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Conversion of Slides


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I have a large collection of photographic slides which I would like to review and then digitise some to share with family.  They are from the 50s, 60s and 70s and are mostly in cases so should be relatively undamaged.

There are scanners available for around £150 - £200 which seem OK, but I would appreciate any advice.  I could have them professionally scanned, but I would have to review them first as quite a few will be of scenes rather than people, which is what I want to preserve.  I do have a battery operated viewer which works, but the picture size makes it hard to identify what is in the picture.  So it struck me that it may be better to buy a scanner and scan while reviewing. 

I also have some old cine film which would be better done professionally.  But, again, advice welcomed.

Lastly, does anyone have any idea what I should do with the scenes, many of which will be from Ireland, which I will not be able to identify.  If there are any IOM scenes I will offer them to the Museum in case there is any archive value but, again, any advice would be appreciated. 

 

 

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Years ago I used a reflector device to scan 35mm slides on a regular flatbed scanner. It wasn’t mine, I’ve no idea where to get one or even if they still exist. 
 

Clearly an entry for ‘most helpful post of the year’ 

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21 minutes ago, Gladys said:

I have a large collection of photographic slides which I would like to review and then digitise some to share with family.  They are from the 50s, 60s and 70s and are mostly in cases so should be relatively undamaged.

There are scanners available for around £150 - £200 which seem OK, but I would appreciate any advice.  I could have them professionally scanned, but I would have to review them first as quite a few will be of scenes rather than people, which is what I want to preserve.  I do have a battery operated viewer which works, but the picture size makes it hard to identify what is in the picture.  So it struck me that it may be better to buy a scanner and scan while reviewing. 

I also have some old cine film which would be better done professionally.  But, again, advice welcomed.

Lastly, does anyone have any idea what I should do with the scenes, many of which will be from Ireland, which I will not be able to identify.  If there are any IOM scenes I will offer them to the Museum in case there is any archive value but, again, any advice would be appreciated. 

 

 

Bought one from Amazon a couple of years ago for under £50. Works brilliantly

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Part of my job, in the days of film services was to convert slides to copy negative and thus print. For the process in those days I used a Canon AE camera on a tripod with a fixed 100mm lens and a 1:1 converter fitted, set on aperture priority and obviously manual focus, using 100ASA, 35mm standard Fujifilm and cord shutter-release to eliminate shake. The slides were placed on masked-off (daylight) light box and the mask cut to the size of the slide. With the 1:1 converter it was possible to fill the viewfinder full-frame and set on aperture-priority it gave an appropriate exposure time, usually 1 or 2 seconds depending on the exposure and quality of the original image. The results were excellent, sharp, with good contrast, even when blown up to poster size and the service provided a very substantial mark-up.

Just wanted to reminisce, really, retirement can be a bore occasionally.<_<

Must invest in new camera :rolleyes:

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43 minutes ago, quilp said:

Part of my job, in the days of film services was to convert slides to copy negative and thus print. For the process in those days I used a Canon AE camera on a tripod with a fixed 100mm lens and a 1:1 converter fitted, set on aperture priority and obviously manual focus, using 100ASA, 35mm standard Fujifilm and cord shutter-release to eliminate shake. The slides were placed on masked-off (daylight) light box and the mask cut to the size of the slide. With the 1:1 converter it was possible to fill the viewfinder full-frame and set on aperture-priority it gave an appropriate exposure time, usually 1 or 2 seconds depending on the exposure and quality of the original image. The results were excellent, sharp, with good contrast, even when blown up to poster size and the service provided a very substantial mark-up.

Just wanted to reminisce, really, retirement can be a bore occasionally.<_<

Must invest in new camera :rolleyes:

There you go Gladys, all you need is a few thousand quid for the equipment... :lol:

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58 minutes ago, quilp said:

Part of my job, in the days of film services was to convert slides to copy negative and thus print. For the process in those days I used a Canon AE camera on a tripod with a fixed 100mm lens and a 1:1 converter fitted, set on aperture priority and obviously manual focus, using 100ASA, 35mm standard Fujifilm and cord shutter-release to eliminate shake. The slides were placed on masked-off (daylight) light box and the mask cut to the size of the slide. With the 1:1 converter it was possible to fill the viewfinder full-frame and set on aperture-priority it gave an appropriate exposure time, usually 1 or 2 seconds depending on the exposure and quality of the original image. The results were excellent, sharp, with good contrast, even when blown up to poster size and the service provided a very substantial mark-up.

Just wanted to reminisce, really, retirement can be a bore occasionally.<_<

Must invest in new camera :rolleyes:

Thanks Quilp, that could have been helpful. ;)

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12 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

I've used a couple that have worked quite well. Last one was one that scans directly to an SD card and has a built in display. There are much newer versions available for around 100 quid. It's a Veho smart fix.

 

 

That is what I am looking at on Amazon.  There will probably be something like 400 slides once I have reviewed them all, so definitely worth buying the kit. Thanks. 

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Hi I have had some cine films put on to usb by a company called digital converters , have had good service from them . the turn round is about 3 weeks and the prices seem reasonable. the web site makes it easy to calculate the cost 

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