Jump to content

IOM DHSC & MANX CARE


Cassie2
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Gladys said:

Where do they get the locums from?  Is there any check?  Not going to go into detail, but a consultant let my family down  very badly. 

It was a straw that broke the camel's back, apparently. 

What that means more widely, is whether we carry out checks?  Or are we just grateful for any help, whether it is good or bad?

That is sad to hear about your family issue but recently has become a familiar lament. I know of two other similar type cases.

The question about checks on agency and locum medical and clinical staff from off island is an important one and probably would be better aired in HoK. The problem is though is that MHK's now are reluctant to raise problems about Manx Care because this costly transition project as it stands can not be seen to be found wanting. And yet it is. 

The style of Manx care's introduction, the communication problems, staff leaving, and a myriad of other mismanagement issues now has to be seriously reviewed. The mandate is too far off and the islands population needs better than what it is getting now. That pressure will only continue to grow. 

Technocrats bussed in from off island has not worked. We need a new and adult conversation about our health and care services and those at the top of Manx Care do not seem to be coping well at all. Staff I speak to are mostly nursing and medical are somewhat disillusioned about what is happening on the ground but cannot / dare not speak out.

The question needs to be asked - is it time for change of style and direction or continue to battle against some of the difficulties that patients and families are now experiencing? It is they who are paying the cost.

The Government has to step in I think now. Not to do so exposes their manifesto pledges too improve health services for the people of the Isle of Man as a step too far.

 

Edited by Apple
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Apple said:

That is sad to hear about your family issue but recently has become a familiar lament. I know of two other similar type cases.

The question about checks on agency and locum medical and clinical staff from off island is an important one and probably would be better aired in HoK. The problem is though is that MHK's now are reluctant to raise problems about Manx Care because this costly transition project as it stands can not be seen to be found wanting. And yet it is. 

The style of Manx care's introduction, the communication problems, staff leaving, and a myriad of other mismanagement issues now has to be seriously reviewed. The mandate is too far off and the islands population needs better than what it is getting now. That pressure will only continue to grow. 

Technocrats bussed in from off island has not worked. We need a new and adult conversation about our health and care services and those at the top of Manx Care do not seem to be coping well at all. Staff I speak to are mostly nursing and medical are somewhat disillusioned about what is happening on the ground but cannot / dare not speak out.

The question needs to be asked - is it time for change of style and direction or continue to battle against some of the difficulties that patients and families are now experiencing? It is they who are paying the cost.

The Government has to step in I think now. Not to do so exposes their manifesto pledges too improve health services for the people of the Isle of Man as a step too far.

 

Thanks Apple.  Rotten situation,  but it was actually dealt with quickly, sympathetically and with a real outcome rather than a quagmire of investigation.  For that, hats off to Manx Care. 

Edited by Gladys
Remove the grocer's apostrophe.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Gladys said:

Where do they get the locums from?  Is there any check?  Not going to go into detail, but a consultant let my family down  very badly. 

It can be very difficult to vet locums. I used to say that there’s only two reasons to be a locum - you’re a money grabbing ******, or no bloody good. 
 

We get their CVs and a bunch of references. References are not worth the paper they’re written on as nobody in their right mind would submit a bad one. Whenever I get asked to vet a locum I look at where they’ve worked and for how long. And make sure their age is commensurate with the seniority of position they’re applying for. If you’re in your 60s and applying for very junior doctor posts there’s something wrong. Call me ageist if you like - but I think I’m right. 
 

In some specialties the selection is fairly slim pickings. So what do we do? Appoint nobody and cancel services, or appoint anybody and deal with the consequences? It’s often a no-win situation, and in hindsight the decisions made can sometimes be obviously wrong. Not easy when you’re in the moment though. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, wrighty said:

It can be very difficult to vet locums. I used to say that there’s only two reasons to be a locum - you’re a money grabbing ******, or no bloody good. 

Or you like to move around, enjoy different parts of the country / world? You can also avoid a lot of politics.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, GD4ELI said:

Or you like to move around, enjoy different parts of the country / world? You can also avoid a lot of politics.

Few and far between, and mainly consist of docs who have retired early from a ‘standard’ medical career and are moving around keeping their hand in, or perhaps junior docs at the start of their career who don’t really know yet what they want to do. The other points I made about consistency of age and seniority of position, and assessing the CV to look for longer stints of continuous employment apply here too. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Gladys said:

For that, hats off to Manx Care. 

There are many dedicated and hard working people who have worked and still do work hard, often difficult circumstances ,to deliver the services we sometimes take for granted, usually until we need them ourselves or for our family.

Where are we at this moment in time though:-

Cancer waiting time targets being breached,

Reports of hospital being at full capacity and people advised not to attend  A and E for non urgent assessments

The Minister of DHSC on the media reporting on the need to use brown sites.

Someone, somewhere is fiddling whilst I can smell smoke..... 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, wrighty said:

The other points I made about consistency of age and seniority of position, and assessing the CV to look for longer stints of continuous employment apply here too. 

Except of course for management where a history of 18 month to three year posts seems mandatory and can be claimed as showing that they're a 'trouble-shooter' - rather than the trouble that was got shot of.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

Except of course for management where a history of 18 month to three year posts seems mandatory and can be claimed as showing that they're a 'trouble-shooter' - rather than the trouble that was got shot of.

Not that I want to start a turf war, but this is one of the causes of the ‘them and us’ situation that undoubtedly exists between hospital management and clinicians. 
 

When you appoint a nurse/doctor (to a substantive, permanent position) there are people on the panel specifically to ensure that the candidates are qualified for the role, such that you can be pretty sure when a consultant is appointed, he or she will be fully qualified, be on the specialist register, has undertaken higher specialist training etc. When a senior manager is appointed there are no such checks, because there are no such qualifications and no regulatory bodies to check with. This leads to stories, for example, of finance directors who used to serve the chips in the canteen.  And since medical careers are often far longer lasting, there can be current consultants who were in post when said finance director used to serve the chips. You can see why there might not be the mutual respect that there ought to be. 
 

I think the NHS are trying to address this through the leadership academy etc, but we still see managers appointed who have no qualifications besides their self-authored LinkedIn profile. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, wrighty said:

References are not worth the paper they’re written on 

Agreed - that’s why though sensible people do extra checks - a simple  telephone call can be very  illuminating.

Not so very long ago, a senior doctor was appointed here in the IoM.

Had even the most basic checks been made, let alone a CRB check ( it wasn’t for some reason ) it would have revealed that the appointee was a wanted criminal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, wrighty said:

Not that I want to start a turf war, but this is one of the causes of the ‘them and us’ situation that undoubtedly exists between hospital management and clinicians. 
 

When you appoint a nurse/doctor (to a substantive, permanent position) there are people on the panel specifically to ensure that the candidates are qualified for the role, such that you can be pretty sure when a consultant is appointed, he or she will be fully qualified, be on the specialist register, has undertaken higher specialist training etc. When a senior manager is appointed there are no such checks, because there are no such qualifications and no regulatory bodies to check with. This leads to stories, for example, of finance directors who used to serve the chips in the canteen.  And since medical careers are often far longer lasting, there can be current consultants who were in post when said finance director used to serve the chips. You can see why there might not be the mutual respect that there ought to be. 
 

I think the NHS are trying to address this through the leadership academy etc, but we still see managers appointed who have no qualifications besides their self-authored LinkedIn profile. 

It is easy to check registration with the GMC, its ‘specialist register, NMC, health and social care et al for qualifications, whether the position is substantive, bank or locum - its all free, anyone can do it. There are also lost of registers for ‘non-medical’ qualifications available publicly, or at a nominal fee, so if someone claims a certain qualification in a ‘management’ function there will, generally, be a register - checking, or relying on, claims of qualifications made on a social media profile is a recipe for disaster - if Manx Care is appointing people to posts, whether medical, non-medical, substantive or not, it should spend at least 30 minutes checking the qualifications cited. There is literally no excuse, especially as the purse needs protecting.

Perhaps I should think about setting up a service to do the checks for Manx Care…. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, hampsterkahn said:

Agreed - that’s why though sensible people do extra checks - a simple  telephone call can be very  illuminating.

Not so very long ago, a senior doctor was appointed here in the IoM.

Had even the most basic checks been made, let alone a CRB check ( it wasn’t for some reason ) it would have revealed that the appointee was a wanted criminal.

You’re referring to Dirk Hoehmann I assume. In this case I don’t think phonecalls would have helped much. He worked in Aintree before here, I believe, and was clinically soind, so off-radar phonecalls wouldn’t have raised any alarm bells. I think CRB checks were done, but didn’t cover his European time, so didn’t pick up the wanted criminal bit. 
 

Re my previous post. I should point out that the serving chips/finance director story relates to a UK hospital, not Noble’s. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, wrighty said:

You’re referring to Dirk Hoehmann I assume. In this case I don’t think phonecalls would have helped much. He worked in Aintree before here, I believe, and was clinically soind, so off-radar phonecalls wouldn’t have raised any alarm bells. I think CRB checks were done, but didn’t cover his European time, so didn’t pick up the wanted criminal bit. 
 

Re my previous post. I should point out that the serving chips/finance director story relates to a UK hospital, not Noble’s. 

Seems to be de rigueur for every other government department!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×
×
  • Create New...