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Teachers mental health


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12 minutes ago, Stu Peters said:

I like cars and I like Clarkson - especially his resilience when he tells the simple truth as he sees it and is lambasted for having the temerity to express an opinion that is not a result of hivemind groupthink. There are lots of people I admire - I don't try to emulate any of them, although I do a fair impression of JC saying 'disagreeable'.

He's a nasty piece of work, isn't he? Sacked for attacking his producer, IIRC, because the hotel only had meat and cheese platters. Using the N word on TV (edited out). A smug, entitled, racist,superficial old man clinging to the 1970s - no wonder you admire him.

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2 hours ago, Gladys said:

My own twopennyworth, is that life has been relatively easy for most.  Low infant mortality, less disease, no significant wars, better accommodation and living standards.  It is that that gives rise to the lack of resilience, IMHO.  In past years people were resilient because they had to be, life was tough for the majority and it was about survival, nothing more. 

It is a symptom of a successful society and economy, I suppose. 

In fact we tend to over-estimate the resilience of those in the past.  Just because people didn't talk about such things, doesn't mean that they didn't happen.  It's only when you start to look beyond official narratives into the statistics and personal accounts that you find out the true situation.  Many more people were hospitalised in 'lunatic asylums', not to mention in workhouses and private institutions for middle-class sufferers for instance.

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35 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

In fact we tend to over-estimate the resilience of those in the past.  Just because people didn't talk about such things, doesn't mean that they didn't happen.  It's only when you start to look beyond official narratives into the statistics and personal accounts that you find out the true situation.  Many more people were hospitalised in 'lunatic asylums', not to mention in workhouses and private institutions for middle-class sufferers for instance.

I am not saying it was right, but it is an explanation.  Nor am I saying there were no mental health issues, but I do think older generations were more resilient, they had to be or they didn't eat.  

I suspect mental health issues arose as much from the societal constructs at the time as from what we would called mental health issues now.  

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2 hours ago, Stu Peters said:

I like cars and I like Clarkson - especially his resilience when he tells the simple truth as he sees it and is lambasted for having the temerity to express an opinion that is not a result of hivemind groupthink.

I quite like him too, especially his new farming stuff. He doesn't seem quite as desperate to be lambasted as you though. 

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7 hours ago, The Voice of Reason said:

Let’s say that this productive employee,adding value, works on an assembly line.

He/she leaves and is replaced by a robot (costing very little when amortised over its useful life) producing more widgets than that employee could ever humanly do.

Then you can’t say that profits would fall once the human employee has left.

Concocting happenings other than what's actually happening so that your argument makes any sense at all is an interesting tactic.

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7 hours ago, Gladys said:

My own twopennyworth, is that life has been relatively easy for most.  Low infant mortality, less disease, no significant wars, better accommodation and living standards.  It is that that gives rise to the lack of resilience, IMHO.  In past years people were resilient because they had to be, life was tough for the majority and it was about survival, nothing more. 

It is a symptom of a successful society and economy, I suppose. 

I'm in my 30s and have lived through half a dozen "once in a lifetime" financial crises and a pandemic.

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51 minutes ago, HeliX said:

I'm in my 30s and have lived through half a dozen "once in a lifetime" financial crises and a pandemic.

Hardly a day to day battle to survive though.  That is the point.

It is not to say that mental health issues now are meaningless, or don't exist, or are made up, more to do with resilience. 

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6 hours ago, manxman34 said:

He's a nasty piece of work, isn't he? Sacked for attacking his producer, IIRC, because the hotel only had meat and cheese platters. Using the N word on TV (edited out). A smug, entitled, racist,superficial old man clinging to the 1970s - no wonder you admire him.

Yes, it's only me who likes him. That's how he became a multi millionaire and the most famous motoring journalist (and social commentator) ... in the world! Met him twice and IRL he's a modest, friendly, approachable and likeable bloke.

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22 minutes ago, Gladys said:

Hardly a day to day battle to survive though.  That is the point.

It is not to say that mental health issues now are meaningless, or don't exist, or are made up, more to do with resilience. 

Most people haven't had a day to day battle to survive since pre-medieval times. Unless you mean financially, in which case its pretty bad at present.

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9 hours ago, HeliX said:

Most people haven't had a day to day battle to survive since pre-medieval times. Unless you mean financially, in which case its pretty bad at present.

Up until quite recently  ie within the last 100 years, I think the battle to survive was a day to day battle for many.  Lack of medical knowledge, or lack of money to access what there was, working conditions, poor public health and sanitation,  poor nutrition, poor education, long and widespread wars.  The list goes on on how we have become used to an expectation of survival to an old age, rather than having an expectation that your survival was under continual threat.

And I don't mean financial survival, although of course, it is a contributor to continued actual survival. 

Much of the world is still in that state of daily existential threat; it is not a state of affairs confined to pre-medieval times. 

That is not saying dismissively,  'first world problem, get on with it', but to acknowledge that the so-called 'first world problems' may have a psychological foundation rather than being a symptom of a spoilt and materialistic generation who need to get a grip. 

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17 hours ago, Amadeus said:

You as a politician should strive to make this a fair place where everyone can at least try to fulfil his or her ambitions, and where people don’t have to work until they drop. Will there be chancers trying to abuse the system? Absolutely. That’s why more support for mental health is needed. To help those really in need and catch those who cheat.

One of the great things of the world today is the fact that we have come a long way and don’t require children to work 16 hours in Laxey mines anymore to teach them the value of hard work. Let’s not go back to that time or thinking. 

I’m not sure there’s any evidence that Stu doesn’t want to make this a fair place where ambitions are fulfilled etc.

We often accuse our politicians of being bland and playing it safe. Whatever you think of Stu’s stance on climate change at least he does speak his mind. 
It may be a bit controversial for some but it’s not like he’s advocating the return of children to Laxey mines or anything like that.

The only thing that does concern me about him though is his hero worshiping of Clarkson 

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12 hours ago, Stu Peters said:

Yes, it's only me who likes him. That's how he became a multi millionaire and the most famous motoring journalist (and social commentator) ... in the world! Met him twice and IRL he's a modest, friendly, approachable and likeable bloke.

Doesn’t really tie in with this does it: 

I like cars and I like Clarkson - especially his resilience when he tells the simple truth as he sees it and is lambasted for having the temerity to express an opinion that is not a result of hivemind groupthink.

He’s so lambasted that he’s had his own newspaper column and countless tv shows over the years. What resilience he’s shown by continuing to express the same dogshit opinions that have made him a multi-millionaire.

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