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Carol Quine Chair of Castletown Commissioner's vote of no Confidence


Whatnonsence
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27 minutes ago, StrangeBrew said:

I’d be interested to hear the employee’s view as to whether they ‘volunteered’ to help administer ear drops to the chair of the commissioners’ dog. Given the Chair held a position of authority, perhaps the employee felt obliged and that they couldn’t say no?

 

Certainly sounds as though that's the case considering this part of the commissioners statement: 

It is a matter of disappointment the Board that after several weeks of silence, Miss Quine has through her public press release chosen to make misleading comments about an employee of the town that the Commissioners refute in their entirety.

I'd like to know why she couldn't administer the doggy eardrops herself. Sounds like she's incapable of looking after it. Eardrops certainly aren't brain surgery. 

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2 minutes ago, StrangeBrew said:

I ‘volunteered’, having been manipulated into doing so by someone who had the power to sack me, or at the very least make my working life more difficult. Sorry if that wasn’t clear. 

It was clear to me as I've been backed into that "volunteering" corner myself a time or twenty, not only by a boss but more often by family members. Don't allow it to happen now I'm a bit older, but it was a semi-frequent occurrence when I was younger and less self-assured. 

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Just now, Zarley said:

It was clear to me as I've been backed into that "volunteering" corner myself a time or twenty, not only by a boss but more often by family members. Don't allow it to happen now I'm a bit older, but it was a semi-frequent occurrence when I was younger and less self-assured. 

Yes - where there is a power balance, the person in the position of authority should take care not to abuse it. To be clear, I don’t know if that’s what happened here - very much just speculating, as it’s hard to make sense of what’s gone on.

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38 minutes ago, Zarley said:

I'd like to know why she couldn't administer the doggy eardrops herself. Sounds like she's incapable of looking after it. Eardrops certainly aren't brain surgery. 

I suspect Quine was the one who was supposed to be holding the animal still while the drops were administered.  Obviously she wasn't very successful as it managed to bite the employee.

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3 hours ago, Zarley said:

Certainly sounds as though that's the case considering this part of the commissioners statement: 

It is a matter of disappointment the Board that after several weeks of silence, Miss Quine has through her public press release chosen to make misleading comments about an employee of the town that the Commissioners refute in their entirety.

I'd like to know why she couldn't administer the doggy eardrops herself. Sounds like she's incapable of looking after it. Eardrops certainly aren't brain surgery. 

Really - comments like this are ridiculous...... it's not always that simple - try putting ear drops or give any medication to an animal that is in pain and doesn't want you anywhere near them/touching their sore bits  - on your own.

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2 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

I suspect Quine was the one who was supposed to be holding the animal still while the drops were administered.  Obviously she wasn't very successful as it managed to bite the employee.

Dogs wriggle, dogs move..... vets sometimes need 2 people to administer meds.... when a dog is in pain it doesn't understand that you are trying to help it.... this whole scenario is getting way overthought......

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4 minutes ago, daisy said:

Really - comments like this are ridiculous...... it's not always that simple - try putting ear drops or give any medication to an animal that is in pain and doesn't want you anywhere near them/touching their sore bits  - on your own.

I've given meds to unwilling animals on my own plenty of times. I've needed help once or twice as well, but I'd get a friend or family member who the animal knew to help. I'd never get an employee to do it. 

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5 minutes ago, Zarley said:

I've given meds to unwilling animals on my own plenty of times. I've needed help once or twice as well, but I'd get a friend or family member who the animal knew to help. I'd never get an employee to do it. 

 I've got a sick dog at the mo and it took 2 vets to give  her meds.... you dont know personal circs re availability of family. And the guy ..by own admission.. offered to help - under no duress. 

 

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18 minutes ago, daisy said:

 I've got a sick dog at the mo and it took 2 vets to give  her meds.... you dont know personal circs re availability of family. And the guy ..by own admission.. offered to help - under no duress. 

 

For goodness sake, the question has to be why an employee and why at the office?

I have had pets all my life, had to inject them, clean wounds, give medication, administer ear and eye drops,  give flea treatments etc. etc.  At no time did I think of roping in someone else to help, especially not someone from work. 

If it was too tricky, what would I do?  Go back to the vet and ask for help.

There are tricks that help, but if it is too stressful or impossible, then back to the vets.  I only once had a tricky situation and that was trying to manhandle a labrador from the back of a car after a cruciate ligament op. In the end, I got his back legs in a towel and help him out by taking the weight of his back legs in the towel and supporting his front legs.  I didn't get stressed as he would have picked that up and struggled. 

It really is about a. knowing how to handle an animal and b. not taking the piss by roping other people in. 

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11 minutes ago, Gladys said:

For goodness sake, the question has to be why an employee and why at the office?

I have had pets all my life, had to inject them, clean wounds, give medication, administer ear and eye drops,  give flea treatments etc. etc.  At no time did I think of roping in someone else to help, especially not someone from work. 

If it was too tricky, what would I do?  Go back to the vet and ask for help.

There are tricks that help, but if it is too stressful or impossible, then back to the vets.  I only once had a tricky situation and that was trying to manhandle a labrador from the back of a car after a cruciate ligament op. In the end, I got his back legs in a towel and help him out by taking the weight of his back legs in the towel and supporting his front legs.  I didn't get stressed as he would have picked that up and struggled. 

It really is about a. knowing how to handle an animal and b. not taking the piss by roping other people in. 

Disappointed in your comments - I have had dogs for a great part of my life and I have given all sorts of meds and injected insulin and handled dog with ruptured cruciate ligament etc etc .... but sometimes its the smaller things that need 2 pairs of hands and not everybody has family on tap to help. If a colleague, who is a friend, offers to help why would you turn it down?  I have travelled a lot and my friends now are pretty much all through work - are they not considered to be 'real' friends?

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4 minutes ago, daisy said:

Disappointed in your comments - I have had dogs for a great part of my life and I have given all sorts of meds and injected insulin and handled dog with ruptured cruciate ligament etc etc .... but sometimes its the smaller things that need 2 pairs of hands and not everybody has family on tap to help. If a colleague, who is a friend, offers to help why would you turn it down?  I have travelled a lot and my friends now are pretty much all through work - are they not considered to be 'real' friends?

Well, of course you would call on real friends from work,  but not at the workplace and you have to sure you are calling on them as a friend and not their boss.

Frankly, the simple answer would be to put a loop of bandage round the dog's muzzle for the couple of minutes to administer the drops.  Also, not to make a big deal of it, animals pick that up. 

From the info, it is pretty pathetic as both a pet owner and a public office holder/boss to have got yourself into that situation. You should be able to deal with medicating your pets and you should be able to recognise boundaries in your official life.  

Sorry to disappoint but really from two perspectives it was a stupid situation to get yourself into. 

Meanwhile,  I hope the dog is getting the medication it needs. 

 

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