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Mental Health - Are we getting better?


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https://www.three.fm/news/isle-of-man-news/partnership-to-boost-island-mental-wellbeing/

Given the recent internal report (or customer satisfaction survey as some may say) into mental health services on the island (which is based on a less than 25% response and to me is so full of holes it is not worth the paper it is written on) this now pops us -virtue signalling and the start of mental health privatisation probably all rolled into one. 

Insurance companies are desperate to get hold of health related data so they can create the algorithms to work out the private insurance premiums. Worth nearly £10 billion in the UK - NHSX. 

Receipt of services from people only 'trained' by bodies such as this can be limited and potentially unfulfilling, with people then having to fall back on the statutory services where standards can be set and monitored by regulatory bodies. 

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It’s just that kind of comment that adds to the huge suicide rate in the young. If you don’t understand then educate yourselves. This isn’t a them and us situation, this is about all of us caring for

I don’t agree.  There were plenty of stressors in my life time Suez Cuba missiles Cyprus Decimation of the North by Thatcher, mass unemployment Miners strikes and riots

I disagree. I would say that there is far more stress related and anxiety issues now, especially in the young. The stresses they are under to conform and to perform, in the main due to social media an

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I would be interested in a comparison between mental health on the island in the 1980s, and mental health on the island now.  Are we less happy now than we were then?  When I worked on the island in 1983, one of the first Manx phrases I learned was"traa-dy-liooar" and people seemed more relaxed and easy going than they do now.  But maybe that's just me looking back with a rose tinted retrospectoscope (an ingenious medical device which gives you perfect clarity of vision looking backwards). 

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35 minutes ago, BallaDoc said:

I would be interested in a comparison between mental health on the island in the 1980s, and mental health on the island now.  Are we less happy now than we were then?  When I worked on the island in 1983, one of the first Manx phrases I learned was"traa-dy-liooar" and people seemed more relaxed and easy going than they do now.  But maybe that's just me looking back with a rose tinted retrospectoscope (an ingenious medical device which gives you perfect clarity of vision looking backwards). 

But I guess it depends on which orifice your ingenious medical device is inserted! Ouch....😲

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1 hour ago, BallaDoc said:

I would be interested in a comparison between mental health on the island in the 1980s, and mental health on the island now.  Are we less happy now than we were then?  When I worked on the island in 1983, one of the first Manx phrases I learned was"traa-dy-liooar" and people seemed more relaxed and easy going than they do now.  But maybe that's just me looking back with a rose tinted retrospectoscope (an ingenious medical device which gives you perfect clarity of vision looking backwards). 

Impossible to do, for many reasons.  Firstly, what is now labelled as a 'mental health issue' wasn't considered as such in the 1980s.  Secondly, everybody now emotes online, and virtually every case of being 'mildly annoyed' or 'slightly sad' is now a documented case.  Thirdly, probably as a consequence of this, people are now more open about their mental health, and it's moved from being a stigma to in some cases almost a badge of honour.

There were different stresses then, but not perhaps any more or less than now.  I suspect if an objective test were possible levels of mental health would be pretty much the same.

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It always surprised me that in the 70's and 80's, in Ard Aalinn Ward at Ballamona one could find a mixture of mental health issues all lumped together in the same place; depressives, schizotypals, manics, alcoholics and other addicts et al, all in one place. I got the impression that this policy was not really conducive to therapy and created problems for the patients. They were big on ECT up there in those days also and as a tender young RMN cadet nurse I remember being shocked (pun intended) at how that treatment was administered. Plus, the prolific use of 'liquid cosh' - Largactyl and other tranquilisers, rendered many patients into a semi-catatonic state leaving them malleable. Can't remember out-patient counselling being a thing either.

There existed a considerable amount of mental health staffing though, plenty of Consultants, RMN's and Nursing Assistants.

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My, that brings back memories.  I remember the twilight days of ECT too, when they had to call in the anaesthetist to give a quick general anaesthetic, briefly fry the patients brain with a few hundred volts and then wake them up again.  Goodness knows what that must have felt like waking up.  

I also remember the old timers telling stories of the 1950s when the main treatment for serious psychiatric conditions, other than ECT, was paraldehyde (also used by John Bodkin Adams the serial killer).  Paraldehyde was so toxic that if given by injection, it used to dissolve plastic syringes so you had to always remember to use a glass one.  There was so much of it used in the old asylums that paraldehyde vapour used to hang in the air and condense on surfaces.  In those days they used to wax the floors, and if you went down in the subfloor space, you would find stalactites of wax hanging under the floorboards which had been growing there for decades, and if you broke one open, it would be hollow and full of the condensed paraldehyde vapour which had turned to liquid.

Aye, those were the days. 

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Great story that, Doc. The short-term memory loss brought on by ECT treatment was alarming, some patients waking with no cognition of the procedure even taking place. Still in use though around the world. 

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1 hour ago, quilp said:

Great story that, Doc. The short-term memory loss brought on by ECT treatment was alarming, some patients waking with no cognition of the procedure even taking place. Still in use though around the world. 

Still in use on the Isle of Man.

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2 hours ago, BallaDoc said:

My, that brings back memories.  I remember the twilight days of ECT too, when they had to call in the anaesthetist to give a quick general anaesthetic, briefly fry the patients brain with a few hundred volts and then wake them up again.  Goodness knows what that must have felt like waking up.  

I also remember the old timers telling stories of the 1950s when the main treatment for serious psychiatric conditions, other than ECT, was paraldehyde (also used by John Bodkin Adams the serial killer).  Paraldehyde was so toxic that if given by injection, it used to dissolve plastic syringes so you had to always remember to use a glass one.  There was so much of it used in the old asylums that paraldehyde vapour used to hang in the air and condense on surfaces.  In those days they used to wax the floors, and if you went down in the subfloor space, you would find stalactites of wax hanging under the floorboards which had been growing there for decades, and if you broke one open, it would be hollow and full of the condensed paraldehyde vapour which had turned to liquid.

Aye, those were the days. 

That's an interesting and epically sad story.

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3 hours ago, wrighty said:

There were different stresses then, but not perhaps any more or less than now.  I suspect if an objective test were possible levels of mental health would be pretty much the same.

I'm not really sure that's true.  I get the impression mental health workers often tend to underestimate the effects of external factors on people's mental health: things like expensive and insecure rented accommodation rather than having your own place; poorly paid and insecure jobs; stresses at work caused by 'office politics' and modern employment practices.  You're more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety if you've got more to be depressed and anxious about.

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2 hours ago, BallaDoc said:

My, that brings back memories.  I remember the twilight days of ECT too, when they had to call in the anaesthetist to give a quick general anaesthetic, briefly fry the patients brain with a few hundred volts and then wake them up again.  Goodness knows what that must have felt like waking up.  

I also remember the old timers telling stories of the 1950s when the main treatment for serious psychiatric conditions, other than ECT, was paraldehyde (also used by John Bodkin Adams the serial killer).  Paraldehyde was so toxic that if given by injection, it used to dissolve plastic syringes so you had to always remember to use a glass one.  There was so much of it used in the old asylums that paraldehyde vapour used to hang in the air and condense on surfaces.  In those days they used to wax the floors, and if you went down in the subfloor space, you would find stalactites of wax hanging under the floorboards which had been growing there for decades, and if you broke one open, it would be hollow and full of the condensed paraldehyde vapour which had turned to liquid.

Aye, those were the days. 

Sometimes you feel the need for a response emoji that combines Thank you, Haha, Confused and Sad all at once.

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