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Enid cancelled !!!


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10 hours ago, 2bees said:

I started reading The Secret Garden to one of my brood but I had to stop, it was of it's time, I remember I loved the story when my mum read it to me but when I was reading it it was very dated and there were words that have no place today. I don't think these books should be banned so much as put on a shelf, they have their place in history but they're not relevant today.

Wrong, they are as relevant not as they were then. Stop trying to eradicate history

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6 hours ago, Shake me up Judy said:

Amongst some black groups the 'n' word is an honorary badge of inclusion and respect that carries status.

Just watch the furore though if anybody other than a black person uses it

 

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19 minutes ago, Peter Layman said:

Just watch the furore though if anybody other than a black person uses it

The same word can have completely different meanings depending on who uses it. Because context is so significant.

In this case especially it's not just about whether a white or a black person uses the word. I doubt that many black people would use the word either.

Personally I would be almost as out of place and awkward calling someone "mate".

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I’m pretty certain the n word is in common and frequent use amongst and between certain sections of young black men on both sides of the Atlantic. It also has a non offensive everyday usage in Latin American Spanish. It’s a good example of cultural differential use/standards.

Its not a reappropriating of an offensive word however. Not like the LGBT reappropriation of the word queer to its original outsider/different/individual/challenging norms of gender/sexuality

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13 hours ago, pongo said:

We played killing Germans.

So did my grandfather. He was really rather good at it.

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7 hours ago, pongo said:

The same word can have completely different meanings depending on who uses it. Because context is so significant.

In this case especially it's not just about whether a white or a black person uses the word. I doubt that many black people would use the word either.

Personally I would be almost as out of place and awkward calling someone "mate".

Well if you don't have many mates that makes sense.:thumbsup:

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16 hours ago, Shake me up Judy said:

Nearly every schoolchild in the last forty years has at some point in their English syllabus read Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. One of the characters in that is black and the 'n' word is used more than once. It's a wonderful story that I've read many times yet I've never heard any call for it to be banned. What about other works of modern literature such as To Kill a Mockingbird or Huckleberry Finn ? Where should we draw the line ? 

 

There have been calls for Of Mice and Men to be banned for many reasons including racial language, vulgarity, condoning euthanasia and being anti-business. Those have largely been resisted because they're preposterous.

The reason the books you list use racial language is that a theme of those books is prejudice and the outcome is a sense of our common humanity. In discussing the books in class children learn about these things and hopefully conclude prejudice is bad. 

The same cannot be said for a book where a child refuses to play with a black doll, until it is scrubbed white. 

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3 hours ago, John Wright said:

I’m pretty certain the n word is in common and frequent use amongst and between certain sections of young black men on both sides of the Atlantic. It also has a non offensive everyday usage in Latin American Spanish. It’s a good example of cultural differential use/standards.

Its not a reappropriating of an offensive word however. Not like the LGBT reappropriation of the word queer to its original outsider/different/individual/challenging norms of gender/sexuality

Didn't a certain premier league footballer get into trouble using that word. Everyday phrase to him but still got him into trouble

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46 minutes ago, Peter Layman said:

Didn't a certain premier league footballer get into trouble using that word. Everyday phrase to him but still got him into trouble

There's been two issue Carvani recently replied on social media with the phrase to thank someone for complimenting him on a good game. Three game ban £100K fine. 

Suarez used when talking to Evra during a Liverpool vs United game. Eight game ban, £40K fine. 

I do have more sympathy with Carvani since there wasn't anything malicious in his use (ie his was the equivalent of  "thanks mate" whilst Suarez was more "wind your neck in mate" and spoken directly to a black man for whom Spanish isn't his first language by a noted wind-up merchant). But both had been playing in Europe a long time before these incidents so should have been culturally sensitive to the values in other countries and Carvani would undoubtedly be aware of Suarez incident. You'd hope now that every Uruguayan footballer moving to England was advised to drop the term from his vocabulary. 

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