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Attack of the telegraph poles


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Well that's what happens when you privatise public services. Manx Telecom have spent the last 40 years making millions in profits from running a monopoly on the previous infrastructure that was paid f

I agree with Mr Pacey.  It's an outrage in such an area of outstanding natural beauty and historic architectural significance as a bungalow estate in Colby. 

Hence the objections. They'd be absolutely fine with it if it were Windows XP, everyone wants that coursing through their veins. Still, they should just be glad it's not Vista.

4 minutes ago, Cambon said:

Yes, but the biggest limiting factor is wireless, which is what most people use. In fact, I don't think I know anyone who has a cabled home network anymore. 

How do imagine that wireless gets into people's office and homes? Or how 5G will be delivered?

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1 hour ago, Cambon said:

I just think in these days of wireless and 5G, why are they using an archaic cable system that will be vulnerable to bad weather. 

Depending on the technology you're using, some wireless broadband can be massively impacted by rain etc.

Fibre optic on the other hand is just glass fibres, they're pretty waterproof, as evidenced by the fact that we have quite a few of the cables running through the Irish Sea to keep us online.

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51 minutes ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

Depending on the technology you're using, some wireless broadband can be massively impacted by rain etc.

Fibre optic on the other hand is just glass fibres, they're pretty waterproof, as evidenced by the fact that we have quite a few of the cables running through the Irish Sea to keep us online.

The capacity issues on local microwave link or other EMF non cable link systems, and the susceptibility to atmospherics, rain, and other interference is the problem.

I have a microwave link internet connection in Spain. The nearest phone exchange is 10 miles away. We do have copper wire phone cables but they don’t have internet capacity. 

Thunderstorms, rain, sunspots even temperature, time of day, barometric pressure, all affect internet reception. And when school is out the village kids are home and speed drops. We get our fill of UK TV by an iptv box and it’s not able to connect most evenings. Great at 3 in the morning, or even 10. 

We are the end of the line for the internet, fixed  phone and overhead electric. Signal for internet comes to a 20cm dish on the gable. That picks up from a transmitter aerial 100m away, which serves 5 houses. It receives via a 30cm dish from the nearest village in line of sight. About a km away. There are 25 houses there, all accessing from the signal before us. The signal to there comes from a repeater/booster on a hill top and that receives from and transmits to another larger village further down the valley. And so on. We are lucky that the Catalan, Tarragona and Alt Camp councils subsidise the system for rural access. Eventually there’s a link to the fixed optic cable 10km away.

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2 hours ago, John Wright said:

The capacity issues on local microwave link or other EMF non cable link systems, and the susceptibility to atmospherics, rain, and other interference is the problem.

I have a microwave link internet connection in Spain. The nearest phone exchange is 10 miles away. We do have copper wire phone cables but they don’t have internet capacity. 

Thunderstorms, rain, sunspots even temperature, time of day, barometric pressure, all affect internet reception. And when school is out the village kids are home and speed drops. We get our fill of UK TV by an iptv box and it’s not able to connect most evenings. Great at 3 in the morning, or even 10. 

We are the end of the line for the internet, fixed  phone and overhead electric. Signal for internet comes to a 20cm dish on the gable. That picks up from a transmitter aerial 100m away, which serves 5 houses. It receives via a 30cm dish from the nearest village in line of sight. About a km away. There are 25 houses there, all accessing from the signal before us. The signal to there comes from a repeater/booster on a hill top and that receives from and transmits to another larger village further down the valley. And so on. We are lucky that the Catalan, Tarragona and Alt Camp councils subsidise the system for rural access. Eventually there’s a link to the fixed optic cable 10km away.

Rural internet is hard, contention is an issue even in metropolitan areas. At a guess, the new fibre being run will be a passive optical network, where high-speed fibre is shared between anything up to 256 houses along a line. The system just uses some clever division to make sure that nothing interferes.

I think Starlink could be promising for use-cases such as yours, the low satellites and subsequent latency looks really quite promising, though not being particularly cheap. Mark Handley gives a really good explanation of the benefits, based on figures from FCC filings etc.

 

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6 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

Rural internet is hard, contention is an issue even in metropolitan areas. At a guess, the new fibre being run will be a passive optical network, where high-speed fibre is shared between anything up to 256 houses along a line. The system just uses some clever division to make sure that nothing interferes.

I think Starlink could be promising for use-cases such as yours, the low satellites and subsequent latency looks really quite promising, though not being particularly cheap. Mark Handley gives a really good explanation of the benefits, based on figures from FCC filings etc.

 

Yes we are waiting. As we average 3-4 months a year the costing will be interesting. At present we pay €55 a month for “up to” 12mbps, unlimited. Clearly we still pay in months when we neither upload or download. A system that only charged when we used might be good.

That being said the system is subsidised. And the firm that operates it upgrades capacity/speed twice a year. It’s usually ok for a couple of months, but then more people have signed up or bought more games or equipment to consume bandwidth.

Theres no 3/4G signal either!

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Leave Arbory in the Stone Age. Pause the roll out and let them argue it out amongst their old fashioned selves.

Move on.

Many other people will be happy with telegraph poles...as they are with street lamps.

The complainers probably can't even spell 'Internet' nevermind explain it. And most complainers were never even from here originally anyway.

Edited by Albert Tatlock
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The alternative is digging, labour and ducting to every property....under lawns, drives, garden walls, paviors, whatever. Expensive to any concern, let alone one accustomed to a milking monopoly.

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