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Japanese Knotweed


Amadeus
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12 hours ago, John Wright said:

It very rarely seeds in the UK. Even if it does they don’t produce plants, think daffodils, tulips, crocuses, etc.

They only reproduce by seed with intensive horticultural intervention.

So, no, I’m not being pedantic.

You questioned how you could sue as you wouldn’t know where it came from. That’s just not true.

My extensive research (google) confirms to me that, yes, physical spread of the dam thing is the primary way it gets onto your land. However, whilst it seems infestation by seed is unlikely, infestation by other means is far from impossible. I had an embankment at the bottom of my garden and it started from nowhere. It ran rampant and spread into some common ground and my neighbour's land. 

@Trickyis correct. I treated it twice a year with a dose of roundup. Eventually I managed to eradicate it. I had to do the neighbours and the common land. 

WRT sueing, you are correct that if you could demonstrate that your neighbour had failed to take reasonable steps to control it and it ended up costing you you could sue them, however my observation was that you cannot transfer an enforcement nor a prosecution. Once you have it, responsibility becomes yours.

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5 minutes ago, GD4ELI said:

Not all rhododendrons though, just those growing wild on the rock and in Wales (Rhododendron ponticum). Also Rhododendron ponticum attracts the bees away from other plants I think. Cornwall council paid a local large garden to remove these bad ones.

They absolutely do not belong in the wilds of Scotland - where they are thriving.

The best walk in the British Isles is thought to be along the southern bank of Loch Hourn from Kinloch Hourn to Barrisdale Bay.

I would agree with that apart from the bloody Rhododendrons along the route. They look just so out of place. Totally alien compared to the surroundings.

There are also loads of them around The Old Forge which is the British mainland's remotest pub. How did they get there...?

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7 minutes ago, Happier diner said:

My extensive research (google) confirms to me that, yes, physical spread of the dam thing is the primary way it gets onto your land. However, whilst it seems infestation by seed is unlikely, infestation by other means is far from impossible. I had an embankment at the bottom of my garden and it started from nowhere. It ran rampant and spread into some common ground and my neighbour's land. 

@Trickyis correct. I treated it twice a year with a dose of roundup. Eventually I managed to eradicate it. I had to do the neighbours and the common land. 

WRT sueing, you are correct that if you could demonstrate that your neighbour had failed to take reasonable steps to control it and it ended up costing you you could sue them, however my observation was that you cannot transfer an enforcement nor a prosecution. Once you have it, responsibility becomes yours.

In Glen Auldyn JK came down the river, so someone either planted JK further upstream in Victorian times when it was popular or it may have come in compost.

A worry here is the previous local farmer could have moved it around the fields with his tractor, sadly he died a few years ago and his brother who has taken over is much more clued up.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, P.K. said:

They absolutely do not belong in the wilds of Scotland - where they are thriving.

The best walk in the British Isles is thought to be along the southern bank of Loch Hourn from Kinloch Hourn to Barrisdale Bay.

I would agree with that apart from the bloody Rhododendrons along the route. They look just so out of place. Totally alien compared to the surroundings.

There are also loads of them around The Old Forge which is the British mainland's remotest pub. How did they get there...?

Planted in the forests. Back to Glen Auldyn - they self seeded onto Sky Hill from plants in gardens, my mother had this variety as did many people as it was so easy to grow.

Aside: down here with the specialised gardens we have the oldest examples in the country, absolutely staggering.

 

ETA: After some thinking, the old forestry board may have actually planted some Rhododendrons 'cos they looked nice, this would have been 40+ years ago.

Edited by GD4ELI
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59 minutes ago, Happier diner said:

My extensive research (google) confirms to me that, yes, physical spread of the dam thing is the primary way it gets onto your land. However, whilst it seems infestation by seed is unlikely, infestation by other means is far from impossible. I had an embankment at the bottom of my garden and it started from nowhere. It ran rampant and spread into some common ground and my neighbour's land. 

@Trickyis correct. I treated it twice a year with a dose of roundup. Eventually I managed to eradicate it. I had to do the neighbours and the common land. 

WRT sueing, you are correct that if you could demonstrate that your neighbour had failed to take reasonable steps to control it and it ended up costing you you could sue them, however my observation was that you cannot transfer an enforcement nor a prosecution. Once you have it, responsibility becomes yours.

You really are not understanding the law. 

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1 hour ago, John Wright said:

You really are not understanding the law. 

Oh yes I am. I think we are at crossed purposes and there is no disagreement . I have been on the wrong side of the law on this one a few times and had various enforcements to deal with, enough to know how it works that's for sure! 

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On 5/6/2021 at 7:46 AM, GD4ELI said:

After some thinking, the old forestry board may have actually planted some Rhododendrons 'cos they looked nice, this would have been 40+ years ago.

Was it not the Victorians who planted them in the national glens? For decorative purposes?

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6 minutes ago, Capt_Mainwaring said:

Was it not the Victorians who planted them in the national glens? For decorative purposes?

Very probably.

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Yes.

Regularly,  at least once a week, usually daily, pulling any shoots. As with all plants it can only survive by photosynthesis. Took a couple of persistent years pulling.

I do need to keep an eye on things though as there is lots on unmanaged land just outside my garden. It will always come back from there.

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Posted (edited)

That’s about the only way to do it. With the rhizomes going 3 metres down and 7 metres across and with it only needing 1mm of rhizome to make a new plant, digging it through is pretty pointless. Even the strongest weed killer won’t go far enough down to kill it. If it’s rampant, then use a blowtorch to take it down the ground level and then after that, as @NoTailsays, regularly pinching it all out is the only way. It grows 10 cm a day so you’ve got to be diligent. (and determined!)

Edited by Roxanne
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I concur with all of the above, my experience:

Year 1  - Major Glysophate spraying session in autumn on a very large and established outbreak whilst they were in flower.

Year 2 - Almost daily checking for new growth in the evening - spraying each one as I go (mark each with a stick, and you will see a pattern of underground root growth)

Year 3  - I noticed a significant reduction in new growth, but kept on with the same routine.

Currently on Year 4 - Just been out, approx. 20 new sprouts over the past few months, so I am guessing that next year it will be pretty much gone. I was told that it needed five years of diligence. Fortunately I use it as part of my dog walk.

Never try to remove it manually, just grind it down, it will run out of energy eventually.

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