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23 minutes ago, Max Power said:

Results of the Island Global Research equality survey. You need to download the document. 

https://www.islandglobalresearch.com/news

No real surprises I don't think?

The trouble with surveys is that they are only representative of people who participate in them. I certainly CBA filling out any forms or whatever. But the people who are bothered will.

Incidentally, the thing that kicked off the @Stu Peters thing on the Isle of Man, was him making a post that the BLM marches were sparked off by an incident that happened in USA, thousands of miles away and he was questioning what relevance it had here. It was a reasonable question to ask.

I see in a response to a Manx Radio interview about young people spitting at police, a reference was made to a change of attitudes towards the police as a result of what happened in America. :.."policing in America and policing in the Isle of Man is two completely different things, completely different society and the way that we police..."

The police on the Isle of Man are getting a hard time on the back of something that happened in USA. Maybe, in line with the IoM's strict policy on Covid-19 the march should have been stopped here, but I suppose it is a case of damned if you do and damned if you don't.

 

 

 

Edited by Barlow
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1 hour ago, Max Power said:

Results of the Island Global Research equality survey. You need to download the document. 

https://www.islandglobalresearch.com/news

No real surprises I don't think? 9% identified as BAME, 88% as white, 2% didn't know. It seems more white people see a problem and support BLM, is this white guilt? 

I think they did a really weird job of communicating the report, so much so that they accidentally buried the most surprising and interesting result: that self-identified Black, Asian, etc., respondents on the Isle of Man broadly identified racism as less of a problem than the white respondents did.

82% of all respondents thought that "a little, some, or a great deal of racism exists" on IOM. Only 60% of "Black, Asian, etc." did.

32% of all respondents thought "our island has already made the changes to give all racial and ethnic groups equal rights" but 50% of Black, Asian, etc., respondents thought that.

 

(For what it's worth, this data is perfectly in line with my anecdotal experience - various local/Manx/white people telling me that the island is terribly racist, and me & migrant friends strongly disagreeing and thinking that the IOM is an incredibly welcoming and loving place to people.)

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2 minutes ago, Josem said:

I think they did a really weird job of communicating the report, so much so that they accidentally buried the most surprising and interesting result: that self-identified Black, Asian, etc., respondents on the Isle of Man broadly identified racism as less of a problem than the white respondents did.

82% of all respondents thought that "a little, some, or a great deal of racism exists" on IOM. Only 60% of "Black, Asian, etc." did.

32% of all respondents thought "our island has already made the changes to give all racial and ethnic groups equal rights" but 50% of Black, Asian, etc., respondents thought that.

 

(For what it's worth, this data is perfectly in line with my anecdotal experience - various local/Manx/white people telling me that the island is terribly racist, and me & migrant friends strongly disagreeing and thinking that the IOM is an incredibly welcoming and loving place to people.)

And that is exactly my experience too! There will always be one or two idiots about but there are laws to deal with them.

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12 minutes ago, Josem said:

what it's worth, this data is perfectly in line with my anecdotal experience - various local/Manx/white people telling me that the island is terribly racist, and me & migrant friends strongly disagreeing and thinking that the IOM is an incredibly welcoming and loving place to people.)

But that's not what the data says? It says 60% of non-caucasian respondents said there's racism. I'd hardly call it buried either, it's one of the very first large statistics in the document!

Interesting that we had so many responses compared to Jersey.

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49 minutes ago, Josem said:

I think they did a really weird job of communicating the report, so much so that they accidentally buried the most surprising and interesting result: that self-identified Black, Asian, etc., respondents on the Isle of Man broadly identified racism as less of a problem than the white respondents did.

82% of all respondents thought that "a little, some, or a great deal of racism exists" on IOM. Only 60% of "Black, Asian, etc." did.

32% of all respondents thought "our island has already made the changes to give all racial and ethnic groups equal rights" but 50% of Black, Asian, etc., respondents thought that.

 

(For what it's worth, this data is perfectly in line with my anecdotal experience - various local/Manx/white people telling me that the island is terribly racist, and me & migrant friends strongly disagreeing and thinking that the IOM is an incredibly welcoming and loving place to people.)

I really don't think that a Australian should comment about racial harmony.

 

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54 minutes ago, Holte End said:

I really don't think that a Australian should comment about racial harmony.

Hell of a post to make there, buddy: using someone's national background to try exclude them from a conversation about racism. The irony has been laid on thick!

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Regarding the report , I have some coloured friends whom I asked if they were going on the March and they said no way they saw it as diversive and believed that the people who were marching had no idea what BLM stood for.   I watched footage of the said march and observed that the marchers were 99% white and looked like students there were a few oldies there and a few dogs :whistling:but not many coloured people which in my book says it all.   The march should never have taken place whilst Covid restrictions were in place but of course they needed to hold it while the students were still on the Island.   

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8 minutes ago, TheTeapot said:

This is a common theme with Josem.

Not mention the spectacular pivot from ...

2 hours ago, Josem said:

(For what it's worth, this data is perfectly in line with my anecdotal experience - various local/Manx/white people telling me that the island is terribly racist, and me & migrant friends strongly disagreeing and thinking that the IOM is an incredibly welcoming and loving place to people.)

to

17 minutes ago, Josem said:

Hell of a post to make there, buddy: using someone's national background to try exclude them from a conversation about racism. The irony has been laid on thick!

 

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2 hours ago, Josem said:

I think they did a really weird job of communicating the report, so much so that they accidentally buried the most surprising and interesting result: that self-identified Black, Asian, etc., respondents on the Isle of Man broadly identified racism as less of a problem than the white respondents did.

This misses a couple of important points about the survey.  The first is that, as Island Global Research themselves report, the sample for BAME respondents is small, consisting of just 87 people.  That means that, were this a random sample (which it isn't), there would be some pretty hefty confidence intervals around that figure. The second is that BAME typically excludes anyone who is white, but plenty of white people in the British Isles can consider themselves to be victims of racism, i.e. Eastern Europeans, Irish Travellers, etc. A further point is that there's no useful breakdown of how the two groups answered: it may be the case that a majority of the BAME respondents who reported a perception of racism did so for the two higher categories, while white respondents by and large reported lower categories, in which case the analysis would have to be a lot more nuanced than "Look!  White people think it's a bigger problem than Black, Asian, etc., respondents do!"

That alone should act as a caution against leaping to (or insinuating) a particular conclusion about racism on the Island and how it is perceived.

 Then there's the fact that accurately investigating the actual prevalence and degree of racism and racist attitudes in a society is notoriously difficult and probably requires much more subtle and sophisticated techniques than Island Global Research were able to employ (which, to be fair, they more or less admit in the introduction).

2 hours ago, Josem said:

I think they did a really weird job of communicating the report, so much so that they accidentally buried the most surprising and interesting result

It's not really buried though. The result is right there on the page dealing with the Isle of Man, clear enough to see for anyone capable of adding three numbers together.

image.png.8f139505de220725fde22bfcc46547d6.png

It's not like they consigned the figure to a passing mention within a dense wall of text in section 5.6 of Appendix F.

Edited by VinnieK
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59 minutes ago, hissingsid said:

Regarding the report , I have some coloured friends whom I asked if they were going on the March and they said no way they saw it as diversive and believed that the people who were marching had no idea what BLM stood for.   I watched footage of the said march and observed that the marchers were 99% white and looked like students there were a few oldies there and a few dogs :whistling:but not many coloured people which in my book says it all.   The march should never have taken place whilst Covid restrictions were in place but of course they needed to hold it while the students were still on the Island.   

I thought you were not allowed to say ‘coloured’ any more. I could be wrong though as you can say ‘people of colour’ . Maybe there is a difference. 

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10 minutes ago, Anyone said:

I thought you were not allowed to say ‘coloured’ any more. I could be wrong though as you can say ‘people of colour’ . Maybe there is a difference. 

I'm not sure anymore either. I had never heard the term people of colour until recently. I think I kind of sort of know now, but I'm not sure. 

Didn't the Manx Radio presenter get hauled over the coals for allowing a caller to use the word 'coloured' , even though it was clear they did not mean it in any pejorative way and were just uneducated as I am/was by the screaming wokedom the world has become.

 

1 hour ago, HeliX said:

They weren't though. The majority were white, yes, but so is the majority of the island's population so that's not exactly surprising.

And the majority were female. I think I know why but I'm not sure what law I would be accused of breaking if I said.

 

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21 minutes ago, Anyone said:

I thought you were not allowed to say ‘coloured’ any more. I could be wrong though as you can say ‘people of colour’ . Maybe there is a difference. 

Historical connotations + "people-first language". Similar to how "autist" is unkind, but "person with autism" isn't.

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