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Charities and Volunteers take on Government services


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5 minutes ago, 2112 said:

At a risk of creating howls of protests, there are some charities on the Island that have created mini empires, and are run akin to a business, with the top hierarchy getting a salary. 

Six figure one's too!

 

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16 minutes ago, 2112 said:
 

From a personal perspective if I contribute a donation to a charity I want my donation to actually get to the people affected and supposedly requiring the charities assistance. I don’t want my donation to be eaten away paying salaries to professional in house fundraisers, and chief executives of said charities. Some are becoming appendages of Government, the funding coming from Government but paying for staff - creating mini empires. 

But unfortunately the sad fact is that without the professional in house fundraisers many charities would receive less net donations/ fundings even when allowing for the salaries of these people. 

Distasteful as it may first appear the charity wants to to maximize their income and to do so have to employ people who know how to get people to donate.

The average well meaning do-gooder ( and I don’t mean that in a derogatory way) however well intentioned would not know how to orchestrate a mass media marketing campaign to get people to stump up.

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1 minute ago, The Voice of Reason said:

But unfortunately the sad fact is that without the professional in house fundraisers many charities would receive less net donations/ fundings even when allowing for the salaries of these people. 

Distasteful as it may first appear the charity wants to to maximize their income and to do so have to employ people who know how to get people to donate.

The average well meaning do-gooder ( and I don’t mean that in a derogatory way) however well intentioned would not know how to orchestrate a mass media marketing campaign to get people to stump up.

You mean compulsory taxation that is then sent off to corrupt despot regime's dressed up as humanitarian aid?

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9 minutes ago, finlo said:

You mean compulsory taxation that is then sent off to corrupt despot regime's dressed up as humanitarian aid?

No that’s not what I meant at all.  Re-read my post. I am thinking more along the lines of Isle of Man Hospice etc


Dickhead
 

Edited by The Voice of Reason
To add “Dickhead”
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23 minutes ago, The Voice of Reason said:

No that’s not what I meant at all.  Re-read my post. I am thinking more along the lines of Isle of Man Hospice etc


Dickhead
 

Dickhead to you too! Howie/ Ashle lickspittle!

Actually your nasty streak has revealed you to be Tim Baker!

Edited by finlo
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43 minutes ago, The Voice of Reason said:

But unfortunately the sad fact is that without the professional in house fundraisers many charities would receive less net donations/ fundings even when allowing for the salaries of these people. 

Distasteful as it may first appear the charity wants to to maximize their income and to do so have to employ people who know how to get people to donate.

The average well meaning do-gooder ( and I don’t mean that in a derogatory way) however well intentioned would not know how to orchestrate a mass media marketing campaign to get people to stump up.

Actually, you make a very good point.  Charities have to use professional fundraisers to be effective. That costs. 

They also have to have good management to ensure the money raised is effectively used in the charitable objective and the charity is run properly and efficiently.  That costs too. 

Some of the larger charities handle huge amounts of money.  That cannot be left to well-intentioned but commercially/financially ignorant people. That costs.

In an ideal world, qualified people/companies would give their expertise and time for nowt.  But in the real world, they have a living to make, bear some exposure if stuff goes wrong and have to weigh competing demands. 

The days of charities being a bunch of well-intentioned people with a desire to solve a problem is over.  It is business, the only difference really is that there are no greedy shareholders pushing the risk envelope for profit. 

 

 

 

Edited by Gladys
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14 hours ago, Gladys said:

The issue is also which are 'good' charities and which are 'bad' and that is from a number of viewpoints. 

A 'good' charity may be perceived as one of those which meets a need that the government is either unable or unwilling to meet. 

The 'bad' charity may be one which campaigns for change, possibly legislative change, which becomes something of a thorn in the side and, quite importantly, uses its resources for that aim, rather than for funding directly measures against the very thing they are against.

It is quite an interesting area when you start to dissect it.  At what point does campaigning actually impair the delivery of alleviation, should a charity campaign and if a charity doesn't who else will? What is a charity's role?  Dealing with an acute need, or trying to address the more chronic, systemic failing that creates the need in the first place? 

Worthy of a thesis.  

Good post.

Can we also include the notions of  'good' and 'bad' government that, albeit unknowingly or unwillingly, creates the conditions for charities and volunteers to occupy. Is is a positive strategy to create a 'helpful' society (that thing Margaret Thatcher said did not exist any more).

I think all charities on the IoM should ( be made to) publish their balance sheets and salaries for all staff, admin costs etc so we know where our contributions / donations are going to, especially if the form any semblance of a contract or arrangement with government. about what or how they provide a service. I suspect there would be one or two surprises.

@2112please ignore the howls of protest, I would be interested to know who they are. 

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13 hours ago, Gladys said:

Actually, you make a very good point.  Charities have to use professional fundraisers to be effective. That costs. 

They also have to have good management to ensure the money raised is effectively used in the charitable objective and the charity is run properly and efficiently.  That costs too. 

Some of the larger charities handle huge amounts of money.  That cannot be left to well-intentioned but commercially/financially ignorant people. That costs.

In an ideal world, qualified people/companies would give their expertise and time for nowt.  But in the real world, they have a living to make, bear some exposure if stuff goes wrong and have to weigh competing demands. 

The days of charities being a bunch of well-intentioned people with a desire to solve a problem is over.  It is business, the only difference really is that there are no greedy shareholders pushing the risk envelope for profit. 

 

 

 


In an ideal world they shouldn't need to exist

The bigger ones are described by some nowadays as pension funds with charities attached

Really they are enterprises, & that's why the island needs to be a place of enterprise rather than just 'business' as the CoC would have it

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1 hour ago, SleepyJoe said:


In an ideal world they shouldn't need to exist

The bigger ones are described by some nowadays as pension funds with charities attached

Really they are enterprises, & that's why the island needs to be a place of enterprise rather than just 'business' as the CoC would have it

If we could ever achieve an ideal world, I would agree.  But even in an ideal world there will be a need for charities, they do more than alleviate poverty, they research, they educate,  they provide or hold amenities (think of Noble's legacy), hold significant collections, and so much more.  It is a huge and diverse sector. 

You are right, though, they are enterprises, and need to be recognised and run as such. 

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2 hours ago, Apple said:

Good post.

Can we also include the notions of  'good' and 'bad' government that, albeit unknowingly or unwillingly, creates the conditions for charities and volunteers to occupy. Is is a positive strategy to create a 'helpful' society (that thing Margaret Thatcher said did not exist any more).

I think all charities on the IoM should ( be made to) publish their balance sheets and salaries for all staff, admin costs etc so we know where our contributions / donations are going to, especially if the form any semblance of a contract or arrangement with government. about what or how they provide a service. I suspect there would be one or two surprises.

@2112please ignore the howls of protest, I would be interested to know who they are. 

If you make certain comments known on IOMNP Facebook page you run the risk of being shouted down or trolled. At worst you could be banned.

On here there are a couple of ‘contributors’ who like to cause trouble, troll and bully their views and opinions. However it is a very small minority. 

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Lovely article on IOMNP Facebook page about the Community Meals organisation setting up a stand in the car park at Port Erin Shoprite, and belong told by Management to seek permission from Head Office. 
 

Needless to say, lots of negative headlines and publicity for Shoprite. In the meantime the Manx Coop and Tesco have offered car parking facilities and permission etc. 
 

Would Shoprite have refused if they had a deal with Government for free food vouchers for poorer members of society?

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