Jump to content

Vaccine- who will have it?


Recommended Posts

46 minutes ago, John Wright said:

 

Roll out is predicated by the supply, not just the amount available in total, but frequency of delivery. It’s also predicated by your delivery plan. IOM has taken a perfectly valid decision to follow the 21 day gap between doses AND to not vaccinate anyone unless the second dose is here. It’s very belt and braces but I’ve no doubt it’s the best clinical practice in an ideal world.

Roll out is then predicated by infrastructure, the number of places you have to vaccinate from, the number of qualified vaccinators, and the number of trained support staff. Support staff includes the people sorting out the letters, the people staffing 111, receptionists at the vaccination point, those administering informed consent, those keeping accurate record of name, address, GP, date of birth, NHS number, type of vaccine, batch number, as well as those handling the vaccine, overseeing transport, safe storage at appropriate temperatures, thawing, disposal of sharps.

You don’t start at full capacity. You work up, develop, extend, recruit, train and expand capacity, learning and speeding up as you go.

What he’s told us is the most efficient way. We can’t just drop everything else at GP surgeries, Nobles, pharmacies, 111, testing.

Did he say when the large vaccination centre at Ronaldsway will open? You wouldn’t open at full capacity. 

Sounds like the plan is considered, practical, pragmatic and achievable.

Sounds like another gold standard infallible plan like the one we had around testing which worked well😂

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

So it's not a bypass of fact checking that's accelerating this. Usually, vaccine development is a project like any other. Take the Prom for example. You put in an order or request for a bunch of

I'll have it.  I'm not going to be trying to jump the queue or otherwise particularly seek it out though, but if someone at the hospital approaches me with a needle I won't run away. The safety f

I'll definitely have it. So amusing to watch those brave and bold people who didn't mind/care if they got the virus (and in so doing not knowing how it would affect them) now hand wringing over the sa

Posted Images

48 minutes ago, John Wright said:

 

Roll out is predicated by the supply, not just the amount available in total, but frequency of delivery. It’s also predicated by your delivery plan. IOM has taken a perfectly valid decision to follow the 21 day gap between doses AND to not vaccinate anyone unless the second dose is here. It’s very belt and braces but I’ve no doubt it’s the best clinical practice in an ideal world.

Roll out is then predicated by infrastructure, the number of places you have to vaccinate from, the number of qualified vaccinators, and the number of trained support staff. Support staff includes the people sorting out the letters, the people staffing 111, receptionists at the vaccination point, those administering informed consent, those keeping accurate record of name, address, GP, date of birth, NHS number, type of vaccine, batch number, as well as those handling the vaccine, overseeing transport, safe storage at appropriate temperatures, thawing, disposal of sharps.

You don’t start at full capacity. You work up, develop, extend, recruit, train and expand capacity, learning and speeding up as you go.

What he’s told us is the most efficient way. We can’t just drop everything else at GP surgeries, Nobles, pharmacies, 111, testing.

Did he say when the large vaccination centre at Ronaldsway will open? You wouldn’t open at full capacity. 

Sounds like the plan is considered, practical, pragmatic and achievable.

All of the above was fine, but was also conceived at a time when there was no open ended lockdown and community transmission. I recall Ashford saying that there was 'no hurry', and I had no real issue with that position at that point in time. Now that there are potentially real economic and health consequences to their considered, practical, pragmatic and achievable plan, the planners need to at least revisit their plan and then publish the results of the review. Project parameters change, and plans therefore need to be flexible.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Wright said:

 

Roll out is predicated by the supply, not just the amount available in total, but frequency of delivery. It’s also predicated by your delivery plan. IOM has taken a perfectly valid decision to follow the 21 day gap between doses AND to not vaccinate anyone unless the second dose is here. It’s very belt and braces but I’ve no doubt it’s the best clinical practice in an ideal world.

Roll out is then predicated by infrastructure, the number of places you have to vaccinate from, the number of qualified vaccinators, and the number of trained support staff. Support staff includes the people sorting out the letters, the people staffing 111, receptionists at the vaccination point, those administering informed consent, those keeping accurate record of name, address, GP, date of birth, NHS number, type of vaccine, batch number, as well as those handling the vaccine, overseeing transport, safe storage at appropriate temperatures, thawing, disposal of sharps.

You don’t start at full capacity. You work up, develop, extend, recruit, train and expand capacity, learning and speeding up as you go.

What he’s told us is the most efficient way. We can’t just drop everything else at GP surgeries, Nobles, pharmacies, 111, testing.

Did he say when the large vaccination centre at Ronaldsway will open? You wouldn’t open at full capacity. 

Sounds like the plan is considered, practical, pragmatic and achievable.

It's strange because I partly see you point and I am not one of the reckless panic mob.

However I do think that the rigid adoption of assuming stocks will suddenly stop is too negative. We should have an increasing rate I agree and I also see your point about preparedness and build up.

However we are a bit too far on the cautious side and it's not like we have been taken by surprise. It's a month now since we got the first batch and we knew it was coming before that.

It worries me that we are out of step with our peer Nations and I feel that may come back to haunt us.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Happier diner said:

It's strange because I partly see you point and I am not one of the reckless panic mob.

However I do think that the rigid adoption of assuming stocks will suddenly stop is too negative. We should have an increasing rate I agree and I also see your point about preparedness and build up.

However we are a bit too far on the cautious side and it's not like we have been taken by surprise. It's a month now since we got the first batch and we knew it was coming before that.

It worries me that we are out of step with our peer Nations and I feel that may come back to haunt us.

 

We are not in the UK. There is a small handful of community cases after one week. We will get a few more. If people really knuckle down and stay home, we will, I  reality be clear in two week. Keeping the three week rolling back up is the correct thing to do. 

Sorry, but this time our guys are spot on! 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Cambon said:

We are not in the UK. There is a small handful of community cases after one week. We will get a few more. If people really knuckle down and stay home, we will, I  reality be clear in two week. Keeping the three week rolling back up is the correct thing to do. 

Sorry, but this time our guys are spot on! 

Jesus Cambon, the haters aren't gonna like that.:D

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Happier diner said:

I'm afraid that's not right. Do the maths

 

It takes exactly the same time to inject an identical number of recipients with two doses assuming you inject the same number each week in each cohort, whether you start second dose after 3 or 12 weeks.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, John Wright said:

It takes exactly the same time to inject an identical number of recipients with two doses assuming you inject the same number each week in each cohort, whether you start second dose after 3 or 12 weeks.

Exactly! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Cambon said:

We are not in the UK. There is a small handful of community cases after one week.

There's 24 current community cases after two weeks (how long ago New Year's Eve seems).  At least six of them they don't who they caught it from, which suggests there are lot more cases out there and that the methods they have for tracking aren't working.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Roger Mexico said:

There's 24 current community cases after two weeks (how long ago New Year's Eve seems).  At least six of them they don't who they caught it from, which suggests there are lot more cases out there and that the methods they have for tracking aren't working.

Indeed. Likely to mushroom next week IMO.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

There's 24 current community cases after two weeks (how long ago New Year's Eve seems).  At least six of them they don't who they caught it from, which suggests there are lot more cases out there and that the methods they have for tracking aren't working.

Absolutely. However, after one week of lockdown, if the majority of people are doing what they are supposed to do, those lines of transmission should have been nipped in the bud. If people continue doing the right thing, from this time next week there will be no new community cases. Construction, etc will go back. Pubs etc will open two weeks later. Best case scenario. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

From where we are all opinions on next week are valid. We just have to sit it out. Then truth will out, no doubt.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Wright said:

It takes exactly the same time to inject an identical number of recipients with two doses assuming you inject the same number each week in each cohort, whether you start second dose after 3 or 12 weeks.

Are you sure. Unless you miss a week, week 4 sees you doing double weeks 1 to 3

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...