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Pets in Flats..?


quilp
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There are calls to landlords and letters to make allowances for tenants who have or plan to have a pet living with them. Personally, were I a landlord I wouldn't allow it.

I moved into a house previously occupied by an old couple who had 2 dogs and 2 cats. Seemed like a nice place but after a few days my partner and I started scratching. It then became apparent that the house was crawling with fleas. Not only that, the smell of damp dog and cat piss began to invade the nostrils. When I viewed the house maybe the over-powering stench of air-freshener should've been the clue. It was furnished, quite tastefully, but under every carpet, cushion, even the curtains and between the floorboards those little blighters were everywhere. We had to move out for 24, "preferably 48" hours to allow fumigation to take place and again, 10 weeks later! Expensive too, being south London. It worked but which landlord wants to run the risk of the potential hazards and potential costs associated with pets in their flats?

I had a dog which was left alone in the flat when I went to work. I was completely unaware, obviously, that once I left in the morning he would bark the whole day. Only when confronted by the tenants above and below, distraught with the constant noise (a Kelpie, big dog, big bark) and a ticking-off from a great landlord did I catch on and unfortunately had to find a new owner for him. Sob...

After asking family and friends with rental property it's a no-no as far as they're concerned.

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It's also a question of should people be having dogs if they can't be with them all day. 

Modern blocks of flats just generally aren't always great places to keep dogs, especially big ones that ideally should have some kind of back garden they can run around during the day. 

 

I want a horse but don't have a stable, could I keep that in a flat? 

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1 minute ago, 0bserver said:

It's also a question of should people be having dogs if they can't be with them all day. 

Modern blocks of flats just generally aren't always great places to keep dogs, especially big ones that ideally should have some kind of back garden they can run around during the day. 

 

I want a horse but don't have a stable, could I keep that in a flat? 

There are many people who will walk a dog for free - many old people here who aren't so mobile make use of this service.

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17 minutes ago, quilp said:

I moved into a house previously occupied by an old couple who had 2 dogs and 2 cats. Seemed like a nice place but after a few days my partner and I started scratching. It then became apparent that the house was crawling with fleas. Not only that, the smell of damp dog and cat piss began to invade the nostrils. When I viewed the house maybe the over-powering stench of air-freshener should've been the clue. It was furnished, quite tastefully, but under every carpet, cushion, even the curtains and between the floorboards those little blighters were everywhere. We had to move out for 24, "preferably 48" hours to allow fumigation to take place and again, 10 weeks later! Expensive too, being south London. It worked but which landlord wants to run the risk of the potential hazards and potential costs associated with pets in their flats?

Tenants like that would have found a way to ruin the place without pets too.

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10 minutes ago, HeliX said:

Tenants like that would have found a way to ruin the place without pets too.

True enough, you should see the state of some National Trust cottages after people have been there for a week. I know a lady responsible for changeovers, sometimes the whole place has to be steam cleaned, curtains and carpet replaced because of the pee and shit all over, and not from pets either.

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8 minutes ago, GD4ELI said:

The fleas will not necessarily come from the pets.

Quite. In my experience, as well as being nose-blind to the damp dog and stench from a litter-tray, a lot of pet owners are flea-blind. Or just don't care. Which can be a problem for visitors then carrying them home and unwittingly infesting their own, pet-less home. Female flea lays 40-50 eggs per day, for around 50-60 days, up to 2000 in its lifetime.

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13 minutes ago, quilp said:

Quite. In my experience, as well as being nose-blind to the damp dog and stench from a litter-tray, a lot of pet owners are flea-blind. Or just don't care. Which can be a problem for visitors then carrying them home and unwittingly infesting their own, pet-less home. Female flea lays 40-50 eggs per day, for around 50-60 days, up to 2000 in its lifetime.

Fleas are rare. After 35+ years as a dog owner I'm yet to see one from my mutts, have seen one from a friend's hound.

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34 minutes ago, 0bserver said:

 I want a horse but don't have a stable, could I keep that in a flat? 

I heard about a bloke once who lived in a flat.  He bought a Shetland Pony, somehow, off eBay.  Kept it tied up outside the block.  Would occasionally feed it a kebab.

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6 minutes ago, GD4ELI said:

Fleas are rare. After 35+ years as a dog owner I'm yet to see one from my mutts, have seen one from a friend's hound.

Cats get fleas if they hunt.  When I lived in a more rural location the cat used to catch rabbits.  Required regular flea treatment.  Now I live in town, and my cats are not hunters, rarely see a flea on them.  Only occasionally have to use Frontline.

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Perhaps the approach to this should be from an animal welfare perspective. 

Having lived in a flat the only pets I had were tropical fish.  I chose not to have a cat/dog because of the lack of space and particularly a lack of outdoor space.  Dogs in particular need a lot of attention to be happy and healthy and as Quilp has stated they can behave very differently when their owners are not present including becoming depressed.

If a landlord allows pets then they should ensure that the lease agrees clauses relating to deep cleaning and fumigation.  That said landlords should also be required to ensure that the property is deep cleaned before renting to a new tenant rather than just accepting a payment from the previous tenant for repairs/maintenance but never actually doing them...

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1 minute ago, manxman1980 said:

Perhaps the approach to this should be from an animal welfare perspective. 

Having lived in a flat the only pets I had were tropical fish.  I chose not to have a cat/dog because of the lack of space and particularly a lack of outdoor space.  Dogs in particular need a lot of attention to be happy and healthy and as Quilp has stated they can behave very differently when their owners are not present including becoming depressed.

If a landlord allows pets then they should ensure that the lease agrees clauses relating to deep cleaning and fumigation.  That said landlords should also be required to ensure that the property is deep cleaned before renting to a new tenant rather than just accepting a payment from the previous tenant for repairs/maintenance but never actually doing them...

Hell must be freezing over -  because I fully agree with you! 

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A nearby flat was let out to a woman who took in a stray cat without asking the landlord. The cat was feral, and pregnant, and knew when to be friendly. It gave birth to a litter and left after a few weeks of seeing the woman was well capable of looking after them. The litter shat everywhere and wrecked the carpets and furniture. It cost the landlord many thousands. He was not sure if there were fleas as the flat had to be completely gutted including all furniture which was scratched and torn. An extreme case, but unless you have a golden tenant it just isn't worth the risk and heartache.

 

We had a cat that picked up fleas and it was a while before we realised. It is one hell of a job to get rid of them and can take months and months to get rid of them and there is always the risk of another outbreak. 

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13 minutes ago, GD4ELI said:

Fleas are rare. After 35+ years as a dog owner I'm yet to see one from my mutts, have seen one from a friend's hound.

Some dogs are more vulnerable and the fleas seem to like then. We have a jack Russell and a cockatoo. The jack russell never gets fleas. The cockapoo needs monthly flea tablets or else its full of them

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