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There are so many petitions going at the minute I wonder if anyone can remember if any had been successful in the past.   Do you have to have a certain amount of signatures and then a MHK picks it up and it goes before Tynwald or am I getting mixed up with the Tynwald Day petitions?   Asking for a friend !!

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You're getting mixed up.

The petition for redress of grievance on Tynwald Day is the one which needs an MHK to pick up.

Collecting signatures for a populist cause is a different think altogether, although arguably, they're both akin to pissing into the wind.

Edited by piebaps
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I've got one running to hopefully persuade the Government to independently regulate Manx Gas and eventually all utilities. Chris Thomas MHK has promised he will refer to it at July Tynwald. 

I think many petitions are started, but in many case their purpose is not fully utilised. A petition in itself is not enough to win a campaign. That takes stamina. 

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Petitions are a complete waste of time. It's not how the Manx Government works. Outside of the five yearly elections/ bye elections, there is no link between the public and the elected assembly. Tynwald doesn't really control much either; most policy and decisions are in the hands of senior civil/public servants, so the public are well distanced from any influence or input.  

ETA: I've spoken to a few ex-members of the Keys. They'll tell you that they don't even know what's going on, nevermind have any power or influence. Just there to make up the numbers.

Edited by Shake me up Judy
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1 hour ago, Shake me up Judy said:

Petitions are a complete waste of time. It's not how the Manx Government works. Outside of the five yearly elections/ bye elections, there is no link between the public and the elected assembly. Tynwald doesn't really control much either; most policy and decisions are in the hands of senior civil/public servants, so the public are well distanced from any influence or input.  

ETA: I've spoken to a few ex-members of the Keys. They'll tell you that they don't even know what's going on, nevermind have any power or influence. Just there to make up the numbers.

I would agree with this. I pointed out a particular issue to do with the Prom debacable to a couple of members directoy and indireactly involved in DOI and neither knew about these before I brought them up. Despite they being on the My Prom website . Both asked could I forward the link to them. Just incredible really . 

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I organised a petition a few years ago which obtained 10,000 signatures. The principle of petitions in general was dismissed by the government minister concerned until he realised how many had signed it and the strength of feeling behind it. He headed it off before I could make an issue of presenting it by conceding to the main points contained in the document. I still have it gathering dust at home. 

To be fair, if he hadn't conceded there were people in the group who would have taken more drastic action! I think he got the message.

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I think petitions are most useful when there's already political will to do what the petition asks for. It moves it up the agenda, nudges blockers out the way - "look we've massive public support".

Otherwise it's rare that a single petition, demo or march will ever achieve a stated goal. Signing a petition about Aparthied - as many of us did - didn't end it. But all the petitions, demos, marches, boycotts, sanctions, and songs played apart in ending it.

There seems this idea the government will act as soon as a petition triggers a certain number. Nah, that didn't happen when petitions were gathered on paper on  drizzly Saturdays in hundreds of Northern Shopping Centres it's not going to happen now its one step up from liking a post on here. But if you agree with a cause it's better to sign than not it gives a tiny bit more ammo to the campaigners.

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1 hour ago, Max Power said:

I organised a petition a few years ago which obtained 10,000 signatures. The principle of petitions in general was dismissed by the government minister concerned until he realised how many had signed it and the strength of feeling behind it. He headed it off before I could make an issue of presenting it by conceding to the main points contained in the document. I still have it gathering dust at home. 

To be fair, if he hadn't conceded there were people in the group who would have taken more drastic action! I think he got the message.

Go on then Max, tell us what it was about.

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2 minutes ago, Declan said:

... if you agree with a cause it's better to sign than not it gives a tiny bit more ammo to the campaigners.

Then being given the bullet by the government. 

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They sometimes can have an immediate effect - you only have to look at the comical handbrake turn they ended up doing over the cancelled Bank Holiday. 

And for other topics they may act as much as a consciousness-raising activity and a focus for campaigning as anything else.  But if people just put one up on one of the petition sites and magically expect something to then happen without doing anything, then they're going to be disappointed. 

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6 hours ago, Declan said:

I think petitions are most useful when there's already political will to do what the petition asks for. It moves it up the agenda, nudges blockers out the way - "look we've massive public support".

Otherwise it's rare that a single petition, demo or march will ever achieve a stated goal. Signing a petition about Aparthied - as many of us did - didn't end it. But all the petitions, demos, marches, boycotts, sanctions, and songs played apart in ending it.

There seems this idea the government will act as soon as a petition triggers a certain number. Nah, that didn't happen when petitions were gathered on paper on  drizzly Saturdays in hundreds of Northern Shopping Centres it's not going to happen now its one step up from liking a post on here. But if you agree with a cause it's better to sign than not it gives a tiny bit more ammo to the campaigners.

They did react to the organised Manx Gas protests though, albeit slowly. Possibly the sight of protesters actually on the street outside Tynwald had one or two a bit worried?

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16 hours ago, dilligaf said:

Go on then Max, tell us what it was about.

The MGP muddle. More a misunderstanding of what was going on I think.

Edited by Max Power
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