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Teacher’s pay dispute


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1 minute ago, The Duck of Atholl said:

Teaching is a tough gig. I challenge any detractor to throw in what they are doing, qualify and teach for a couple of years and not agree.

You would know why ?

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I was just getting catches of this debate this morning on MR so have I got it right.....there are currently 800+ teachers on the Island, 200+ do not belong to any union that leaves just over 600 who do , out of this 57% went to meeting to vote on possible strike action so numbers now down to 300+ who voted.   The most interesting comment was sent in by a teacher who said he was tired of the situation and just wanted to get on with his job and wished the public would not judge all teachers who were being lead by union action.   Now apologies if I am not absolutely spot on with this info but this is what I gathered.   Was anyone else listening and could agree or disagree with my interpretation of the current situation.

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24 minutes ago, hissingsid said:

I was just getting catches of this debate this morning on MR so have I got it right.....there are currently 800+ teachers on the Island, 200+ do not belong to any union that leaves just over 600 who do , out of this 57% went to meeting to vote on possible strike action so numbers now down to 300+ who voted.   The most interesting comment was sent in by a teacher who said he was tired of the situation and just wanted to get on with his job and wished the public would not judge all teachers who were being lead by union action.   Now apologies if I am not absolutely spot on with this info but this is what I gathered.   Was anyone else listening and could agree or disagree with my interpretation of the current situation.

Correct a minority of teachers voted for strike action so it’s been driven by the militants.

allison needs to make clear that those who take action won’t be paid anything 

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Not driven by militants, just a group of people who have had everything handed to them on a plate because Mummy and Daddy didn’t know how to say no.

The unions are just tagging along with it to get their faces in the press and to try to justify their union fees. Union still get their money and long lunches even when the people paying for it don’t.

Most of them have spent no time out of an educational environment, left school, went to uni to study History and Theory of Art, Bar flies or sociology, then off to teacher training, then back to school.  No idea or experience of the real world.  
 

Most I know are clueless airheads just in it for the the TLR points.  

The decent ones got fed up with the ‘Mummy paid for this and Daddy bought me that’ type and left 10+ years ago.

Meanwhile, Heads fall for the ‘I need experience in this and that to further my career’ and make up jobs spreading extra points like it’s confetti.  They then sod off back to Ireland or the UK at the 1st chance of getting a department head job or Senior Leadership post, at our expense.

 

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The militant woman stood for Douglas East in 2011*. I spoke to her after the count and she seemed to be somewhat bitter at the result, and she said that people had promised to vote for her who must not have.

Hmmm. 

She was clearly looking for power and has now found some. I feel her stance and attitude, certainly at this time, is out of hilter with the general feeling of the populace, government, and, it seems a large proportion of teachers.

She is not doing our society any good at the moment. Not only is her attitude wrong the timing is just bizarre**. Aye, that's militants for you.

 

*of which a prolific poster on this forum also stood and will likely agree with what I am saying

**the timing is actually obscene. Further, remember whatever we all may say and think, the Government at this time is riding higher than it has for many years.

Edited by gettafa
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Many teachers will be quite happy to carry on with ‘action short of strike’ for months and months to come. No meetings to go to.  No classroom observation or performance management. No lunchtime activities to run with students. For most this in itself will represent a significant improvement in working conditions 

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59 minutes ago, x-in-man said:

Most of them have spent no time out of an educational environment, left school, went to uni to study History and Theory of Art, Bar flies or sociology, then off to teacher training, then back to school.  No idea or experience of the real world.  

My experience entirely. I trained as a teacher, partly because there were teachers in the family, partly because I couldn't think of anything else I wanted to do, and, I suppose, there was the lure of those nice long holidays.

What spoiled it for me was that during school, then college, holidays, I had worked at a number of different jobs - shop, packing factory, postal delivery, etc., etc., and I got a bit of "real life experience". I then went into teaching practice, and found that in the staff room, all the teachers could find to chat about was who was the head teacher's pet, which teacher had more supplies of pencils/paper than the others, and exceptionally, what had happened on last night's soap on TV. There was no talk about anything that was "real life".

There was still the syndrome that put a dyslexic (but very intelligent) kid at the back of the class to be ignored, because they were going to need too much work.

I hated it,  did not pursue teaching as a career, and got an office job. This was a very long number of years ago. Is the profession any better now???

The union lady spoke of the amount of work that the teachers did during lockdown, helping with home schooling projects etc... I have no doubt that a good number of them did sterling work, and have nothing but praise for those who did.... but.... how many of the 800 or so did take advantage of the situation and lie out in their gardens sunbathing,  enjoying the easy life, and getting paid for their inactivity?  Or am I just being cynical?

Edited by monasqueen
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2 hours ago, hissingsid said:

I was just getting catches of this debate this morning on MR so have I got it right.....there are currently 800+ teachers on the Island, 200+ do not belong to any union that leaves just over 600 who do , out of this 57% went to meeting to vote on possible strike action so numbers now down to 300+ who voted.   The most interesting comment was sent in by a teacher who said he was tired of the situation and just wanted to get on with his job and wished the public would not judge all teachers who were being lead by union action.   Now apologies if I am not absolutely spot on with this info but this is what I gathered.   Was anyone else listening and could agree or disagree with my interpretation of the current situation.

So far as I know it's only NASUWT who have been balloted, 85% voted in favour of a walkout, 94% voted in favour of action short of strike.

To imply that people who were not balloted (the other unions) are not in favour of strike is erroneous. We simply don't know.

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14 minutes ago, monasqueen said:

This was a very long number of years ago. Is the profession any better now???

Was this in the 70s-90s sort of range by any chance? I know people who taught both in the UK and here in the 50s and 60s who enjoyed it, and people who have taught the last 10 years and enjoyed it. I don't know anyone who taught in the 70s-90s or even up to 00s who enjoyed it. Not sure what changed and when, not something I've particularly taken interest in discovering.

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16 minutes ago, HeliX said:

So far as I know it's only NASUWT who have been balloted, 85% voted in favour of a walkout, 94% voted in favour of action short of strike.

To imply that people who were not balloted (the other unions) are not in favour of strike is erroneous. We simply don't know.

How do those % work then ? If 94% voted for action short of a strike, how did 85% vote to strike? 
Is it just me being stupid ? 
Is a walkout not a strike ?

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