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Black Lives Matter


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I expect the protest will be in front of the U.S. Embassy in Douglas - otherwise an IOM protest about police brutality in Murrica makes no sense except as a virtue signalling snowstorm. In other

No, it’s acquired, through exposure to bigotry. In fact from bigots like you.

Nice post Max. I was asked in either this thread or another,  whether I was frightened by change.  I replied setting out the changes that you and I have seen over our lives.  Far more fundamental

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1 minute ago, Neil Down said:

If you are bright enough, you can contextualise anywhere...

OK I'll accept that, but it's harder to do in a town square where people are just passing through. "Ahh he must have been a great man there's a statue to him in the town centre". Than in a museum which people go to for thoughtful contemplation.

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2 minutes ago, Chef Raekwon said:

Says the man who doesn't understand the difference in context between a statue in a museum and a statue on the street 

Don't be an idiot all the time son, take a day off

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2 minutes ago, Declan said:

OK I'll accept that, but it's harder to do in a town square where people are just passing through. "Ahh he must have been a great man there's a statue to him in the town centre". Than in a museum which people go to for thoughtful contemplation.

Six of one half a dozen of the other. I have friends in the UK who love wandering the different towns looking at various statures/architecture but normally would not go into a museum for some strange reason. In other cases, seeing the statue in the street encourages them to do just that. For some strange reason, "live and let live" has been replaced with "we are in the minority so do as we demand"

Crazy, crazy world

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7 minutes ago, quilp said:

The obvious solution is to build a Museum of Hate and Hypocrisy. Put all the offending symbolism in one place so SJW's can salivate over their success. 

I'll be honest, I'd go to that museum.

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Pulling down statues (or any other action) by mob rule rather than democratic agreement is very dangerous and never leads anywhere good. I also think historical characters should be judged on the moral standards of their time period rather than those of today otherwise you could probably justify pulling every statue down.

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4 minutes ago, TheTeapot said:

Thanks. If I was 20 years older and 3 stone heavier I'd probably look like most of the other exhibits.

You mean you don't now... 

 

if not, you haven't been taking this lockdown seriously enough... :P

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6 minutes ago, Neil Down said:

Six of one half a dozen of the other. I have friends in the UK who love wandering the different towns looking at various statures/architecture but normally would not go into a museum for some strange reason. In other cases, seeing the statue in the street encourages them to do just that. For some strange reason, "live and let live" has been replaced with "we are in the minority so do as we demand"

Crazy, crazy world

Totally agree. Familiar statues and street landmarks give familiarity and a sense of place to people. I don't believe for one minute that people going about their daily lives are either idolising, celebrating or for that matter damning figures from history. It's just a militant front driving such acts of destruction.

Reading Neil's post, I was reminded of an account written by the daughter of a man working for the Colonial Office out of Khartoum, Sudan in the 1950s during her childhood. As they walked around the city when she was very young, her father had pointed out the landmarks including the statue of General Gordon of Khartoum mounted on a camel. The edifice was known by all and sundry simply as "Gordon" and the little girl greeted it with a "Good Morning, Gordon" each day as she passed by. At the the end of his posting, she was sad to be leaving, and insisted that she wanted to say goodbye to Gordon one last time, so the man walked with her to the statue. When she had said her tearful farewell, she asked her father, "Daddy. Who is the man sitting on Gordon's back?"

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Considering the current historical furore, leaving the 'offending' relics in place surely makes more sense. The presence of such artifacts are a necessary reminder of past folly, a talking point and a precursor of discussion about the circumstances of why they ended up in place and why they should or shouldn't be celebrated.

I see a statue of Christopher Columbus has been torn down somewhere in Yankland, draped in a burning Stars and Stripes and a 'far-right' group in Britain declaring they'll protect some statues from the mob.

I predict a riot (or two). 

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8 minutes ago, quilp said:

Considering the current historical furore, leaving the 'offending' relics in place surely makes more sense. The presence of such artifacts are a necessary reminder of past folly, a talking point and a precursor of discussion about the circumstances of why they ended up in place and why they should or shouldn't be celebrated.

I see a statue of Christopher Columbus has been torn down somewhere in Yankland, draped in a burning Stars and Stripes and a 'far-right' group in Britain declaring they'll protect some statues from the mob.

I predict a riot (or two). 

Didn't life seem simple when the Berlin Wall came down?

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These protesters on the Island who are now so smug regarding their peaceful march of 700 plus or 1500 depending on who you believe, did they include the dogs, may just reflect they were marching under the same banner as the rioters who attacked police and damaged property in the UK.

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5 minutes ago, woolley said:

Didn't life seem simple when the Berlin Wall came down?

Exactly, and parts of it still remain, as a necessary reminder. Many Germans have a remnant of commie concrete sitting proudly on their anrichte's as a souvenir. 

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11 minutes ago, quilp said:

Exactly, and parts of it still remain, as a necessary reminder. Many Germans have a remnant of commie concrete sitting proudly on their anrichte's as a souvenir. 

A lot of them wish they'd put the wall back up!

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