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Leicester University to 'decolonise' English


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I think you've made the point here John why many are uncomfortable about the decolonisation of literature. That post you've just made is politics from start to finish, as is decolonisation. I'd also a

But why is there a need for racial overtones? Chaucer is virtually the beginning of the English language as we now know it, surely any study of English literature begins with his works. The later dive

Many British colonies of the past embraced 'The Great Tradition' of English literature: the USA; Canada; Australia; New Zealand; India; colonial Africa; the Caribbean etc. Countries from South America

5 minutes ago, Max Power said:

What on earth is going on in the minds of these people? English literature and its legends and myths are what make the country and its people what it is. What exactly does decolonisation consist of and who benefits from it? 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/01/20/chaucer-courses-replaced-modules-race-sexuality-university-leicester/

What is the relevance of this to the IOM? 

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24 minutes ago, Max Power said:

What on earth is going on in the minds of these people? English literature and its legends and myths are what make the country and its people what it is. What exactly does decolonisation consist of and who benefits from it? 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/01/20/chaucer-courses-replaced-modules-race-sexuality-university-leicester/

I agree completely.  All Telegraph writers are clearly insane and should be sanctioned immediately.  Who knows what they will get up to if left out in society.  To be on the safe side, all Telegraph readers should be subject to intense deradicalisation programmes and not allowed to go anywhere near dangerous objects such as motorcars.

Putting links up to stuff that is behind paywalls is even sillier than links to articles that have nothing to do with the Isle of Man, but at a guess I would say that Leicester University English Department are dropping their Middle English module because very few students want to study it and are more interested in looking at the literature in English that was written in most of the World for most of the last Century.

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24 minutes ago, Max Power said:

What on earth is going on in the minds of these people? English literature and its legends and myths are what make the country and its people what it is. What exactly does decolonisation consist of and who benefits from it? 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/01/20/chaucer-courses-replaced-modules-race-sexuality-university-leicester/

Academic study and public consumption of English Literature has always been political and subject to whims, fads and fashion, Max.

Shakespeare went out of performance fashion, several times over 500 years. Many writers, good, bad and indifferent, move from readable to unreadable from politically acceptable to unacceptable.

Hall-Caine was the highest paid “English” author for 20 years. Personally I find his writing unreadable. There are much better Anglo=Manx authors. And, in my opinion, to claim TE Brown as the national poet speaks of desperation, most of its doggerel, apart from the dialect performance pieces.

Who, nowadays, reads Thackeray, or Trollope, or even Scott. How about Kipling or Rider Haggard, or WE Johns and John Buchan.

My secondary school reading for public exams was Shakespeare and Dickens. The lower forms ( academically - allegedly ) got Miller, Durrel and Laurie Lee. How I wished I could change forms.

English at university is ever changing. The canon of English literature ever expands. Chaucer won’t go away, but dropping it from the study of development of the language, at one institution, and replacing it with study of topics of current interest or emphasis in modern literature and tracing development of treatment of sex, gender and sexuality in literature isn’t retrograde. 

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39 minutes ago, 2112 said:

What is the relevance of this to the IOM? 

 

11 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

I agree completely.  All Telegraph writers are clearly insane and should be sanctioned immediately.  Who knows what they will get up to if left out in society.  To be on the safe side, all Telegraph readers should be subject to intense deradicalisation programmes and not allowed to go anywhere near dangerous objects such as motorcars.

Putting links up to stuff that is behind paywalls is even sillier than links to articles that have nothing to do with the Isle of Man, but at a guess I would say that Leicester University English Department are dropping their Middle English module because very few students want to study it and are more interested in looking at the literature in English that was written in most of the World for most of the last Century.

a) It's in general chat?

b) I haven't paid anything and can read it ok?

c) If you are studying the English literature, surely some of its early works should be required reading?

d) I'm not a Telegraph reader.

e) What does decolonisation mean when referring to English literature? 

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52 minutes ago, Max Power said:

What on earth is going on in the minds of these people? English literature and its legends and myths are what make the country and its people what it is. What exactly does decolonisation consist of and who benefits from it? 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/01/20/chaucer-courses-replaced-modules-race-sexuality-university-leicester/

what's the point of putting a link that won't open unless you subscribe or take the free trial...

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The Arts was decolonised a long time ago and the canon well and truly trashed. This is just further evidence of what's been going on. Universities have been churning out illiterate Arts students for years and filling their heads full of bullshit leftist ideologies and identity politics. This is the same kind of change that the BLM movement have been pushing. It goes much  deeper than literary fashions. 

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6 minutes ago, Max Power said:

 

e) What does decolonisation mean when referring to English literature? 

When used about any academic study decolonisation means:

Decolonising the curriculum is about recognising and challenging the colonial roots and Western biases of what we teach, how we teach it, and what we value in our students’ work.

It isn’t about the token inclusion of the intellectual achievements of non-white cultures, but instead involves a paradigm shift: from a culture of exclusion and denial, to the making of space for other political philosophies and knowledge systems. It’s a culture shift to think more widely about why common knowledge is what it is, and in so doing adjusting cultural perceptions and power relations in real and significant ways1.

The challenge to decolonise the curriculum emerges from critical race studies but, as we develop our teaching, we can and should also be thinking about gender, sexuality, disability, and social class. We know that some of our students feel disconnected from what we do in the School, and there’s a perception that we only value white voices and ideas. We therefore urgently need to address this - decolonising the curriculum is one approach we can all take, in combination with other measures being implemented.

 

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45 minutes ago, dilligaf said:

Can’t change history, just learn from it. World’s gone mad trying to change or hide what has passed.

History changes depending who won or lost, who writes it and who reads and interprets it.

Looking at a wider range of sources, from different ages, countries and cultures widens English literature. It doesn’t change it. Unless you think that English literature is only something from a small island off the north west coast of Europe written exclusively by white little Engerlanders.

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1 hour ago, John Wright said:

History changes depending who won or lost, who writes it and who reads and interprets it.

Looking at a wider range of sources, from different ages, countries and cultures widens English literature. It doesn’t change it. Unless you think that English literature is only something from a small island off the north west coast of Europe written exclusively by white little Engerlanders.

Love your dismissive terminology at the end there. Any need ?

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2 hours ago, John Wright said:

. And, in my opinion, to claim TE Brown as the national poet speaks of desperation, most of its doggerel, apart from the dialect performance pieces.

 

Growing up I used to enjoy the TE Brown dialect performances, usually related by various genres of Manxmen: MLC, farmer, joiner etc. The dialect was manly, strong and authentic.

These days I just hear a high pitched squeaky theatrical 'manx' voice.

Oh what has changed on this Island?

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22 minutes ago, dilligaf said:

Love your dismissive terminology at the end there. Any need ?

Yes. It makes the point.

English is a universal language, with many versions and dialects. Do you want the study of English to be limited to the product of 50 million Englishmen and their geographic white  linguistic ancestors?

Or should it embrace the Scots, Irish, Americans, Canadians, Australians, Indians, Pakistani, Caribbean, East, West and South Africans who write in English as a first language, whatever their origin, or those who write in English despite it being a second language?

Its exactly the same as BLM for that matter, in my opinion. If you feel uncomfortable it’s because you are insecure and want certainty. But there is no certainty in how history has been recorded and presented or how literature presents and what it’s written about.

It’s all about interpretation. If someone finds it difficult to accept that Colston was a slaver, that the money that made Liverpool, Lancaster, Bristol, London was made from the trade in human beings, or believes that it isn’t tied in to white privilege and entitlement, then no doubt they’ll find comfort in perceived historic certainties and realities. 

 

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