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On 4/28/2021 at 1:17 PM, AcousticallyChallenged said:

I'd highly recommend a CTEK or similar battery maintainer, Bentley actually include branded CTEK chargers. You can get a cable that will attach to the battery terminals, and can just be tucked in at the front grille to keep the battery topped up occasionally, so no fiddling about under the bonnet either.

I bought a CTEK MXS-5 which is entry level. I particularly liked the way the battery connectors had a dirt cover over the terminals so you could safely leave it in situ without worrying about them getting gunged up or wet causing a short. I needed it because a totally flat battery, like from a classic VW T2 Early Bay Camper, would not be seen by a standard charger so you would have to charge it in parallel with another battery which would have to be removed pdq when the charger kicked in. A pain.

The first step with battery problems is to disconnect the earth. You then put a multimeter on the battery post and ground the other probe. This will show how much current leakage, if any, there is. If it seems excessive then its a matter of removing fuses until it drops off thus indicating which circuit has the grounding problem. Good luck with that one!

Mind you, the dreaded Stop/Start technology has changed things. They need either an EFB (Enhanced Flooded Battery) or an AGM battery (Absorbent Glass Mat) battery. They both need a "smart" charger like the CTEK. They can give problems, like they did with mine.

Personally I always switch it off because folks think you've stalled it...

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That's a Nissan Navara's favourite trick even though Nissan have tried to bury the fact!

Exactly the same issues on a Previa and a Sharan ... my mechanic says its the climate over here.

You may find that just driving it won't pull it up above about 80%, a proper charger may be needed to top it right off. Though in my experience, I've seen that once a battery has gone properly fl

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24 minutes ago, P.K. said:

The first step with battery problems is to disconnect the earth. You then put a multimeter on the battery post and ground the other probe. This will show how much current leakage, if any, there is. If it seems excessive then its a matter of removing fuses until it drops off thus indicating which circuit has the grounding problem. Good luck with that one!

Mind you, the dreaded Stop/Start technology has changed things. They need either an EFB (Enhanced Flooded Battery) or an AGM battery (Absorbent Glass Mat) battery. They both need a "smart" charger like the CTEK. They can give problems, like they did with mine.

Personally I always switch it off because folks think you've stalled it...

It gets more complicated, most modern vehicles will draw quite a lot of current compared to their 'sleep mode', for about 15 minutes or so after ignition is turned off. Same when you first unlock it or open a door, the body computer(s) all start doing their thing. You'll also notice modern cars turning off interior lights after a number of minutes if they're left on and so on.

Some, like BMWs, will allow you to force them to go into the low power state, but that requires diagnostic gizmos.

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On 4/28/2021 at 5:19 PM, cheesypeas said:

.....battery tested. 67%. Time for a new one . 

did a new battery cure the situation ?

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1 hour ago, WTF said:

did a new battery cure the situation ?

It did thanks. Even the stop / start came back (not that I use it). Guess the question is how long before the problem comes back ?

 

....oh, and I had the DPF filter ‘ regenerated’. Might end up getting it cut out though. 

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21 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

It gets more complicated, most modern vehicles will draw quite a lot of current compared to their 'sleep mode', for about 15 minutes or so after ignition is turned off. Same when you first unlock it or open a door, the body computer(s) all start doing their thing. You'll also notice modern cars turning off interior lights after a number of minutes if they're left on and so on.

Some, like BMWs, will allow you to force them to go into the low power state, but that requires diagnostic gizmos.

An absolute favourite is leaving the ignition key in after switching off. I remember we once sold a car to a guy who was raging that his battery would go flat overnight and after us having checked the car out several times, insisted he was not leaving the key in the car. An early morning surprise visit to his house proved otherwise, full of apologies but we never got recompense for the hours spent and the heartache and threats made!  

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Most people I know who had a Range Rover/Land Rover have had problems with the batteries, still usually within the 3 year guarantee period.  I think it's a systematic issue with these cars.

As for DPF problems - it's the reason I'll never drive diesel again.

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5 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

I think folk have trouble with LR/ Freelander/ Disco etc. anyway, quite apart from the battery.

Indeed, a flat battery is the least of your problems if you own an L/R product!

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There are no 'Land Rovers' after the defender and the MK1 range rover, maybe the MK1 Defender. There are only vehicles made by the new LR corporation.

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7 hours ago, wrighty said:

Most people I know who had a Range Rover/Land Rover have had problems with the batteries, still usually within the 3 year guarantee period.  I think it's a systematic issue with these cars.

As for DPF problems - it's the reason I'll never drive diesel again.

I’ve driven diesels for 30+ years. Never had particulate filter issues. But then I do enough long fast drives across and in Europe to force regenerations as I go.

The Dacia that I had to have transported back from Bulgaria to Spain developed a DPF warning. A motorway run didn’t get rid. Local garage advised all ok. They re set the warning, which you can’t do yourself.

Not had real problems with LR. 20+ years of Discoveries, an Evoque and a current Discovery Sport. Yes, battery going flat, I’ve installed battery isolators in all cars, and the evoque fuel filler was subject to a recall.

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I think the point I was trying to make is Land Rovers are working vehicle whereas modern vehicles made by LR co are luxury vehicles not what I would class as working vehicles.

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9 hours ago, wrighty said:

Most people I know who had a Range Rover/Land Rover have had problems with the batteries, still usually within the 3 year guarantee period.  I think it's a systematic issue with these cars.

As for DPF problems - it's the reason I'll never drive diesel again.

Loads of diesels over the years (20 plus) and very few have ever been off island.

The only one I ever had a DPF issue with was the only automatic and my wife drove it (slowly) on short runs.

The manuals have all been trouble free.

 

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5 minutes ago, trmpton said:

The only one I ever had a DPF issue with was the only automatic and my wife drove it (slowly) on short runs

A re-map and a DPF delete is the solution. Over lockdown I believe lower use of diesels has generated a lot of money for garages at around £350 to £400 for a DPF re-charge. 

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17 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

I think the point I was trying to make is Land Rovers are working vehicle whereas modern vehicles made by LR co are luxury vehicles not what I would class as working vehicles.

Spent a lot of time out in the wilds of various countries with a lot of types of 4x4. 

If we ignore the new LR luxury vehicles, the general consensus I've discovered is that LRs will more than likely breakdown, but will be pretty easy and cheap to fix. 

Japanese (Land Cruisers / Hilux etc) will very rarely breakdown, but when they do, it's usually a nightmare. 

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