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42 minutes ago, John Wright said:

Strange, if someone has been sectioned and then is discharged into care the Treasury pick up the tab without means testing. It’s called s115 care.

They did whilst sectioned which was around 8 weeks in total, they were even entitled to legal aid to appeal the decision, obviously having dementia they didn’t have a clue what was happening and that was just their ‘normal’, so they couldn’t understand why they weren’t allowed home. Plenty of ‘best interest’ meetings followed, I can’t remember the exact terminology used, I’ve tried my best to forget it because it was hellish, but it was something along the lines of ‘Fails to recognise their own level of needs’

 

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10 minutes ago, Annoymouse said:

They did whilst sectioned which was around 8 weeks in total, they were even entitled to legal aid to appeal the decision, obviously having dementia they didn’t have a clue what was happening and that was just their ‘normal’, so they couldn’t understand why they weren’t allowed home. Plenty of ‘best interest’ meetings followed, I can’t remember the exact terminology used, I’ve tried my best to forget it because it was hellish, but it was something along the lines of ‘Fails to recognise their own level of needs’

 

S.115 extends after the section is lifted

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4 minutes ago, John Wright said:

S.115 extends after the section is lifted

There were other family members poking their nose in and trying to call the shots, it was all a bit of a car crash to be honest, I do know the A.G office was involved and power of attorney etc was trying to be sought, either way the money disappeared and they were completely oblivious (thankfully).

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6 hours ago, jaymann said:

I think if you compare to the cost of a hotel, permanent 24/7 care and three meals its not a bad price. Its also pretty cheap compared to many homes across.

Yes care is expensive but if you look at it in context, it really isn't.

No, it isn't pretty cheap compared to many homes across. The average cost of a residential care home place in the UK is £34k a year. For residential nursing care its £46k. This is a lot more expensive. The Manx government system has the resident meet the full cost of their care until their resources fall to £13k, then the Government will make an care allowance payment of up to a maximum of £37k. The resident has to make up the shortfall until the last of their money is gone. After that, the private care home either takes on the resident for whatever the Government will pay or they move to a Government home, if they can get a place. It's also a bit of a myth that local indigents and ne'er to wells live in this sort of private nursing home at the Governments expense. They won't get in in the first place. They'll end up in a Government home.

All of these costs are far too high. I've never understood why being sick with dementia is any different from being sick with cancer, where you'd be looked after in hospital and none of us would mind paying for it with our taxes.

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On 3/20/2021 at 2:52 PM, Roxanne said:

Bring granny/grandad home. Even paying for additional help would leave plenty left over at these prices. I looked after both parents at home at the end of their lives. It gave us, as a family far more than it took away. It’s such a shame that we’ve moved so far from how it once was and I do wish we could back to how it once was with grandparents still having an active roll in their own families rather than being institutionalised at great financial and emotional cost.  

I agree in principle, but in practice that can be very difficult, especially if granny/grandad has dementia and the adult children both work full time and have young children of their own to look after, as was the case with us.  My mum's dementia had probably been deteriorating for several years, unnoticed by the rest of us because my dad was taking care of her and keeping the lid on it.  When he died, her dementia was unmasked (that's very often the case), she started wandering the streets at night looking for him, she couldn't remember how to turn the oven on and off, she became increasing demanding of daily shopping trips and car rides which we couldn't provide because we were both working full time (a weekly shopping delivery by Tesco just wasn't acceptable to her), and in the end we had no choice but to put her in a care home.  She didn't like it at first but soon got used to it, it is burning through ours and the grandchildren's inheritances at a fantastic rate but we didn't really have any other workable option. 

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I feel for you. Of course, with dementia it's a whole different scenario. My mum didn't have dementia but she has three strokes in quick succession that left her with a whole new personality and it was tough going to work not knowing what might be going on when I wasn't there. A lot fell to my son who was first home after school to make sure she was safe, settled and fed (through a peg feed). It was a big ask for a teenage boy but we all muddled through.  `It would be a brave family to take on a parent with dementia and have responsibility for their full time care and of course I can see the need for full time places for people who need specialised care.

That aside, there are a lot (an awful lot) of elderly relatives who are in care homes who could quite easily live with their families.  We've just moved away from the culture of care to the culture of giving huge sums of money to someone else to keep an eye on their elderly relatives. As with everything, it's all about money and little to do with public health. Other countries manage it fine and in many European countries, granny or grandad live with their families or close by.  The elderly are treated as something quite special, even after death their lives are celebrated far more than we do on these shores.

Putting the elderly in institutions has become the norm in the British Isles, we don't think there is anything wrong with it and we've lost touch with the valuable input they can have in our lives,, for us and for our children.

It's all about making money, and with it being so normalised, there are no shortage of customers. It's sad all round - unless you're the ones making the money - they don't seem to mind so much.

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