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Enid cancelled !!!


Pipsqueak
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I don't think you've any idea what real racism is. I grew up in the 1960s and it was hardly Jim Crow, Nazi Germany or apartheid South Africa. There wasn't always much money but the kids I knew were mostly happy and free. We read comics and children's fiction without prejudice, and I don't recall any racism. Our dad's had fought a war against that sort of hatred. Some kids had golliwogs but they were dolls and no less loved for being black. There was an exoticism in older kids fiction that often introduced black characters but it was teaching us about different cultures and a wider world. You see it all as racist but it wasn't. Stop telling lies about the past and rewriting history. 

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34 minutes ago, Shake me up Judy said:

I don't think you've any idea what real racism is. I grew up in the 1960s.

I grew up in the 80's.  My grandparents fought in the wars but they acknowledged that not all German's were bad.

I know that you grew up in an era when signs saying "No Blacks, No Irish and No Dogs" were acceptable. 

I don't think that era is one to be held up as an example.  

Childrens books shouldn't cover race as topics.  That should be left until later when a sensible discourse can take place.

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56 minutes ago, Shake me up Judy said:

I don't think you've any idea what real racism is. I grew up in the 1960s and it was hardly Jim Crow, Nazi Germany or apartheid South Africa. There wasn't always much money but the kids I knew were mostly happy and free. We read comics and children's fiction without prejudice, and I don't recall any racism. Our dad's had fought a war against that sort of hatred. Some kids had golliwogs but they were dolls and no less loved for being black. There was an exoticism in older kids fiction that often introduced black characters but it was teaching us about different cultures and a wider world. You see it all as racist but it wasn't. Stop telling lies about the past and rewriting history. 

Nobody is re-writing history, don't be daft.

What has really changed is that English Heritage have added a caveat about her history.

Per English Heritage: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques/enid-blyton/

Quote

Blyton’s work has been criticised during her lifetime and after for its racism, xenophobia and lack of literary merit. A 1966 Guardian article noted the racism of The Little Black Doll (1966), in which the doll of the title, Sambo, is only accepted by his owner once his ‘ugly black face’ is washed ‘clean’ by rain. In 1960 the publisher Macmillan refused to publish her story The Mystery That Never Was for what it called its ‘faint but unattractive touch of old-fashioned xenophobia’. The book, however, was later published by William Collins.

Though, if your work isn't being published for xenophobic content in the 60s, that really says a lot.

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1 hour ago, manxman1980 said:

I grew up in the 80's.  My grandparents fought in the wars but they acknowledged that not all German's were bad.

I know that you grew up in an era when signs saying "No Blacks, No Irish and No Dogs" were acceptable. 

I don't think that era is one to be held up as an example.  

Childrens books shouldn't cover race as topics.  That should be left until later when a sensible discourse can take place.

What the fudd are you drinking?

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16 hours ago, TheTeapot said:

Is it still on the syllabus then? I read it as part of my GCSE English 20 years ago. 

Edit - it is indeed, so that's certainly not cancelled then 

https://schoolreadinglist.co.uk/tag/gcse/

The UK curriculum is really rather good! 
Someone said “Wrong” to my post about The Secret Garden, I wonder …when was the last time they read it? 

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There is less overt racism, and other isms or phobias, now, than there was in the past, but it’s not gone, it’s still there. And there’s more visible  casual low key isms. And it’s more visible for two reasons. 1. Society is more aware. 2. Marginalised and discriminated against groups are more willing to stand up and be counted.

The fact it’s casual, or low key, doesn’t make it any better. It does make it much more difficult to draw the line between what is acceptable and what isn’t.

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