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Man charged with having book


HeliX
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20 minutes ago, Peter Layman said:

Wonder why?

Why would it be? The book is mostly a load of overhyped toss anyway. Everyone I knew at school had a copy. Prosecuting people for having particular bits of knowledge is literally thought crime.

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12 hours ago, HeliX said:

Why would it be? The book is mostly a load of overhyped toss anyway. Everyone I knew at school had a copy. Prosecuting people for having particular bits of knowledge is literally thought crime.

You should be pretty safe from prosecution then

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It is a crime to possess material likely to be of use to a terrorist. 

It's a huge catch all. 

I wonder how many ex-Squaddies have kept their field guides and handbooks too. 

Frankly, I'm a bit disturbed by these sorts of powers. Various academics could be caught up by it. And a law which has an exception for Professor Jeeves is a pretty poor one and there is a huge risk Professor Khan could be at risk of double standards while countless nerds are criminalised for being over curious. 

It's a sad reflection on our society but gives coppers a simpler way to use the system to criminalise people they are suspicious of. 

Slippery slope anyone?

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Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Notable incidents of alleged use and attempts to suppress[edit]

1976: Police linked the bombing of Grand Central Terminal and hijacking of a TWA flight to Croatian radicals who used instructions from The Anarchist Cookbook.[3]

1981: The Anarchist Cookbook was linked to Puerto Rican rebels who bombed an FBI headquarters using the book's directions. Thomas Spinks also referred to the text during the bombings of 10 abortion clinics in the United States.[3]

1995: The perpetrators of the Oklahoma City bombing were alleged to have used directions from the book.[25]

1999: Police found The Anarchist Cookbook in possession of the Columbine High School shooters Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, in Littleton, Colorado; it may have inspired them.[25]

2002: The Canadian government permitted the book to be imported from the United States. Canada Customs and Revenue Agency concluded the book does not violate either hate or obscenity laws, therefore the previous ban on the text was resolved.[26]

2007: A 17-year-old was arrested in the United Kingdom and faced charges under anti-terrorism law in the UK for possession of The Anarchists' Cookbook.[27] He was cleared of all charges in October 2008, after arguing that he was a prankster who just wanted to research fireworks and smoke bombs.[28]

2010: In County Durham, UK, Ian Davison and his son were imprisoned under anti-terrorism laws for the manufacturing of ricin. Their possession of The Anarchist Cookbook, along with its availability, was noted by the authorities.[29] This led to a London judge and police campaigning to have the book banned in the UK.[3]

2012: The Anarchist Cookbook was found to have been in the possession of James Holmes, the perpetrator of the Aurora theater shooting in Colorado, USA.[30]

2013: Renewed calls were made in the United States to ban the book, citing links to a school shooting in Arapahoe, Colorado, and the Santa Monica, California, shootings by Karl Pierson.[15][31]

2015: The London public-transport bombers were linked to the book.[3]

2015: U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein pushed to have the book removed from online databases.[16]

2016: The book was refused classification by the Office of Film and Literature Classification upon release, thus making the book banned in Australia. It was classified RC again on 31 October 2016.[32][33]

2017: A 27-year-old was prosecuted in the UK solely for the possession of the book. He was found not guilty.[34]

2020: A 23-year old mathematics graduate of the University of Cambridge was convicted of 'collecting information useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism', based on his possession of the book, despite claiming to have bought the book from Amazon out of academic interest.[35][36]

Lots of ifs, buts and maybes 

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3 hours ago, Peter Layman said:

Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Notable incidents of alleged use and attempts to suppress[edit]

1976: Police linked the bombing of Grand Central Terminal and hijacking of a TWA flight to Croatian radicals who used instructions from The Anarchist Cookbook.[3]

1981: The Anarchist Cookbook was linked to Puerto Rican rebels who bombed an FBI headquarters using the book's directions. Thomas Spinks also referred to the text during the bombings of 10 abortion clinics in the United States.[3]

1995: The perpetrators of the Oklahoma City bombing were alleged to have used directions from the book.[25]

1999: Police found The Anarchist Cookbook in possession of the Columbine High School shooters Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, in Littleton, Colorado; it may have inspired them.[25]

2002: The Canadian government permitted the book to be imported from the United States. Canada Customs and Revenue Agency concluded the book does not violate either hate or obscenity laws, therefore the previous ban on the text was resolved.[26]

2007: A 17-year-old was arrested in the United Kingdom and faced charges under anti-terrorism law in the UK for possession of The Anarchists' Cookbook.[27] He was cleared of all charges in October 2008, after arguing that he was a prankster who just wanted to research fireworks and smoke bombs.[28]

2010: In County Durham, UK, Ian Davison and his son were imprisoned under anti-terrorism laws for the manufacturing of ricin. Their possession of The Anarchist Cookbook, along with its availability, was noted by the authorities.[29] This led to a London judge and police campaigning to have the book banned in the UK.[3]

2012: The Anarchist Cookbook was found to have been in the possession of James Holmes, the perpetrator of the Aurora theater shooting in Colorado, USA.[30]

2013: Renewed calls were made in the United States to ban the book, citing links to a school shooting in Arapahoe, Colorado, and the Santa Monica, California, shootings by Karl Pierson.[15][31]

2015: The London public-transport bombers were linked to the book.[3]

2015: U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein pushed to have the book removed from online databases.[16]

2016: The book was refused classification by the Office of Film and Literature Classification upon release, thus making the book banned in Australia. It was classified RC again on 31 October 2016.[32][33]

2017: A 27-year-old was prosecuted in the UK solely for the possession of the book. He was found not guilty.[34]

2020: A 23-year old mathematics graduate of the University of Cambridge was convicted of 'collecting information useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism', based on his possession of the book, despite claiming to have bought the book from Amazon out of academic interest.[35][36]

Lots of ifs, buts and maybes 

Half of those were blamed on rock music too. As a guitarist and part time anarchist I feel very oppressed.

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7 hours ago, Chinahand said:

It is a crime to possess material likely to be of use to a terrorist. 

It's a huge catch all. 

I wonder how many ex-Squaddies have kept their field guides and handbooks too. 

Frankly, I'm a bit disturbed by these sorts of powers. Various academics could be caught up by it. And a law which has an exception for Professor Jeeves is a pretty poor one and there is a huge risk Professor Khan could be at risk of double standards while countless nerds are criminalised for being over curious. 

It's a sad reflection on our society but gives coppers a simpler way to use the system to criminalise people they are suspicious of. 

Slippery slope anyone?

They tried (and thankfully failed) to criminalise hacking tools under similar offences.

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On 10/19/2021 at 11:21 AM, Chinahand said:

It is a crime to possess material likely to be of use to a terrorist. 

It's a huge catch all. 

I wonder how many ex-Squaddies have kept their field guides and handbooks too. 

Frankly, I'm a bit disturbed by these sorts of powers. Various academics could be caught up by it. And a law which has an exception for Professor Jeeves is a pretty poor one and there is a huge risk Professor Khan could be at risk of double standards while countless nerds are criminalised for being over curious. 

It's a sad reflection on our society but gives coppers a simpler way to use the system to criminalise people they are suspicious of. 

Slippery slope anyone?

I suppose they're going to arrest the entire Olympic judo team, for possessing knowledge useful in an act of assault.

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