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I do hope these protesters all walked or cycled to the gathering...and home again of course.

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Should they? I'd say they have the right, in a free a democratic society, to be 'more concerned' about whatever they choose.

Not climate campaigners in reality. There is no "climate emergency" that needs addressing on this island (or anywhere else for that matter). These kids are using the climate as a flag of convenience.

They could very easily stick some bloody wind turbines in the sea. Just look east, there are thousands of them, we don't have any and its always windy. Its bonkers that we have none.

9 minutes ago, Uhtred said:

I do hope these protesters all walked or cycled to the gathering...and home again of course.

Yeah right...

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2 hours ago, pongo said:

 

 

In Britain (where everyone on the IOM lives) 25% of electricity is already produced from renewable sources. And that number is rapidly increasing - whilst the cost in real terms is continually decreasing. It's a success story from any perspective.

And in the IoM (where everyone on the IoM also lives) the figure is considerably less than 5%, despite us having many natural resources ideal for the production of renewable energy.  This figure is wholly within the control of the Manx government,  so I think it's understandable that people,  especially young people would encourage them to do better. 

Also 25% may be a success story from your perspective, but is certainly not from any perspective. 

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Reminds me of a man who owned an up-market furniture shop, did a lot of business in furniture manufactured from endangered exotic hardwoods, mainly from the Far East. Couldn't sell enough of it. He also claimed to be an environmental activist and regularly attended demonstrations, including the big one in Peel about 20 years ago.

One day somebody challenged him about the conflict. The response was to giggle and walk away. 

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10 minutes ago, Non-Believer said:

Reminds me of a man who owned an up-market furniture shop, did a lot of business in furniture manufactured from endangered exotic hardwoods, mainly from the Far East. Couldn't sell enough of it. He also claimed to be an environmental activist and regularly attended demonstrations, including the big one in Peel about 20 years ago.

One day somebody challenged him about the conflict. The response was to giggle and walk away. 

Really? Endangered exotic hardwoods eh? Where was the shop?

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21 minutes ago, Chris C said:

Really? Endangered exotic hardwoods eh? Where was the shop?

Not many over here...have a look around. Any idea how long it takes a mahogany tree to grow to maturity? Check it out, and some Far Eastern hardwoods.

He even had a sign in the shop advising customers of the environmental toll that their purchases were making on the planet. Still took their money though. Utter hypocrite.

Edited by Non-Believer
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I'm not doubting you, I'm just interested in which shop. You can pm me if you don't want to name it. There are undoubtedly hypocrites who believe in climate change,  I don't deny that.

As reasons go for ignoring the impending shit storm despite near unanimous scientific evidence warning of the consequences however,  their existence is a  pretty poor one you'd have to agree?

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17 hours ago, pongo said:

I know people hate good news. Sorry.

I'm all for good news, I believe that everyone in every country should be doing their bit. The difficulty is that many decisions, at the moment, are based on technology which isn't quite there. The storage of electricity, although improvements are being continually made, is problematical at present. The Isle of Man could easily fall under the spell of one of the many snake oil salesmen and blow what little cash we have available on one of the many failed generation systems which litter the world today. Is it better to work towards a carbon free environment, whilst observing what larger and more affluent regimes are doing? There is no uniquely Manx solution to this.

Whilst we all must be aware of the fact that our climate is changing, we have to accept that mankind's contribution may not be the sole cause. We have only had a stable climate for the past 10,000 years, just enough for civilisation to develop. That period is nothing in terms of the life of the planet and could it be that our attention should be more towards combatting the effects of future climate change rather than what could be the futile task of trying to prevent it?  

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They could very easily stick some bloody wind turbines in the sea. Just look east, there are thousands of them, we don't have any and its always windy. Its bonkers that we have none.

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Manx solutions for Manx problems.....that's the worrying, and will probably be expensive, bit....

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32 minutes ago, TheTeapot said:

They could very easily stick some bloody wind turbines in the sea. Just look east, there are thousands of them, we don't have any and its always windy. Its bonkers that we have none.

These turbines are dependent on government subsidies to be profitable, we are unable to afford to be in the same league.  

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10 minutes ago, Max Power said:

These turbines are dependent on government subsidies to be profitable, we are unable to afford to be in the same league.  

You know what else 'required' a massive government subsidy? A big gas power station in Pulrose.

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6 minutes ago, Max Power said:

These turbines are dependent on government subsidies to be profitable, we are unable to afford to be in the same league.

The turbines have a finite life - maybe 20 to 30 years (with regular blade replacement), but perhaps will be inefficient compared to newer developments in less than that.

On-shore wind farms will be easy to replace, but what about the off-shore ones. Will the gov. pay rather a lot of money to replace or update them, or will they simply left to be forever a shipping hazard and a basking shark chicane.

And you can forget about the tourist industry - come to the Isle of Man and see our wind turbines...

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On 9/25/2020 at 10:28 AM, Lagman said:

"We're not being listened to" - says climate campaigner -

 

Not climate campaigners in reality. There is no "climate emergency" that needs addressing on this island (or anywhere else for that matter). These kids are using the climate as a flag of convenience. They're watermellons: green on the outside but red under the surface. But they can't come out as the anti-capitalists they really are as they know that such a position cannot be substantiated to any critical-thinking individual. So they rely on fake/junk science readily provided by the likes of the BBC et al. to try to bring down the system they despise so much on the pretext of global warming etc.

Capitalism is far from perfect, I admit it, but it's the least-worst wealth-creating model yet formulated by mankind and infinitely preferable to their precious Communism with its inevitable mass starvations and persecution/imprisonment of all dissenters. I suggest these kids read some history for themselves and see how it always ends.

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1 hour ago, Max Power said:

These turbines are dependent on government subsidies to be profitable, we are unable to afford to be in the same league.  

The offshore ones yes. But onshore wind turbines are now as cheap or cheaper than any other form of electricity generation, and we have some of the best wind statistics of anywhere in the world. 

There is no economic or practical reason why we shouldn't be producing most of our energy from renewables. 

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