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Douglas Sh@hole!


Max Power
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1 minute ago, Roxanne said:

They opened at lunch and closed at night.  That's when we went to the Villiers for a lock in or round the corner to 'Malcolm's for a steak and a bottle of Mateus Rose. :)

Malcolm!  I loved him with his recitations - Albert and his whatever with a horse's head handle. 

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8 minutes ago, Gladys said:

And at that time, not many pubs sold food. 

I remember when the British started selling food at lunchtime, around '83.  A comprehensive menu of ham sandwich (jokingly referred to as having had the ham photocopied on to the bread) and some chicken thing which was a couple  of slices of chicken with a ham and cheese filling.

"Young" Ted Drain, was a great landlord, but definitely not an innovator. 

 

Ted Drain was the best landlord the British ever had, sold more Okells bitter than any other pub on the Island, then H+B took him in on as an employer to advise them how to run their pubs

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2 minutes ago, alpha-acid said:

Ted Drain was the best landlord the British ever had, sold more Okells bitter than any other pub on the Island, then H+B took him in on as an employer to advise them how to run their pubs

Yes, the British had the best pint of Okells, apparently, although I was never a bitter drinker. But I always got the feeling that Ted Drain, although a good landlord, was not wedded to the occupation. 

"Old" Ted Drain was also a character I believe.  There were stories of the regulars helping him upstairs at the end of the evening by bracing their shoulders against his rear.

It was a good pub in those days. 

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3 hours ago, Augustus said:

To be fair, you're also a bit of a troll poster. You come on here to drip poison on Peters every time his name is mentioned. Haven't you got a hobby or maybe some friends to hang out with? Far healthier.

Nice one AuguSTUs, that Stu fella who is not you is a total shir bag but crack on you coward.

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24 minutes ago, HiVibes said:

Nice one AuguSTUs, that Stu fella who is not you is a total shir bag but crack on you coward.

How about tomorrow pop up project21 and meet some of your most vulnerable constituents who are all much more worthy of life than you.

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52 minutes ago, HiVibes said:

How about tomorrow pop up project21 and meet some of your most vulnerable constituents who are all much more worthy of life than you.

It greatly amuses me that you're talking to yourself, you think I get drunk before posting (booze is one thing I CAN do in moderation) and that Augustus is my pseudonym. It isn't. But you're right, I'm possibly a shir bag.

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15 hours ago, Stu Peters said:

It greatly amuses me that you're talking to yourself, you think I get drunk before posting (booze is one thing I CAN do in moderation) and that Augustus is my pseudonym. It isn't. But you're right, I'm possibly a shir bag.

Personal arguments between you two aside, do you think your "window licking" comment was OK, Stu ?

Have to say it just seemed horribly dated and horribly insensitive for someone who's supposed to represent (all of) the people.

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19 hours ago, Gladys said:

And at that time, not many pubs sold food. 

I remember when the British started selling food at lunchtime, around '83.  A comprehensive menu of ham sandwich (jokingly referred to as having had the ham photocopied on to the bread) and some chicken thing which was a couple  of slices of chicken with a ham and cheese filling.

"Young" Ted Drain, was a great landlord, but definitely not an innovator. 

 

Surely it was an innovation if the 'comprehensive menu' was enough to qualify for Sunday lunchtime drinking in the Winter?

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22 minutes ago, AOR said:

Surely it was an innovation if the 'comprehensive menu' was enough to qualify for Sunday lunchtime drinking in the Winter?

That was never the Licensing Act definition or test.

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21 hours ago, Gladys said:

Pubs were closed on a Sunday in winter up until, pretty sure,  the early 80s.  They may have been open at lunchtimes on winter Sundays, all year round, I think. 

But, yes, you are right there was definitely a view that the Lord's day was to be kept for locals when there were no visitors. 

No. Not on winter Sunday lunches.

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26 minutes ago, AOR said:

Surely it was an innovation if the 'comprehensive menu' was enough to qualify for Sunday lunchtime drinking in the Winter?

No  it wasn't offered at the weekend  just weekdays. 

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As I recall, weren't the pubs shut all day on sundays in the winter?  

I don't remember Sunday luchtime drinking to be a "thing" in the Isle of Man in the 1970s and I was surprised at its popularity in the UK when I went to university.

(I know I was really pissed off when I came home each Christmas that the pubs weren't open on Sunday evenings... )

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