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Covid Deniers and Anti Vaxxers


John Wright
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The simplest way to explain the difference between common law and staute law is (1) that common law is what the courts (ie judges) have said or decided the law is, (2) that staute law is law made or passed by Parliament - or whatever the appropriate legislative assembly is, and (3) if statute law conflicts with previous common law decisions, then statute law  takes priority and overrides the earlier common law.  It's this last bit (3) that freemen on the land ignore or completely fail to understand when they bang on about common law.

Generally, if someone either raises Magna Carta in support of their position or they tell you that staute law can't overturn common law, you know you are talking to someone who is way out of their depth and might well be heading for serious trouble with the law.

The legal systems of some countries don't have what we would recognise as common law, and the laws in those countries are basically all codified in what we might recognise as statutes.  Whether freemen on the land "eccentrics" exist in non-common law jurisdictions I don't know, but I suspect they can't as they'd have nothing to base their deluded arguments on.

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34 minutes ago, Ghost Ship said:

The legal systems of some countries don't have what we would recognise as common law, and the laws in those countries are basically all codified in what we might recognise as statutes.  Whether freemen on the land "eccentrics" exist in non-common law jurisdictions I don't know, but I suspect they can't as they'd have nothing to base their deluded arguments on.

Non-common law jurisdictions tend to have written constitutions which all other laws operate under and the equivalents in such countries, notably the US, base their delusions on their 'constitutional rights'.  Of course as far as they are concerned the constitution reads "You can do whatever you like and everyone one else has to do what you like as well".

To some extent the whole 'freeman of the land' nonsense (which has zero historical basis) is an attempt to mimic the US and  its relationship to its constitution.  So it's really the other way round with then making common law into a pseudo-constitution, which as you say is legal nonsense.

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3 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

Non-common law jurisdictions tend to have written constitutions which all other laws operate under and the equivalents in such countries, notably the US, base their delusions on their 'constitutional rights'...

But remember the US (like most of the rest of the english speaking world and some former British colonies - with possibly the usual exception of Scotland) is still a common law system - their constitution doesn't alter that. 

I don't know anything about the growth of FMOTL idiocy, but I suspect its roots lie in shysters making up get out of jail free cards to sell to gullible and vulnerable people (like in the Tame-elf thread) with a dash of conspiracy theory thrown in.  Lots of fertile ground for that sort of guff in the States whether they have a written constitution or not.

(I must say I didn't realise until I read John Wright's post that the island isn't a common law jurisdiction.  Perhaps somebody needs to quietly point that out to Courtney Heading - or whatever his name is... )

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1 hour ago, Ghost Ship said:

But remember the US (like most of the rest of the english speaking world and some former British colonies - with possibly the usual exception of Scotland) is still a common law system - their constitution doesn't alter that. 

I don't know anything about the growth of FMOTL idiocy, but I suspect its roots lie in shysters making up get out of jail free cards to sell to gullible and vulnerable people (like in the Tame-elf thread) with a dash of conspiracy theory thrown in.  Lots of fertile ground for that sort of guff in the States whether they have a written constitution or not.

(I must say I didn't realise until I read John Wright's post that the island isn't a common law jurisdiction.  Perhaps somebody needs to quietly point that out to Courtney Heading - or whatever his name is... )

Common law in the US is mainly restricted to individual States, the point is that the Constitution is supreme.  Though of course that Constitution is self-limited to what it can do in States there's definitely a hierarchy.  In the Island as elsewhere, statute law automatically over-rules common law.

Scotland very much does have common law in active use, much more so than England I suspect, with some of the offences with splendid Scots names such as Hamesucken or Latin ones such as Plagium.  I seem to remember John saying that Manx Common Law had been superseded (or rather consolidated into statute) in the 19th century, but I think there is still some civil common law around. 

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2 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

Common law in the US is mainly restricted to individual States, the point is that the Constitution is supreme.  Though of course that Constitution is self-limited to what it can do in States there's definitely a hierarchy.  In the Island as elsewhere, statute law automatically over-rules common law.

Scotland very much does have common law in active use, much more so than England I suspect, with some of the offences with splendid Scots names such as Hamesucken or Latin ones such as Plagium.  I seem to remember John saying that Manx Common Law had been superseded (or rather consolidated into statute) in the 19th century, but I think there is still some civil common law around. 

I think that’s a complete mischaracterisation, Roger, as far as the US is concerned.

The Constitution is born of common law, it’s a common law document, full of common law ideas and principles, and it’s interpreted and applied using common law methodology and procedure.

And the interplay between the US constitution and the constitutions of its constituent states is one of the biggest areas of common law growth.

Theres also an interesting interplay between that and the laws of states that don’t have a common law background.

Common law changes, but change is glacial. The constitution is a living thing. 

Much Scots non statute law is Roman Dutch inspired with its own common law over lay.

Its only Manx Criminal law that was codified. But even now common/breast law principles fill in some gaps.

And don’t forget civil law code napoleon legal systems have their own judge made law of interpretation, filling in the gaps, application of the code. This judge made law has a sort of common law effect.

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Just now, The Phantom said:

I was just about to post that. Another free man (woman) nutter. 

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19 minutes ago, The Phantom said:

The lack of consistency in these nutcases' arguments is comical. 

Hope she gets equal arms though, must be tricky riding horses with unequal arms. 

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26 minutes ago, The Phantom said:

A rather strange statement from Mrs Megson given the amount of time she has spent in the Manx Courts in recent decades.  Here's a recent appearance on Judgments where she is demanding that she has the right to appeal to the Privy Council against her landlord throwing her out because she hadn't paid the rent (there are another seven entries regarding this case alone).

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12 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

A rather strange statement from Mrs Megson given the amount of time she has spent in the Manx Courts in recent decades.  Here's a recent appearance on Judgments where she is demanding that she has the right to appeal to the Privy Council against her landlord throwing her out because she hadn't paid the rent (there are another seven entries regarding this case alone).

Wow, she is special. 

I am amazed how tolerant High Baliff seems to be.  Perhaps she actually finds it amusing?

I've found that people only really tend to get angry when they know they are arguing against the truth.  Would explain why the normals don't seem to get as wound up as these Anti-Vaxxer/Conspiracy theorists do when arguing the other way... 

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