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Teachers mental health


hissingsid
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They should be managing the sickness absence, checking on persistent offenders etc, stopping pay for suspected skivers etc

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Obviously there are teachers who are having a tough time, but the option to pull a sickie on full pay is too easy.

So they generally take advantage of the option to pull 'sickies' for minor illness do they ?

Or was that just to trigger ?

Edited by ballaughbiker
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Are they just sad like everyone else is and fancy a week off? 

Yeah. I know one teacher at work today despite having a suspected lateral tibial condyle fracture (sustained at work a couple of weeks ago) . Oh and she's in her mid 60s and 'just getting on with it' dealing with some of the island's most challenging children for mediocre reward. 

We know you are 'sick of hearing about these teachers' and think they don't work until state retirement age but this inconvenient example has only been mentioned to balance your apparent ideology.

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I expect I'll be shot down in flames for even thinking this, but is anyone else concerned about this increased noise about 'mental health issues'? Not just in the teaching profession, but in almost every part of society.

I admit to being an old gammon, but I grew up admiring people who overcame anxiety and faced their fears head on - people like Scott of the Antarctic, Douglas Bader, Donald Campbell and numerous others who triumphed over adversity. Nowadays we look for reasons NOT to challenge ourselves and take responsibility. I say that as someone who has been on his knees many times both personally and professionally, when waving the white flag of surrender would have been a much more comfortable option than gritting my teeth, accepting that (at the time) my children and others relied on me, and trying my hardest to get things back on track.

I worry that the modern world is concentrating on the wrong things - gender pronouns, identity politics and an alleged climate emergency amongst others - and failing to teach resilience. We've so bought into the lie that our children can be 'whatever they want' that aspirations are often unreachable, or that the world is going to go up in flames. What we should be telling our kids is that life can be hard, that failure is just a natural part of learning, and that to be an adult you need to learn how to cope with adversity.

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1 minute ago, Stu Peters said:

I expect I'll be shot down in flames for even thinking this, but is anyone else concerned about this increased noise about 'mental health issues'? Not just in the teaching profession, but in almost every part of society.

I admit to being an old gammon, but I grew up admiring people who overcame anxiety and faced their fears head on - people like Scott of the Antarctic, Douglas Bader, Donald Campbell and numerous others who triumphed over adversity. Nowadays we look for reasons NOT to challenge ourselves and take responsibility. I say that as someone who has been on his knees many times both personally and professionally, when waving the white flag of surrender would have been a much more comfortable option than gritting my teeth, accepting that (at the time) my children and others relied on me, and trying my hardest to get things back on track.

I worry that the modern world is concentrating on the wrong things - gender pronouns, identity politics and an alleged climate emergency amongst others - and failing to teach resilience. We've so bought into the lie that our children can be 'whatever they want' that aspirations are often unreachable, or that the world is going to go up in flames. What we should be telling our kids is that life can be hard, that failure is just a natural part of learning, and that to be an adult you need to learn how to cope with adversity.

It's the easy escape for a lot of people Stu. Pretty much when you read court reports stating they'll await social reports before sentencing. The scrotes didn't need a social report to do the crime did they?

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So I don't need to hear a load of teachers moaning about how exclusively hard done by they are.

You actually wouldn't have heard about this one IF the disparaging tone of the majority of your (and other's) posts on this thread hadn't indicated some degree of anti teacher ideology. 

Perhaps you haven't considered that some kids 'have to' be cared for much more than most imagine which is why they are some of the most challenging in the island. She is just getting on with it because somebody has to.

I'd stop digging .. 😉

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14 minutes ago, offshoremanxman said:

On the contrary I spend my whole day dealing with people who are sick and tired and pissed off and fed up. Who are skint after covid and in some cases are desperately stressed at the situation they're in.

In between being on here all day? Fucking Superman so y'are.

Pinocchio. 

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24 minutes ago, Stu Peters said:

... and failing to teach resilience.

 

What we should be telling our kids is that life can be hard, that failure is just a natural part of learning, and that to be an adult you need to learn how to cope with adversity.

Teaching resilience and strength in the face of adversity are at the heart of the Manx Curriculum:

 

"However, the Island has its own curriculum, Essentials for Learning, which affords a more holistic way of educating children to ensure they develop 'the 6 Rs' – readiness; relationships which are positive; resourcefulness; resilience; remembering skills and reflectiveness."

https://www.gov.im/about-the-government/departments/education-sport-and-culture/media-centre/#:~:text=However%2C the Island has its,resilience%3B remembering skills and reflectiveness.

 

 

 

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33 minutes ago, offshoremanxman said:

On the contrary I spend my whole day dealing with people who are sick and tired and pissed off and fed up. Who are skint after covid and in some cases are desperately stressed at the situation they're in. So I don't need to hear a load of teachers moaning about how exclusively hard done by they are. Everyone else is just getting on with it - because they have to.

They aren't claiming exclusivity over being overworked or underpaid.

 

They are fighting to change the situation they are in. If you feel as though a group of people trying to better their work environment and be fairly compensated for their work is a bad thing then please expand...

 

Saying "well I have it bad, so they should too" isn't a good argument.

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1 minute ago, offshoremanxman said:

You mentioned pay again. Remember it isn’t about pay 😂😂

https://opentextbc.ca/businessopenstax/chapter/herzbergs-motivator-hygiene-theory/#:~:text=What Herzberg termed hygiene factors,and benefits%2C and job security.

"What Herzberg termed hygiene factors (also called dissatisfiers) are extrinsic elements of the work environment such as company policy, relationships with supervisors, working conditions, relationships with peers and subordinates, salary and benefits, and job security. These are factors that can result in job dissatisfaction if not well managed."

 

To put it in simple terms for you:

 

Low pay = unhappy.

Unhappy = poor mental health.

 

So yes, it is about pay and mental health. The two are intrinsically linked.

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2 minutes ago, offshoremanxman said:

To put in simple terms to you. That literally is absolute bollocks. 

Great retort. It would have been nice if you'd have engaged with the point with a solid counterargument.

Low pay signifies poor wellbeing. It is well documented and accepted as true in clinical psychology.

Since understanding long words and reading is hard sometimes, here is a picture for you, source:

 

https://www.health.org.uk/news-and-comment/blogs/mental-health-and-wellbeing-for-people-receiving-persistently-lower-pay

Screenshot_20220317-122038.jpg

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7 minutes ago, offshoremanxman said:

You can tell you’re a teacher just by your general condescending and superior attitude. What you posted was a load of pseudo academic nonsense and even if it had a grain of truth teachers are not poorly paid. There are people stacking shelves at Tesco who are happy on £10 an hour. Teachers are paid well in excess of what are acknowledged as low wages. They also get very good pensions and other employee benefits. So to be honest your claim that your mental health is suffering because you are low paid is literally rubbish - the stuff of pure fantasy. 

Ok, if you refuse to accept well documented psychological theories and supporting evidence then there isn't much that can be done to get you to engage, let alone change your mind.

 

I have made no claims about my profession, wage or mental health.

 

It's quite telling that you project your feelings about teachers in this way. The chip on your shoulder is so large I could have it with beans and call it a baked potato.

 

Edit: to respond to your edit. Yes indeed, there are teachers who are having to use the food bank:

https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/young-teachers-struggle-to-make-ends-meet/

Edited by DrunkenMonkey
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