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Teachers mental health


hissingsid
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So what then is the cause of all the bad classroom behaviour? And secondly, how should it be addressed?

I came from a teaching "family" although it wasn't an avenue I took. Those family members now retired from long careers of 40+ years who watched the breakdown of classroom discipline during those careers declare to a man that they would not return to the classroom under the circumstances that exist now.

They also firmly blame that breakdown on the consistent reduction in the authority to impose discipline on classroom offenders, to include corporal when justified.

I was educated during those "bad old days" of corporal punishment. On the rare occasions that I was in receipt it was justified in hindsight. I saw others receive it.

I also saw unruly and disruptive individuals brought to heel by it and a studying and obedience atmosphere maintained in the classrooms to the benefit of those who wished to study and progress. And teach. This was in the days of "O" Levels and GCEs, including the ones I attained because of that atmosphere being maintained.

Now I see and hear of teachers sworn at and abused and leaving the profession. Of classrooms and education disrupted to the detriment of all, to ensure that the disruptive minority do not have their "rights" infringed. Of attempts to have what disciplinary measures are available laughed at and ignored.

And we wonder why behaviour in society is on the slide. And it is, compared to 50 years ago.

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Unfortunately the physical punishments for poor behaviour would be classed as physical abuse these days and you can see why.

In some schools shouting is seen as verbal abuse, which reduces the teachers authority further. Soon a raised voice could lead to disciplinary action… against the teacher!

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4 minutes ago, HeliX said:

Based on what? Your guesswork? Doesn't outrank actual studies, sorry. 

Based on most people who were educated at the time who say no classroom disruption as it was dealt with swiftly & harshly & didn’t happen again 

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20 minutes ago, Banker said:

Based on most people who were educated at the time who say no classroom disruption as it was dealt with swiftly & harshly & didn’t happen again 

You realise that if corporal punishment was truly effective as a deterrent then there would never have been a requirement to use it?

The fact that I know people who received corporal punishment more than once also suggests that it didn't work as well as you suggest.

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1 minute ago, manxman1980 said:

You realise that if corporal punishment was truly effective as a deterrent then there would never have been a requirement to use it?

The fact that I know people who received corporal punishment more than once also suggests that it didn't work as well as you suggest.

There’s always a few who need constant thrashing but generally it keeps the vast majority in check, those who would be disruptive without effective punishment didn’t do it as they didn’t want a slipper or hand across the head or the cane for serious matter 

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13 minutes ago, gymbabe said:

I can’t say that many teachers would be in favour of corporal punishment, even if it was permitted! 

Well they were all pretty fond of it back in my day!

Sadistically so most of them.

Edited by finlo
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Just to contribute my two penny worth.

I went to an all boys Grammar school where corporal punishment was rife. I was given the “slipper” as a result of mistaken identity and I still feel pissed off about it to this day. It hurt.

I do question when people say I got a whack when I was naughty, never did me any harm. Well did I’t do you any good? Apart from perpetuating violence perhaps?

 

That said I do acknowledge that teaching a class of unruly children cannot be easy but going back to the days of physical abuse cannot be the answer. Particularly when you have such over protective parents these days many of whom falsely claim, “ well my little Johnny has autism/ ADHD so it’s not his fault.” It is a real condition but it seems improbable to me that so many present it as an excuse for bad behaviour.

Cue outrage and vilification.

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4 hours ago, The Voice of Reason said:

It is a real condition but it seems improbable to me that so many present it as an excuse for bad behaviour.

A clinical diagnosis of autism has pretty strict criteria - any with a "doctors note" so to speak will be true. ADHD probably open to some fraudulence, but that said the increase in rate is mostly because it's better understood (though still not well) and better diagnosed now.

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20 hours ago, manxman1980 said:

You realise that if corporal punishment was truly effective as a deterrent then there would never have been a requirement to use it?

The fact that I know people who received corporal punishment more than once also suggests that it didn't work as well as you suggest.

You are truly far removed from the real world. 

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