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42 minutes ago, Duncan Livingstone for Ayr said:

I have kept my Manifesto brief to try and engage all generations. I am using this page to expand on the ideas I am considering. Please use your vote!

My manifesto topic today is housing. This is probably the biggest issue that all candidates are hearing about on the doorstep and it's actually a personal one for me as I have three sons who at the moment have no real likelihood of aspiring to their own homes on the Island.

I am optimistic that the new administration will tackle this as all potential MHK’s are being pressed on it and recognising that it has to be sorted. It's a complex issue and I don't have the answers yet but if I'm elected these are some of my ideas for fixing our housing crisis.

I believe a healthy housing market will be a 'mixed economy'  providing affordable houses to buy, an affordable private rental sector as well as social housing for those in need. We can't carry on building on greenfield sites without knowing what local people need. The results of the recent census should give us some of this information.

Anecdotally, it seems that houses are being snapped up by off-island property management companies and then posted as rentals. If this is true it has to be stopped. There is a place for some buy to let and for holiday rentals but I would suggest it's best delivered by local landlords with an interest in our quality of life - not faceless corporations. My initial thought is that some kind of Residency Act is needed - not as a way of keeping out people who genuinely want to live here and contribute to the island but to protect the market from exploitation by developers.

I have no idea how much (if any) new development we need but I'd like to see proper analysis of how many empty properties there are and how they might be brought back into use. I'd also like to investigate how much brownfield development is possible and whether there's any potential to convert commercial buildings into residential. In other words, greenfield building can't be the whole solution. And we need transparency - it certainly feels as if the system is unfair to the little people.

We clearly need to do more for first time buyers - first thoughts on this are contracting the building of first time buyers properties, insisting that new developments have a good proportion of properties reserved for shared ownership and perhaps very cheap finance for young tradespeople who are willing to renovate and move into old properties which otherwise might not get a mortgage.

Finally - social housing. We have a hidden problem with people who aren't exactly homeless but whose housing situation is precarious. Some are 'sofa surfers', others in overcrowded accommodation on sufferance with relatives and some may be at risk of losing their homes because COVID has hit them financially. I don't know how big this problem is and I don't have the solution but I want to work with the people who do know (primarily charities and local authorities).

I'm no expert on any of this so I'm throwing my thoughts out there.  

Thanks for taking the time to read.
Duncan

Stopping a certain developer from selling most of their stock to BTL landlords before they're even built would be a start!

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1 hour ago, Duncan Livingstone for Ayr said:

I have kept my Manifesto brief to try and engage all generations. I am using this page to expand on the ideas I am considering. Please use your vote!

My manifesto topic today is housing. This is probably the biggest issue that all candidates are hearing about on the doorstep and it's actually a personal one for me as I have three sons who at the moment have no real likelihood of aspiring to their own homes on the Island.

I am optimistic that the new administration will tackle this as all potential MHK’s are being pressed on it and recognising that it has to be sorted. It's a complex issue and I don't have the answers yet but if I'm elected these are some of my ideas for fixing our housing crisis.

I believe a healthy housing market will be a 'mixed economy'  providing affordable houses to buy, an affordable private rental sector as well as social housing for those in need. We can't carry on building on greenfield sites without knowing what local people need. The results of the recent census should give us some of this information.

Anecdotally, it seems that houses are being snapped up by off-island property management companies and then posted as rentals. If this is true it has to be stopped. There is a place for some buy to let and for holiday rentals but I would suggest it's best delivered by local landlords with an interest in our quality of life - not faceless corporations. My initial thought is that some kind of Residency Act is needed - not as a way of keeping out people who genuinely want to live here and contribute to the island but to protect the market from exploitation by developers.

I have no idea how much (if any) new development we need but I'd like to see proper analysis of how many empty properties there are and how they might be brought back into use. I'd also like to investigate how much brownfield development is possible and whether there's any potential to convert commercial buildings into residential. In other words, greenfield building can't be the whole solution. And we need transparency - it certainly feels as if the system is unfair to the little people.

We clearly need to do more for first time buyers - first thoughts on this are contracting the building of first time buyers properties, insisting that new developments have a good proportion of properties reserved for shared ownership and perhaps very cheap finance for young tradespeople who are willing to renovate and move into old properties which otherwise might not get a mortgage.

Finally - social housing. We have a hidden problem with people who aren't exactly homeless but whose housing situation is precarious. Some are 'sofa surfers', others in overcrowded accommodation on sufferance with relatives and some may be at risk of losing their homes because COVID has hit them financially. I don't know how big this problem is and I don't have the solution but I want to work with the people who do know (primarily charities and local authorities).

I'm no expert on any of this so I'm throwing my thoughts out there.  

Thanks for taking the time to read.
Duncan

Thanks for taking the time to post.

Well Duncan, your heart's obviously in the right place, you sound earnest and enthusiastic, highlighting some of the main issues outstanding quite well.

I could pass the same compliment to all the prospective candidates as their manifestos basically push the same predictable narrative, but in their own way. Commonly platitudinal throughout them all.

Manx people want to see change, real change. They need to be represented by people with a will to modernise and facilitate necessary change, unafraid to speak out without fear or favour, not the undemocratic and conservative collective as we've had up to now, that moves along agonisingly at snails-pace.

There are a few hopeful's already in there, and the more Women in the mix the better.

 

Best of luck, anyway... 

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On 9/8/2021 at 10:50 PM, Duncan Livingstone for Ayr said:

I have kept my Manifesto brief to try and engage all generations. I am using this page to expand on the ideas I am considering. Please use your vote!

My manifesto topic today is housing. This is probably the biggest issue that all candidates are hearing about on the doorstep and it's actually a personal one for me as I have three sons who at the moment have no real likelihood of aspiring to their own homes on the Island.

I am optimistic that the new administration will tackle this as all potential MHK’s are being pressed on it and recognising that it has to be sorted. It's a complex issue and I don't have the answers yet but if I'm elected these are some of my ideas for fixing our housing crisis.

I believe a healthy housing market will be a 'mixed economy'  providing affordable houses to buy, an affordable private rental sector as well as social housing for those in need. We can't carry on building on greenfield sites without knowing what local people need. The results of the recent census should give us some of this information.

Anecdotally, it seems that houses are being snapped up by off-island property management companies and then posted as rentals. If this is true it has to be stopped. There is a place for some buy to let and for holiday rentals but I would suggest it's best delivered by local landlords with an interest in our quality of life - not faceless corporations. My initial thought is that some kind of Residency Act is needed - not as a way of keeping out people who genuinely want to live here and contribute to the island but to protect the market from exploitation by developers.

I have no idea how much (if any) new development we need but I'd like to see proper analysis of how many empty properties there are and how they might be brought back into use. I'd also like to investigate how much brownfield development is possible and whether there's any potential to convert commercial buildings into residential. In other words, greenfield building can't be the whole solution. And we need transparency - it certainly feels as if the system is unfair to the little people.

We clearly need to do more for first time buyers - first thoughts on this are contracting the building of first time buyers properties, insisting that new developments have a good proportion of properties reserved for shared ownership and perhaps very cheap finance for young tradespeople who are willing to renovate and move into old properties which otherwise might not get a mortgage.

Finally - social housing. We have a hidden problem with people who aren't exactly homeless but whose housing situation is precarious. Some are 'sofa surfers', others in overcrowded accommodation on sufferance with relatives and some may be at risk of losing their homes because COVID has hit them financially. I don't know how big this problem is and I don't have the solution but I want to work with the people who do know (primarily charities and local authorities).

I'm no expert on any of this so I'm throwing my thoughts out there.  

Thanks for taking the time to read.
Duncan

"I have no idea"

"I don't have the answers"

"I don't know"

"I'm no expert"

Not exactly installing confidence with words like this, i suppose you are being honest but unfortunatley we need people with an idea, answers and who are experts.

 

 

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1 hour ago, GringoQ said:

"I have no idea"

"I don't have the answers"

"I don't know"

"I'm no expert"

Not exactly installing confidence with words like this, i suppose you are being honest but unfortunatley we need people with an idea, answers and who are experts.

 

 

Completely agree with this. It’s all very well being enthusiastic but we don’t pay for these people to be, essentially, trained. I can appreciate that lots of people don’t have experience as an MHK but if you go for this role you should do your homework and know what you want to do and, if you were elected, where you would start to be able to reach your goal. We need people with expertise and knowledge in these roles. People need to be confident in their MHKs. 

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Today I'm going to talk about the elephant in the room! The war on drugs. The truth is the war is lost. If you look at Prohibition in America banning things does not work. It just makes bad guys rich (and more powerful), and the more vulnerable in society into victims.

 

It may surprise you to know that as an ex-policeman I am strongly in favour of decriminalising and regulating use of cannabis, medicinal and recreational. 

 

The reality is that we are not going to stop drug use but the present system of criminalising people for possession is not working. Many people use cannabis (as many of us use alchohol) with no harm done to society. Where it is a case of addiction it should be a welfare/mental health issue not a criminal matter.

 

I hate seeing the damage done to young people's lives by drugs. I hate the pushers who cause it and I want them to feel the full force of the law.

 

If we legalise and regulate cannabis we can ensure quality control and we can tax it so it is the island, not the dealers making the profit. At the moment, people end up in A&E having taken contaminated substances (anything from PCP to rat poison). And there are the drug 'mules' . A youngster smuggles drugs (say £5000) and gets caught. They go to prison. They do the time. They get released but in the eyes of the drug dealers they are £5000 in debt. How do they ever escape? We need to make trying to import drugs into the Island illegally not worth the effort.

 

We could also consider licensed cannabis premises and licensing cannabis growers here. Whilst it may not be comfortable for some, if the Island led in this field we could see a massive boost in tourism for people coming to a place where cannabis is legal and safe.

 

So, if I'm elected, my aim will be to work to decriminalise, regulate, invest police resources in catching the real bad guys (the dealers and importers), and massively boost welfare/mental health provision.

 

In relation to decriminalising this would have to be done with the approach of harm reduction, treatment, education and re-integration.

 

As a final comment, with thirty years Police service I have seen plenty of drug users. In my experience the average cannabis user is mostly a lot less aggressive than the average drunk. As one young person joked let’s make it 70,000 stoners clinging to a rock instead of 70,000 alcoholics! (Thanks MB! You asked for a tm!)

 

Thanks for reading. 

 

Make sure to use your vote.

 

Duncan.

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On 9/9/2021 at 12:38 AM, quilp said:

Manx people want to see change, real change. They need to be represented by people with a will to modernise and facilitate necessary change, unafraid to speak out without fear or favour, not the undemocratic and conservative collective as we've had up to now, that moves along agonisingly at snails-pace.

 

I am not convinced that the majority of people really want change. There is a large section of society that is doing very well out of the current situation, from private business contractors who pick up work from Govt, to Civil Servants, existing property owners and landlords to name a few. They may moan and whinge, but if truth were told they are happy for the train to run on and on. In addition to this there is also the saying that the true Manx do not like change, indeed they fear change.

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On 9/10/2021 at 11:29 PM, Duncan Livingstone for Ayr said:
If we legalise and regulate cannabis we can ensure quality control and we can tax it so it is the island, not the dealers making the profit. At the moment, people end up in A&E having taken contaminated substances (anything from PCP to rat poison).

Jesus, I dunno where you're getting your weed from, but I suggest you get a different dealer. 

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On 9/10/2021 at 12:40 PM, GringoQ said:

"I have no idea"

"I don't have the answers"

"I don't know"

"I'm no expert"

Not exactly installing confidence with words like this, i suppose you are being honest but unfortunatley we need people with an idea, answers and who are experts.

 

 

Unfortunately, that is what you get with elections of candidates who are independent. Well meaning people who are willing to give it a go. Without proper political parties standing on a comprehensive, well constructed and costed manifesto that is all you will ever get. What we get is a choice of mostly well-intentioned amateurs standing on very flimsy manifesto/wish lists and the electorate have to choose which one or two, based on this flimsy information, they like the look of best. It is no way to choose a government or even cast a vote effectively. If I had any intention of voting, the information I have seen to date would give me a fair idea of who I would not want to vote for, but not much of an idea of who I might want to vote for. It is just the usual guess or Hobson's choice. No way to run a democracy, if that is what it really is.

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