll get drivel. Equally, reverse that and academic writing is a difficult thing too. It's particularly dull and dry and takes a lot of practice to get right.

Unis these days are designed to carry through undergraduates as best they can at whatever point, dropouts are bad for business. It isn't some magic thing that makes you good at something. It just gives you some of the basics you might need in quite a few areas.

43 minutes ago, Barlow said:

The uni* students are as bad as any. We get them with degrees and there (sic) spelling and grammar is often primary school level.

At a push I kind of get where this modern teaching of grammar and spelling being secondary to meaning (or whatever the excuse for modern slack-arsed education is these days) but when I used to see a job application or report with shit grammar and spelling it went to the bottom of the pile. 

 

 

*Used to be called 'University'

Think of it another way. Some of the brightest people I know can't write well or spell to save their lives, but give them a knackered bit of machinery and it'll be useful again within an hour or two and some coffee.

Maybe what we're seeing is a more varied range of people who can actually read and write, just not to the same standards that people who don't struggle can.

The biggest bugbear for me is the age old: "I Type Like This Because It Adds Emphasis To Everything", but for me, that genuinely does make it harder to read. I think it's because the flow becomes more disjointed.

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Dr Allison also on MR confirming that a number of teachers have left the island and their jobs due to the inability to see family.

Granted he also said that some have relocated because of the local freedoms we have, but just an observation for those on here who didn’t seem capable of grasping what a significant issue lack of feasible travel is for some.

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10 minutes ago, Barlow said:

Force of habit.

It's an '80s thing, when programmers put an intentional error in their code.  Indispensability built-in.

The modern trick is to add a delay in, for an arbitrary number of milliseconds. When you fancy some appreciation, drop that, push a new version 'oh thank you thank you it's so much faster'

2 minutes ago, Barlow said:

I did put a small caveat in my post. The code checkers were around long before spell-checkers.

Let's go something more basic, search on a simple database for say 'Accomodation' then the results are not going to be correctr.

Well, storing the word accommodation over and over seems like poor optimization anyway. But as a general rule of thumb, databases and data-entry should be designed so you can't make those sorts of mistakes.

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1 minute ago, trmpton said:

Dr Allison also on MR confirming that a number of teachers have left the island and their jobs due to the inability to see family.

Granted he also said that some have relocated because of the local freedoms we have, but just an observation for those on here who didn’t seem capable of grasping what a significant issue lack of feasible travel is for some.

I can say from experience that I know of (and have seen) more people vacating than arriving.

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1 minute ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

The biggest bugbear for me is the age old: "I Type Like This Because It Adds Emphasis To Everything", but for me, that genuinely does make it harder to read. I think it's because the flow becomes more disjointed.

You certainly aren't alone there, but you are using hyperbole to defend slack-arsed education.

When I see a piece of writing, internet or anywhere, that doesn't capitalize the personal pronoun 'I', then I'm out. More so when towns and cities (especially in postcodes) are likewise given the same treatment. 

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1 minute ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

Well, storing the word accommodation over and over seems like poor optimization anyway. But as a general rule of thumb, databases and data-entry should be designed so you can't make those sorts of mistakes.

Yes, we used to do that with a decent education system where we were all taught to use the same spelling.

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I don't think there are many of those tbf trmpt. You explained your family position really well and most of us understand that we're not talking about hols and jolls here.

We're ultimately balancing risk against reward. The risk of unrestricted travel and the ills it may bring, against the reward of a number of individuals with family issues. At the moment we're leaning towards the many rather than the few.

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Just now, Barlow said:

Yes, we used to do that with a decent education system where we were all taught to use the same spelling.

Well, from a pure optimisation or optimization standpoint, as you fancy. Note how spellings vary across the pond too. Oh and how language is a fluid evolving thing. Look at how we once spelt words like vyolence, whiche, fayth

Little hypothetical scenario:

We're storing the category of a certain type of building, classifying accommodation, commercial, industrial. Or along those lines. 

Would it make more sense to put a text box where someone might define it as a shop? or as a drop-down selection where they can choose one of the 3 categories you're interested in?

Now. Of course, if we're looking at large scale databases, it's far better to do the latter. You'd not store the name of the type, you'd store a number or id associated with that category.

That's far less expensive from a processor perspective to compare and you don't have to worry about the length of text you're needing to store.

Spelling may be a bugbear of yours, but it doesn't stop modern systems working as a rule of thumb.

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4 hours ago, Nom de plume said:

When did the policy shift from virus mitigation to eradication as Dr. Allinson gently slipped in yesterday on the radio?

Presumably a long time ago when they discovered that virus eradication locally was possible and brought all sort of benefits, while virus mitigation has probed to be pretty much impossible everywhere (I'd be genuinely interested to know what countries/areas people think have been able achieve a constant low level of in-community cases).  Instead countries have needed to  impose strong lockdown measures that suppress infection almost entirely (as we saw in the UK) which then have to be repeated all over again.

I know I keep saying this, but you can't have a little bit of an epidemic anymore than you can be a little bit pregnant.  

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Watched a Sky News interview last night, a Professor Christina Sagel who is a member of the UK Gov's SAGE committee.

She proceeded to absolutely slate UK Gov's response to the virus (the interview was precipitated by the news that UK COVID deaths had exceeded 50k and drew comparisons with April statements hoping for @ 20k), by stating that the first and now the second lockdowns were respectively implemented far too late and that scientific advice had been ignored. It also cast doubt on what will happen at the conclusion of the second lockdown.

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44 minutes ago, trmpton said:

David Ashford on Manx Radio stating he believes  data from 7/10 or 14 day testing would be useful, but then going on to say the test is unpleasant and he doesn’t think they would get much take up.

Jesus.  Seems to be everyone apart from HQ and a few on here agree with the rest of the world and building some useful data.

Not sure the health minister should really be saying things that might put people off volunteering for a test either 

Yes it’s unpleasant but only takes 20/30 seconds for both swabs, I had the 7 days one before Howie scrapped.

there has to be an incentive to have it and the 7 days outside for walks etc was it and many took the test as the numbers show. They could amend the 7 days testing rules to say you can’t go inside anywhere including essential shops to ease the complaints 

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