Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It's because it's too simplistic to be helpful. It's such a small percentage of men, and as Cressida Dick said this week, this sort of crime is (thankfully) incredibly rare. To call it a 'male' problem is to position it in the gender/culture war that we've seen already this week. Binary explanations and solutions that don't dig deep enough and just wind everyone up.

If you compare male violence over time and across different cultures it's a start to better understanding. Also, statistically, men are far more likely to attack other men. It's also to do with what's happened to our public spaces - where everyone feels less safe. It's to do with the relationship between men and women; changing social and economic patterns etc. It's to say the least a multi-factoral subject...   

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 68
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The problem with all this type of campaigning based on single high profile cases is that it overlooks the blindingly obvious. It’s not the sex, disability, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity or religi

Men are not the problem. Abusers, rapists and those that sexually harass are the problem. The fact that the majority of these are men, does not make men the problem per se. If that were true, all men

Posted Images

Don't think your right there SMUJ. It's not just the incredibly rare abductions it is general harassment which creates an environment where women are fearful. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another contribution to the outpouring of emotions will be the recent publicity over the alleged treatment of Meghan Markel by some members of the royal family.

It is about power and the problem exists in wider circles than what we normally see. 

Another big element is that the person charged is assigned to protect people, not harm them. The incongruity of that is hard to make sense of.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Certain areas in big cities and towns can be dangerous for everyone after dark. How many men would even feel comfortable walking through certain areas of Douglas late at night ? London after dark, like every big city in the world, is an anonymous place, with high crime rates, drugs, alcohol, homelessness, prostitution, etc - and people look the other way. There are less police on the streets and woe betide the stranger who tries to help or act the good citizen. Most people keep their head down and head for the tube and home.

The centre of New York was largely cleaned up in the '90s by more active policing and a supportive mayor. I've not been there for a while but the streets of Manhattan felt much safer last time I was there. They didn't ban men off the streets - unless I missed something.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

And if, you can de-normalise some of the behaviour that doesn't help the situation, that's even better. Mate in the pub makes a comment that's a bit off? Point it out. Nobody is asking you to start going knocking heads together, just, sometimes a little thought goes a long way. And I'm sure everyone has said things that on reflection are a bit off-colour.

I think it detracts from the real point, the type of ‘man’ (coward) that attacks random women at night isn’t always the sleazy/creepy stereotype who talks derogatory about women down the pub and the follows a drunk female on her way home. Its normally the complete opposite. The type that befriends them, acts all nice/caring, portrays himself as some sort of family man, ie the type you think you can trust.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

What makes you think it's bollocks?

My view is, men are generally fortunate in that they don't have to worry about harassment, or their safety nearly as much.

And if, you can de-normalise some of the behaviour that doesn't help the situation, that's even better. Mate in the pub makes a comment that's a bit off? Point it out. Nobody is asking you to start going knocking heads together, just, sometimes a little thought goes a long way. And I'm sure everyone has said things that on reflection are a bit off-colour.

The more that happens, the more the gradual societal change takes place.

 

 

What do mean about a mate making a comment that's a "bit off"? Are you suggesting lads shouldn't stand in the pub on a night out mention to their mate that a girl is "bang tidy " (or whatever)?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've wondered why this topic hadn't been picked up on here.

There are a number of interesting aspects to this, mostly the debate that it has stimulated. 

There was something I saw the other day and it was headed something like "Men, How To Protect Yourself from Raping" and I think that was before the police officer was arrested.  It put forward an interesting perspective, the point not being that women should not be in risky situations, but that men shouldn't create them. I'll try and find it.

Found it, Sarah Silverton 

https://theminaretonline.com/2016/04/06/silvermans-ten-rape-prevention-tips-are-not-sexist/amp/

Edited by Gladys
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, John Wright said:

Peter Layman, from a white male, misogynist,   position of power not only blames the victim but thinks  she speaks from beyond the grave.

Unforgivable error on my part.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Peter Layman said:

Unforgivable error on my part.

Certainly crass and  cringeworthy  - but not  “unforgivable”

We all make errors..

- We don’t all have the strength of character to be able to admit  to our errors.

 

 

 

 

Edited by hampsterkahn
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure a lot of this is obviously caused by the physiological differences between men and women, how long before there are calls for testosterone limitation to bring the sexes closer together? Testosterone passports to be allowed out after 6pm?

ETA:

The way the peaceful vigil by women on Clapham Common was broken up last night by the police seems to speak volumes about the type of person they are recruiting these days. From the light touch and kneeling at the BLM protests of last year, where they would surely have got a pasting otherwise, to bullying women standing in silent vigil. Some men are the problem, a lot of them are in the police force by the look of things!  

Edited by Max Power
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Max Power said:

how long before there are calls for testosterone limitation to bring the sexes closer together? Testosterone passports to be allowed out after 6pm?

Literally never.

 

2 hours ago, Max Power said:

From the light touch and kneeling at the BLM protests of last year

We must've watched different protests!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...