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Teachers mental health


hissingsid
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Interesting that a man who claims to represent the people of Middle has taken it upon himself to dismiss the health issues of many people, some of whom will live in that area. Thank goodness more people these days recognise the importance of addressing mental health problems as early as possible and that adding to the stigma, as he is doing, is dangerous and shows zero empathy for the experiences of others. Who is he to judge others when he has no idea about their lives? It frightens me that an ignorant, arrogant man like this can be voted in to the Keys (albeit by a small portion of our population). Careless words can have a devastating impact when a person feels vulnerable. You should feel ashamed and I suggest you allow yourself to be educated by those in our community with lived and/or professional experience before you do more damage.

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5 hours ago, manxman34 said:

He won't know anything really - probably bases his beliefs on the way they were portrayed in films

Probably no coincidence that Middle is the only constituency which wouldn't look out of place next to the word gammon.

Edited by jackwhite
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https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/schools-told-to-ask-government-for-help-if-covid-situation-worsens/?fbclid=IwAR0vffI0gSIuCfYH5KOpW3g6n1e1ojF0NXpPT9AuggdmPQcy-6g6tD9pufg

 

Two high schools send pupils home due to staff absence

The education minister says she’ll have to look at other ways of keeping students in school if rising Covid-19 cases put further pressure on staffing.

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15 hours ago, jackwhite said:

Not surprising Stu admires then, seem to have a lot in common! 

 

14 hours ago, manxman34 said:

He won't know anything really - probably bases his beliefs on the way they were portrayed in films

Stu will just make a claim of you both being "woke" and "cancelling" such heroes by applying modern standards and attitudes.

 

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20 hours ago, HeliX said:

And what if the employee is productive and adds value? As most do. Not sure why you're laser focusing on the ones that don't.

Let’s say that this productive employee,adding value, works on an assembly line.

He/she leaves and is replaced by a robot (costing very little when amortised over its useful life) producing more widgets than that employee could ever humanly do.

Then you can’t say that profits would fall once the human employee has left.

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My own twopennyworth, is that life has been relatively easy for most.  Low infant mortality, less disease, no significant wars, better accommodation and living standards.  It is that that gives rise to the lack of resilience, IMHO.  In past years people were resilient because they had to be, life was tough for the majority and it was about survival, nothing more. 

It is a symptom of a successful society and economy, I suppose. 

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23 minutes ago, Gladys said:

My own twopennyworth, is that life has been relatively easy for most.  Low infant mortality, less disease, no significant wars, better accommodation and living standards.  It is that that gives rise to the lack of resilience, IMHO.  In past years people were resilient because they had to be, life was tough for the majority and it was about survival, nothing more. 

It is a symptom of a successful society and economy, I suppose. 

My old boss said similar about 20 years ago, something along the lines of “what this country needs is a fucking good earthquake to refocus people’s priorities”. 

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46 minutes ago, Gladys said:

My own twopennyworth, is that life has been relatively easy for most.  Low infant mortality, less disease, no significant wars, better accommodation and living standards.  It is that that gives rise to the lack of resilience, IMHO.  In past years people were resilient because they had to be, life was tough for the majority and it was about survival, nothing more. 

It is a symptom of a successful society and economy, I suppose. 

Not helped by the "no winners and no losers" that teachers like to impress upon today's kids

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1 hour ago, wrighty said:

My old boss said similar about 20 years ago, something along the lines of “what this country needs is a fucking good earthquake to refocus people’s priorities”. 

Much more succinct, but possibly accurate.   How some people have dealt with Covid being a good example. 

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On 3/17/2022 at 11:34 AM, Stu Peters said:

I expect I'll be shot down in flames for even thinking this, but is anyone else concerned about this increased noise about 'mental health issues'? Not just in the teaching profession, but in almost every part of society.

I admit to being an old gammon, but I grew up admiring people who overcame anxiety and faced their fears head on - people like Scott of the Antarctic, Douglas Bader, Donald Campbell and numerous others who triumphed over adversity. Nowadays we look for reasons NOT to challenge ourselves and take responsibility. I say that as someone who has been on his knees many times both personally and professionally, when waving the white flag of surrender would have been a much more comfortable option than gritting my teeth, accepting that (at the time) my children and others relied on me, and trying my hardest to get things back on track.

I worry that the modern world is concentrating on the wrong things - gender pronouns, identity politics and an alleged climate emergency amongst others - and failing to teach resilience. We've so bought into the lie that our children can be 'whatever they want' that aspirations are often unreachable, or that the world is going to go up in flames. What we should be telling our kids is that life can be hard, that failure is just a natural part of learning, and that to be an adult you need to learn how to cope with adversity.

Looking at the way this post is being shared on social media, I expect the pitchfork brigade at your door any minute now. I actually think you are at least partially right but the topic is complex. There is no doubt that some people get burned out by their jobs and that mental health issues are on the rise. There are many factors for that, from changed working conditions to social media. The latter doing a ton of harm without anyone properly realising it yet or doing anything about it. 

Yes, kids should be told that life can be hard and unless you’re born rich, you have to work for your stuff and the more stuff you want, the more you have to work and the more risks you have to take, usually anyway. Taking risks and going out of your comfort zone is shit scary. Not everyone is cut out for that and that’s totally ok. Everyone is different. Some want a secure and easy job that gives them a steady routine and makes them feel safe. Some say fuck it and risk it all. Both deserve the same respect because both are needed for the world to function. 

While I agree that it’s good to be resilient and ambitious, shouldn’t we as a society aim to be a place where everyone can have a fair shot at happiness, no matter what that might look like for the individual? Ideally, none of us should have to struggle and overcome adversity. It’s not an ideal world so that’s never going to happen, but we can always be a bit more mindful in how we treat others. While you might feel strong and proven right from your past struggles, you never know what battle the person next to you is fighting. 

You as a politician should strive to make this a fair place where everyone can at least try to fulfil his or her ambitions, and where people don’t have to work until they drop. Will there be chancers trying to abuse the system? Absolutely. That’s why more support for mental health is needed. To help those really in need and catch those who cheat.

One of the great things of the world today is the fact that we have come a long way and don’t require children to work 16 hours in Laxey mines anymore to teach them the value of hard work. Let’s not go back to that time or thinking. 

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On 3/17/2022 at 2:21 PM, ManxTaxPayer said:

He's just trying to be all Clarkson on it. Really transparent. 

I like cars and I like Clarkson - especially his resilience when he tells the simple truth as he sees it and is lambasted for having the temerity to express an opinion that is not a result of hivemind groupthink. There are lots of people I admire - I don't try to emulate any of them, although I do a fair impression of JC saying 'disagreeable'.

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1 hour ago, Passing Time said:

Not helped by the "no winners and no losers" that teachers like to impress upon today's kids

Is this true? You have evidence of this in Manx schools? Last I heard there was inter-school competition in all sorts of sports, public speaking, Junior Achievement etc

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