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IOM Covid removing restrictions


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Can you guys start a separate thread titled "Jersey is ace - oh no it isn't" and leave this one to a discussion on IOM and the coronavirus?

It's a safe place right now because of the Manx people, not the Manx politicians. None of us want to be "the person who brought it back" so we isolate and make sure we don't transmit the virus by bein

Ratio of admissions to deaths is not that different, testing is obviously out due to the massive capacity increase like just about everywhere in the world.    The current UK situation is impact

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20 minutes ago, manxman34 said:

Looks like they're saying the CEO lied when giving evidence to the Tynwald committee - what would be the outcome if that were the case, I wonder

I think everyone including teachers accepts the unions have been dragging their heels on any suggestions to help educate children , too busy trying to get more money out of Government, should have settled claims when the government was flush with cash.

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Or... they suspended all industrial action because of the CV19 crisis. Which is their main gripe with Barr.

Barr says they were kicking off, unions say they suspended all industrial action.


Even if they didn't suspend action they were working to rule. Which, last time I checked, is doing precisely what their job asks of them.

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1 hour ago, Golfer said:

I think everyone including teachers accepts the unions have been dragging their heels on any suggestions to help educate children , too busy trying to get more money out of Government, should have settled claims when the government was flush with cash.

There was 80% + support from teachers for the unions here when they started 'action short of strike action'. There is a kind of 'work to rule' in place, but unions are saying it didn't impact on home learning: Barr says it did, so someone is lying. Time will tell, I suppose.

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6 minutes ago, manxman34 said:

There was 80% + support from teachers for the unions here when they started 'action short of strike action'. There is a kind of 'work to rule' in place, but unions are saying it didn't impact on home learning: Barr says it did, so someone is lying. Time will tell, I suppose.

Home learning was non existent in lots of schools, there were a few good exceptions but mostly there was very little, ask the parents. A number of teachers did very little except painting house or gardening etc

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1 hour ago, DrunkenMonkey said:

Or... they suspended all industrial action because of the CV19 crisis. Which is their main gripe with Barr.

Barr says they were kicking off, unions say they suspended all industrial action.


Even if they didn't suspend action they were working to rule. Which, last time I checked, is doing precisely what their job asks of them.

They suspended industrial action largely because going on strike in the last 3 months would be like going on strike in August.  Utterly pointless.

The unions did nothing to help really.  It's all bluster.

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3 minutes ago, Golfer said:

Home learning was non existent in lots of schools, there were a few good exceptions but mostly there was very little, ask the parents. A number of teachers did very little except painting house or gardening etc

Do you have any proof of this other than anecdotal evidence?

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1 minute ago, DrunkenMonkey said:

Do you have any proof of this other than anecdotal evidence?

I second it. Anecdotal as well I know, but not a dicky bird of any learning given from school to my kids.

If the teachers or government really gave the smallest of fucks about the children or their parents they would cancel the summer holidays. How will any parent will manage to take yet more time off a few short weeks after going back to work??

The kids could make the learning theyve missed up if the holidays were cancelled.

But we all know the teachers would never agree 

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1 minute ago, Butterflies said:

 

I second it. Anecdotal as well I know, but not a dicky bird of any learning given from school to my kids.

If the teachers or government really gave the smallest of fucks about the children or their parents they would cancel the summer holidays. How will any parent will manage to take yet more time off a few short weeks after going back to work??

The kids could make the learning theyve missed up if the holidays were cancelled.

But we all know the teachers would never agree 

Would you as a tax payer be willing to pay for the additional six weeks the teachers would be working?

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12 minutes ago, DrunkenMonkey said:

Do you have any proof of this other than anecdotal evidence?

How much proof do you want.?
I, as an old codger with younger family members, can tell you that some teachers were fantastic and provided lots of material for there charges to use, including quizzes to keep it jovial.

On the other hand , some teachers did next to nothing and had a nice long break.

Butterflies has a very valid point. These children won’t get a second chance and have lost a lot of learning time that they can’t get back.

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1 minute ago, Scotty said:

These children won’t get a second chance and have lost a lot of learning time that they can’t get back.

When people say kids are going to be ‘behind’ I say, behind what?? Not each other - they’re all in the same boat. Only ‘behind’ the age expectations of a curriculum that currently has limited context due to these extraordinary circumstances. In front on so many other more important fronts I say.

What if instead of “behind” this group of kids are advanced because of this.

What if they have more empathy, they enjoy family connection, they can be more creative and entertain themselves, they love to read, they love to express themselves in writing.

What if they enjoy the simple things, like their own backyard and sitting near a window in the quiet?

What if they notice the birds and the dates the different flowers emerge, and the calming renewal of a gentle rain shower?

What if this generation is the one to learn to cook, organize their space, do their laundry, and keep a well-run home?

What if they learn to stretch a fiver and to live with less?

What if they learn to plan shopping trips and meals at home?

What if they learn the value of eating together as a family and finding the good to share in the small delights of the everyday?

What if they are the ones to place great value on our teachers and educational professionals, librarians, public servants and the previously invisible essential support workers like lorry drivers, supermarket workers, cashiers, custodians, logistics, and health care workers and their supporting staff, just to name a few of the millions taking care of us right now while we are sheltered in place?

What if among these children, a great leader emerges who had the benefit of a slower pace and a simpler life, who has a fine sense of empathy and care and concern for fellow humans.

What if he or she truly learns what really matters in all this…

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Yup, good post. Sure, a bit more structural guidance from the school would have been handy, but with the weather being so great me and the nipper have had a super time. We mostly focused on the natural world around us so his awareness of springtime and all that goes on in out there has been enhanced for sure, seen things hatching, plant and trees bursting into life and stuff, and we've done a couple of other little practical projects. Not really done what anyone would call proper home schooling but we've done a lot of geography, maps and flags, some stuff around the virus, other illness and medicine, and some aspects of history. Ran out of books though. Its time that I wouldn't normally have had with him. Its been pretty nice really, although I haven't managed to get him to do the washing up. 

Time to go back though. Be interesting to see how quickly the idea of a routine comes back.

I can't help thinking that some of the whinging about the schools has simply been that people can't be arsed dealing with their own offspring.

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The whole "he said she said" thing with the unions is embarrassing. They sound like they're the pupils not the teachers.

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1 hour ago, Golfer said:

Home learning was non existent in lots of schools, there were a few good exceptions but mostly there was very little, ask the parents. A number of teachers did very little except painting house or gardening etc

Yep, same with my kid. No teaching online, no interest, nothing. 

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2 hours ago, manxman34 said:

Looks like they're saying the CEO lied when giving evidence to the Tynwald committee - what would be the outcome if that were the case, I wonder

Nothing.. lessons will be learned

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