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This is one Food Revolution I won't be joining


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On 2/5/2021 at 9:07 AM, BallaDoc said:

A golden opportunity to join the food revolution and boost the island's economy:

http://www.iomtoday.co.im/article.cfm?id=60351&headline=Golden opportunity to join the food revolution and boost the island's economy&sectionIs=NEWS&searchyear=2021

So says billionaire entrepreneur and island resident Jim Mellon, whose big idea is for farmers to have "bioreactors in which cells from a cow are fed a cocktail of nutrients growing into edible tissue", also known as cell cultured meat.  He is so keen on alternative approaches to current intensive farming methods that he has written a 283-page book called Moo’s Law about this.

I agree with him that we need alternative approaches to current intensive farming methods, and in fact I am already producing food by alternative methods.  It's called an "allotment", one of the old fashioned kind which involves carting wheelbarrowloads of manure and compost around and getting rather dirty.  I think that anyone who has high-tech fantasies about producing food by cell culture, vertical farming, high yielding genetically engineered hybrids and so on, should actually try producing some food themselves and find out what it's like in real life.

So I read the article and thought to myself "This is a man who has probably never tried growing his own food.  He probably doesn't even have a vegetable patch."  And as he gave his address in the news article as Collinson House, Port Erin, I thought I would have a quick look on Google Satellite and see if I was right.

And I was.  Not only that, there is no greenery to be seen anywhere at Collinson House.  Not even a blade of grass.  Look for yourself:

image.thumb.png.4288f6432708207ce5b7eade5a8d40c8.png 

I think I'll give the cell cultured meat a pass and stick to my allotment.

Well. One day it's going to be either that...or....grilled millipede

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I'd agree, synthesised 'meat' just isn't cricket. 

Judging by Balladoc's carrots he's already trying it!

there's fuck all intensive about the islands farming !!   the abattoir can barely  tick over.     i guess there's intensive subsidy and grant grabbing, maybe that's what's the reference was referring

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On 2/5/2021 at 9:07 AM, BallaDoc said:

 

So says billionaire entrepreneur and island resident Jim Mellon, whose big idea is for farmers to have "bioreactors in which cells from a cow are fed a cocktail of nutrients growing into edible tissue", also known as cell cultured meat.  He is so keen on alternative approaches to current intensive farming methods that he has written a 283-page book called Moo’s Law about this.

I agree with him that we need alternative approaches to current intensive farming methods, and in fact I am already producing food by alternative methods.  It's called an "allotment", one of the old fashioned kind which involves carting wheelbarrowloads of manure and compost around and getting rather dirty.  I think that anyone who has high-tech fantasies about producing food by cell culture, vertical farming, high yielding genetically engineered hybrids and so on, should actually try producing some food themselves and find out what it's like in real life.

You do realise that pretty much every crop and meat source that we eat are 'genetically engineered' through the use of selective breeding over generations?  Even those carrots and potatoes that you grow on your allotment have been deliberately bred to be the way they are now over centuries. 

I think that cell cultured meat is going to be the future.  It will mean the end of huge cattle farms that destroy natural habitats and will provide a source of meat that is 'cruelty' free.  I don't understand why people are squeamish about eating cell cultured meat but will happily eat meat that comes from animals?

 

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I think there's a lot of misunderstanding about genetically engineered food, both among its supporters and detractors.  I don't have a problem actually eating genetically engineered food because I think it's inherently just as healthy (or unhealthy) as any other sort of food.  It all gets broken down to its component molecules inside the body anyway.

However, I do have a problem with the system within which it operates.  Genetically engineered plants are bred to be resistant to pesticides and herbicides and to require the soil to be supplemented with artificial nutrients, which encourages farmers to use more of all of the above, with damaging results to the environment: insects are currently in catastrophic decline and nobody knows where that story is going to end - fancy hand-pollinating a field of crops, anyone?

Also, the contract of sale of genetically modified seed prohibits farmers from saving seed from the crops and re-planting it the next year (even if this was possible: hybrids often don't breed true from the parents).  So the farmers have to re-buy the seed every year, and worse still, if some of the genetically modified pollen finds its way onto a neighbouring farmer's land and hybridises with his crops, that farmer may become liable for legal penalties if he re-sows his own seed.

This year on my allotment I am experimenting with heritage variety, open pollinated crops where you save the seed for re-planting every year and it becomes acclimatised to the local environment - technically this is called a "landrace" and it doesn't occur with genetically engineered crops for the above reasons.   

Edited by BallaDoc
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1 hour ago, manxman1980 said:

You do realise that pretty much every crop and meat source that we eat are 'genetically engineered' through the use of selective breeding over generations?  Even those carrots and potatoes that you grow on your allotment have been deliberately bred to be the way they are now over centuries. 

I think that cell cultured meat is going to be the future.  It will mean the end of huge cattle farms that destroy natural habitats and will provide a source of meat that is 'cruelty' free.  I don't understand why people are squeamish about eating cell cultured meat but will happily eat meat that comes from animals?

 

I have only one question.... what does this cell cultured 'meat' taste of?

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2 hours ago, BallaDoc said:

This year on my allotment I am experimenting with heritage variety, open pollinated crops where you save the seed for re-planting every year and it becomes acclimatised to the local environment - technically this is called a "landrace" and it doesn't occur with genetically engineered crops for the above reasons.   

Yes, you have misunderstood that 'genetic engineering' also takes place through selective breeding of plants to produce the results we want.  Not as quick as genetically modifying something in the lab but it is still genetic engineering although our ancestors would not have known that.

What heritage varieties are you experimenting with?  It would be interesting to see how far removed they are from the wild plants that predated them.

2 hours ago, Andy Onchan said:

I have only one question.... what does this cell cultured 'meat' taste of?

I believe it tastes the same as non cell cultured meat but haven't had a chance to try it.  I think the cell cultured meat is also leaner. 

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10 hours ago, BallaDoc said:

I think there's a lot of misunderstanding about genetically engineered food, both among its supporters and detractors.  I don't have a problem actually eating genetically engineered food because I think it's inherently just as healthy (or unhealthy) as any other sort of food.  It all gets broken down to its component molecules inside the body anyway.

However, I do have a problem with the system within which it operates.  Genetically engineered plants are bred to be resistant to pesticides and herbicides and to require the soil to be supplemented with artificial nutrients, which encourages farmers to use more of all of the above, with damaging results to the environment: insects are currently in catastrophic decline and nobody knows where that story is going to end - fancy hand-pollinating a field of crops, anyone?

Also, the contract of sale of genetically modified seed prohibits farmers from saving seed from the crops and re-planting it the next year (even if this was possible: hybrids often don't breed true from the parents).  So the farmers have to re-buy the seed every year, and worse still, if some of the genetically modified pollen finds its way onto a neighbouring farmer's land and hybridises with his crops, that farmer may become liable for legal penalties if he re-sows his own seed.

This year on my allotment I am experimenting with heritage variety, open pollinated crops where you save the seed for re-planting every year and it becomes acclimatised to the local environment - technically this is called a "landrace" and it doesn't occur with genetically engineered crops for the above reasons.   

All of my veg is grown from last years seeds. I have no idea what type they were initially, I just select the biggest veg. and then use the seed off that. I re-call that the tomatoes came from a shop bought tomato about ten years ago, the onions from an onion that went to seed I don't know how many years ago. Runner beans, potatoes, strawberries and beetroot are ok. but I do have difficulty with carrots. The parsnips I don't know where they first came from. All the trees and bushes and most of the flowers are from cuttings or seeds. Some grow well, some grow poorly and some are just rubbish but I find it both interesting and brilliant  when it works well.

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13 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

I do have difficulty with carrots. 

IMG_5166.thumb.jpg.9ad806ffc624acf5a71967bebad70d24.jpg

So do I.  These are my last year's Frankencarrots: not, as you might think, genetically engineered, but mainly a result of over-manuring them and not digging the ground properly.

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I think id rather eat petri dish grown chicken breast than chicken breast that has spent its life in a cage surrounded by other chickens and their waste. 

I can see in the near future where fast food and cheap meals no longer contain actual animals. Once lab grown meat becomes viable commercially it will be McD's and the like that will pounce on it and if the customer cant tell i dont see whats wrong with it, maybe you could do it at home !

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2 hours ago, TomTucker said:

maybe you could do it at home 

It needs a lot of electricity to make lab / factory grown meat (protein has a high calorific value). So it will be produced in places where electricity is naturally inexpensive to produce or close to free.

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Israel is leading a lot of the investment and research. It's currently a premium option for wealthy early adopters. But soon enough they are the only people who can afford meat from animals (though I could see eating meat that being viewed by future generations rather like cannibalism is today).

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9 hours ago, TomTucker said:

I think id rather eat petri dish grown chicken breast than chicken breast that has spent its life in a cage surrounded by other chickens and their waste. 

I can see in the near future where fast food and cheap meals no longer contain actual animals. Once lab grown meat becomes viable commercially it will be McD's and the like that will pounce on it and if the customer cant tell i dont see whats wrong with it, maybe you could do it at home !

Haven't Subway recently been outed for having bread less bread and Tuna free Tuna?

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