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Mental Health - Are we getting better?


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I think there is a difference between personal and national "stress" in that the feeling of inclusion and support being 'part of it' makes it a different experience (for most people). Leadership is key as well. When it is short of what is needed  national anxiety rises creating tensions amongst people. Global stress takes it to another level. 

Personal circumstances as shared above can be mitigated by so many factors - upbringing, family, education, religion, personal philosophy, the list is endless. 

 "Mental health issues" can manifest into "mental illness" over time when not addressed or not identified as a developing condition - eg periods of isolation assessed as depression rather than an indicator of schizophrenia and drug and alcohol increases used to 'drown out' visual and or auditory irregularities.

 

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I don’t agree.  There were plenty of stressors in my life time Suez Cuba missiles Cyprus Decimation of the North by Thatcher, mass unemployment Miners strikes and riots

It’s just that kind of comment that adds to the huge suicide rate in the young. If you don’t understand then educate yourselves. This isn’t a them and us situation, this is about all of us caring for

Probably edited as it’s not whole service facing collapse but the family & young persons services elements which will have no funding after this year.    you would think we should be puttin

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15 hours ago, thesultanofsheight said:

Not sure. I’ve never stood in a 6ft trench wearing a tin helmet whilst someone blasts machine gun fire 4” above my head for 4 years. I imagine it’s more stressful than a lockdown situation. But that’s not doing down how stressful lockdown has been for many. 

Thank you for clarifying my point.

A) Does discussing a different type of stress or context denigrate others? If not, as you state, why mention them?

B) Does grading stressors (i.e. one thing is ‘more’ stressful than another) assist anyone in dealing with either? The insinuation I perceive is that because some people have endured great stress others should not, which seems a bit illogical to me. John has stated an alternative purpose - to learn - but that never seems to be included in the comparisons I see. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone say... “many people endured great stress during historical periods of violence, and they were treated using these methods, or this method didn’t work... so we should try this...”

C) We know many people made great sacrifices. Could it be that guilt over what society has done with the freedoms hard won plays in to a reaction - that nobody should complain because of a skewed perception of degrading efforts? This aligns with the concept of freedom bringing its own stresses. 

 

Edited by James Hampton
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There are a myriad of circumstances that create what we call 'stress' . It is the individuals physical and psychological unique reaction that determines the clinical assessment as suggested by John Wright's post above. 

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1 minute ago, Apple said:

There are a myriad of circumstances that create what we call 'stress' . It is the individuals physical and psychological unique reaction that determines the clinical assessment as suggested by John Wright's post above. 

And it’s worth pointing out that individual reaction to identical stressors can change not only by individual person, but by class, locality, gender, era. Think Victorian women and hysteric paralysis or catatonic state.

@James Hampton I think you’re over analysing what’s being said. It started with someone saying that stress now was worse than ever, and others responding that every generation has its own stressors. Not sure anyone has tried to rank them.

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12 hours ago, John Wright said:

 

@James Hampton I think you’re over analysing what’s being said. It started with someone saying that stress now was worse than ever, and others responding that every generation has its own stressors. Not sure anyone has tried to rank them.

My observation wasn’t limited to this thread or even this forum, it appears to be a common reaction to discussions of current stress related issues - to compare them with historical ones, which are generally portrayed as being ‘more’ stressful. The implication I assume from such a response is that current stressors are therefore somehow ‘less’ impactful, and presumably can therefore be remedied simply by the knowledge that things have been ‘worse’. More, less, worse all being forms of ranking no?

The Sultan provided a pertinent example of exactly this - though noted the point on downplaying current issues. 

The point was simply that I don’t really understand why such issues often seem to generate comparisons in reaction. Is it because stress is something often presented through communication rather than a physical injury which can be manifest without any discussion? 

When I cut the top of my finger off the lads I was working with didn’t react by telling me about how their grandad had his legs amputated, they laughed at my request for a plaster, told me to stop being a dick and get in the van so someone could drive me to A&E. See the difference? 

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What we call 'stress' or even 'adversity' has always been around. Humans are constantly having to continually adapt to our ever changing environment and outside experiences. That notion of necessity leading to invention has determined the development of  intelligence to the level if has so far to deal with the differing problems we constantly face, mostly the result of human existence.

How we deal with those ever changing circumstances both as individuals and as people will either bring out the best or the worst of us all. 

The real test is what leadership there is to surmount our problems and what else we can individually call upon - family, friends, experts, etc. 

Maybe I have missed Mr Hampton's point here but comparisons in time can never work where there are constants. Apologies if I have misunderstood your point.

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1 hour ago, quilp said:

https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/manx-addiction-service-faces-collapse-without-funding/

Shouldn't our great and good step up and assist with funding this organisation? If they go down the pan, what's left for those in need, our already over-stretched mental health service? 

Yes they should as the family & young persons services which aren’t provided elsewhere will go. The COVID issue has caused major increases in demand for all mental health services at a time funding has reduced!

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On 10/23/2020 at 10:31 AM, quilp said:

It always surprised me that in the 70's and 80's, in Ard Aalinn Ward at Ballamona one could find a mixture of mental health issues all lumped together in the same place; depressives, schizotypals, manics, alcoholics and other addicts et al, all in one place. I got the impression that this policy was not really conducive to therapy and created problems for the patients. They were big on ECT up there in those days also and as a tender young RMN cadet nurse I remember being shocked (pun intended) at how that treatment was administered. Plus, the prolific use of 'liquid cosh' - Largactyl and other tranquilisers, rendered many patients into a semi-catatonic state leaving them malleable. Can't remember out-patient counselling being a thing either.

There existed a considerable amount of mental health staffing though, plenty of Consultants, RMN's and Nursing Assistants.

I gave up trying to be a RMN after a stint in Cronk Coar on work experience, I couldn't believe what went on there - one woman wasn't allowed her cigarettes because she'd wet herself, another wasn't allowed off the ward (even for a walk up the corridor) because she might wander - where to? The doors were locked. Shame really because that's what I wanted to do for a job, not 100% unrewarding accounts. I too thought it might have been quite counter productive have the depressed people in with the junkies and plonkies.   

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1 hour ago, quilp said:

https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/manx-addiction-service-faces-collapse-without-funding/

Shouldn't our great and good step up and assist with funding this organisation? If they go down the pan, what's left for those in need, our already over-stretched mental health service? 

Totally, especially if they've clawed back £68.9 million. Rather than spunking money on water slides and vanity projects they need to start supporting projects like this. Especially now. I mean what's more important this or horse trams burning money each year? It's crazy really.

@quilp your link is broken seems to have updated to:
https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/manx-addiction-services-struggling-without-funding/
 

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2 hours ago, quilp said:

https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/manx-addiction-service-faces-collapse-without-funding/

Shouldn't our great and good step up and assist with funding this organisation? If they go down the pan, what's left for those in need, our already over-stretched mental health service? 

Unless I am mistaken doesn’t this have overtones of the last alcohol/gambling/drug addiction charity Motiv8? 

If this one is neglected, another Government pet project will appear, with instant Government favouritism and then allocated funding. However later down the line the perpetual circle of underfunding and neglect will affect this one, hence an ongoing circle. 

 

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23 minutes ago, slinkydevil said:

Totally, especially if they've clawed back £68.9 million. Rather than spunking money on water slides and vanity projects they need to start supporting projects like this. Especially now. I mean what's more important this or horse trams burning money each year? It's crazy really.

@quilp your link is broken seems to have updated to:
https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/manx-addiction-services-struggling-without-funding/
 

So the "faces collapse" was edited.

Dead right about the surplus and the vanity projects. Didn't government remove the £100k funding for DASH previously? Be interesting to hear any remarks from mhk's, you know, those who work FOR US. 

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